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Achieving Harmony: Tuning into Practice

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Teaching Practice and Evaluation [clear filter]
Tuesday, June 16
 

9:00am

Achieving creative harmony: Tuning into arts-based approaches to education development
“To teach is not to transfer knowledge but to create the possibilities for the production or construction of knowledge” (Freire, 2000, p. 30). This hands-on experiential workshop tunes into the praxis of creativity by exploring the utilization of arts-informed (Efland, 2002), evidence-based (Petty, 2009) teaching strategies and their efficacy in promoting higher order thinking and double loop learning (Argyris, 1999). This approach to teaching and learning provides significant opportunities “that foster the capacity to construct interpretations” (Efland, 2002, p. 161) and as such are critical to the promotion of transformative learning (Dirkx, Mezirow & Cranton, 2006). Creative arts-based strategies are often overlooked as effective learning strategies in teacher education, despite the evidence that supports their use (Petty, 2009). Engagement in a creative learning process helps learners synthesize and integrate concepts and contributes to transformative learning (Author & Co Author, 2014). When implemented effectively, these innovative activities can tune into imaginations to open up new perspectives, construct alternative interpretations and assimilate learning.

Throughout the workshop, participants will engage in dynamic dialogue as they explore an experiential arts-based process and experience several dimensions of creativity. Challenges and opportunities implementing creative approaches to learning will be explored and examples of student work will be showcased and contextualized to their intended learning outcomes as situated learning. Specifically, participants will:

- Discuss critical questions related to the praxis of integrating creativity and arts-based strategies into teaching practice;
- Explore a number of arts-based, evidence-based instructional strategies; and
- Represent dynamic dialogue in an arts-based manner.

Speakers

Tuesday June 16, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
Chehalis Room

1:30pm

The bio-mechanics behind teaching and learning practical vocal exercises: The legacy of Jo Estill (1921-2010)
As a singer, researcher, and leader in voice mechanics and vocal pedagogy, Jo Estill’s objective was simple, yet daunting: she wanted to teach the world to sing. Though an accomplished singer herself, her ability to see the shortcomings of the then current vocal pedagogy and the questionable science upon which it was based, motivated her to create an efficient and scientifically sound program of voice instruction. Her work led to techniques that are employed across the disciplines of singing (in multiple genres), speech, and speech therapy.

Her investigation started with research into six different voice qualities: speech, falsetto, twang, sob, opera and belt. Each quality required a different configuration of the vocal tract and its various muscles. This led to the development of the figures for voice, the isolation of thirteen anatomical elements, the articulation of which can affect the quality of the voice. This developed into two courses: Figures for Voice Control, and Figure Combinations for Six Voice Qualities.

In this practical session the presenter, who teaches voice skills to lecturing faculty, speech to film and theatre students, and singing to musical theatre students, will outline the Estill Model, including the thirteen figures and the six qualities. A methodical approach for teaching these skills, including a thirteen-point diagnostic will be outlined. Attendees will be introduced to some of the figures suited to projecting the voice in the lecture hall and classroom. Some participants will undergo an Estill diagnostic assessment, and a demonstration of some techniques to enhance vocal presentation.


Tuesday June 16, 2015 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Chehalis Room
 
Wednesday, June 17
 

11:15am

CON01.03 - Tracking learning outcomes and assessment results in learning management systems
The changing landscapes for post-secondary education are increasingly requiring colleges and universities to measure educational quality, be more accountable and demonstrate how programs are maintaining standards. Measuring educational quality is more complex than simply measuring inputs and outputs (UNESCO 1990, 2000). Accrediting bodies such as the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs (ACBSP) require institutions to explicitly show evidence of how course and program learning outcomes are measured and aligned with an appropriate assessment strategy. Measuring learning outcomes includes examining course and program designs, pedagogy and faculty philosophies on learning and teaching (Bresciani et al., 2010).  This interactive presentation will have participants examine and classify the level of learning outcomes presented and then determine the types of assessment strategies that would align with the learning outcomes. Strategies for tracking student success of each learning outcome using a data base and learning management system will be presented. Participants will then engage in discussions to determine the benefits and challenges to creating and managing these tracking processes and if such processes contribute to learning and teaching and academic improvements (Nusche, 2008). 

References:

Bresciani, M. J., Gardner, M. M., & Hickmott, J. (2010). Demonstrating Student Success: A Practical Guide to Outcomes-Based Assessment of Learning and Development in Student Affairs. Stylus Publishing, LLC. PO Box 605, Herndon, VA 20172-0605.

Nusche, D. (2008). Assessment of learning outcomes in higher education: A comparative review of selected practices (No. 15). OECD Publishing.

UNESCO (2000). Dakar framework for action. Education for all: Meeting our collective commitments. Adopted by the World Education Forum, Dakar, Senegal, April 26-28, 1999. Paris: UNESCO. http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0012/001211/121147e.pdf



Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am
Thompson Room

11:15am

CON01.09 - Harmonic progression: Adapting an evaluation tool for online courses to a new setting
Evaluating online learning involves evaluating educational design, technology use, and “online instructional practices that integrate technology appropriately for developing and delivering quality online courses” (Bangert, 2008, p. 28). Research shows that classroom-based evaluation tools do not adequately capture the relationships between content, pedagogy, and technology in online courses (Berk, 2013). In response to this evidence, the Faculty of Arts and Science, which offers a large variety of online courses and programs, sought an alternative to the collective agreement-endorsed, university-wide evaluation tool, which is designed for classroom learning. An instrument developed by Bangert (2004) to assess constructivist-compatible online teaching practices, the Student Evaluation of Online Teaching Effectiveness (SEOTE), was adapted and piloted in 2014. The evaluation tool, like a harmonic chord, has different meanings in different contexts, some of which are discordant. This presentation explores those contexts, and explains the process by which consonance was achieved over two pilot phases. Using Stobart's (2009) validity framework as a guide, this process included negotiations with the university’s faculty association, statistical analyses of the data, and student and instructor focus groups to ascertain the tool’s usefulness. Audience members will be stimulated to consider factors that differentiate effective evaluation of online courses from classroom-based teaching. They will gain insight into strategies for introducing a new evaluation tool in a unionized environment, and methodologies for evaluating the tool itself. During the presentation, the audience will be invited to brainstorm items on which an online instructor/course could be assessed, which will then be compared to the SEOTE.

References:

Bangert, A. W. (2008). The development and validation of the student evaluation of online teaching effectiveness. Computers in the Schools, 25 (1-2), 25–47.

Bangert, A. W. (2004). The seven principles of of good practice: A framework for evaluating online teaching. The Internet and Higher Education, 7(3), 217–232.

Berk, R. A. (2013). Face-to-Face versus Online Course Evaluations: A “Consumer's Guide" to Seven Strategies. Journal of Online Learning & Teaching, 9(1). http://jolt.merlot.org/vol9no1/berk_0313.htm

Stobart, G. (2009). Determining validity in national curriculum assessments. Educational Research, 51(2), 161–179. doi:10.1080/00131880902891305



Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am
Cypress 1 Room

12:00pm

CON02.05 - Using role-immersion games like the 'Reacting to the Past' series in larger classes
Historical simulations have long if infrequently been used in classrooms, and recently a much more intense variation, promoted by the 'Reacting to the Past' consortium, has been advanced. Using terms like role-playing and role-immersion to distinguish them from much tamer versions (model UNs and the like) of the practice, these games have been touted as producing a large number of benefits and postive outcomes for students. However, the games were originally developed for classes at Barnard (NY), and are often designed for no more than about 20 students at a time. Over the last four years I have adapted one extant game and designed two role-immersion games, using them six times in first-year history classes of 80 students. I will discuss what mechanisms I have used including modifications of game rules as well as the use of factions and faction leaders, speaking rules, character descriptions, and indeterminate factions. I will also discuss the relative degrees of success, and my plans for the future.

Carnes, Mark C. (2014). Minds on Fire: How role-immersion games transform college. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674735354

Flaherty, Colleen. (2014, August 27). “Minds on Fire.” Inside Higher Ed. https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/08/27/book-advocates-reacting-past-pedagogy

Lang, James. (2014, September 29). "Stop Blaming Students for Your Listless Classroom: How the Use of Games as a Teaching Methodology Has the Potential to Break the Long History of Student Disengagement in College Learning." (Part 3) The Chronicle of Higher Education.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Thompson Room

12:00pm

CON02.08 - I flipped my tutorials: A case study of implementing active learning strategies in Engineering
Faculty Learning Communities (Cox, 2004) have been designed to introduce professors to a variety of active learning strategies (Prince, 2004) in the Faculty of Engineering at a large, research-intensive North American public university. After participating for more than a year a chemical Engineering professor and her teaching assistant (TA) decided to restructure their course to make it more student-centered. This resulted in a course where multiple active learning strategies (open-ended student response system, peer-review assignments, online quizzes and flipped tutorials) were used by both the instructor in class and the TA in tutorials. During this interactive session, the instructor, TA and educational developer will discuss the activities undertaken during the term. Several of the strategies will be used during the course of the session (e.g. open-ended response system, online quizzes and videos). Recommendations will be provided for future implementation of these strategies. The instructor and TA will share their reflections on the trajectory they followed in shifting from a teacher-centered approach to a more student-centered, evidence based teaching practice. We will share the results of a student survey and discuss how the instructor plans to respond to student feedback in future iterations of the course. We will provide examples where feedback was mixed, such as in the peer review exercises, invite participants to share their own experiences with similar strategies, and brainstorm ways to move forward given the contextual constraints.

Cox, M. D. (2004). Introduction to faculty learning communities. New directions for teaching and learning, 97, 5-23.

Prince, M. (2004). Does active learning work? A review of the research. Journal of engineering education, 93, 223-231.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Salon 1

1:45pm

CON03.01 3M Welcome to My Class - Tuning into the fun in teaching – how to stop worrying and embrace creativity
"Take everything you like seriously, except yourselves." Rudyard Kipling

Worry about being taken seriously can wring the fun out of a course and stifle the creativity of teachers and learners. In this interactive workshop we will discuss our experiences of embracing creativity in our teaching across a variety of disciplines in higher education including arts, sciences and medicine. Gardner (2008, p. 162) is firm about the connection between disciplines and creativity: “… creativity goes hand in glove with disciplinary thinking”. Activation of imagination provokes learning because it is meaningful, “sticky,” and memorable (James & Brookfield, 2014). We will briefly review the literature on creativity, discussing a number of techniques for developing new approaches to teaching existing content, and providing examples of how these can be applied in the classroom using approaches described by Pink (2005) and Catmull & Wallace (2014). We will lead a discussion on how to combine unexpected elements to teach in new ways, how to find new angles on old topics and how to find ways to employ fun and creative approaches in seemingly “serious” fields. The workshop includes a live interactive exercise in creativity for the participants. Through interactive exercises and discussion, participants will generate a repertoire of ways to combine unexpected elements of creativity and play in their teaching. 

References:
1. Gardner, H. (2008). 5 Minds for the Future. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

2. James, A., & Brookfield, S. D. (2014). Engaging Imagination: Helping Students Become Creative and Reflective Thinkers. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 

3. Pink, D. H. (2005). A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future. New York, NY: Riverhead.

4. Catmull, E., & Wallace, A. (2014). Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration. New York, NY: Random House.



Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

CON03.02 - Promoting teamwork skills using peer assessment in team-based learning

Teamwork has been identified as a critical professional skill (Hughes, 2011; Kozlowski & Bell, 2003), and is a key learning outcome in undergraduate education (Biggs & Tang, 2011). Research (e.g. Biggs, 1996; Riebe, Roepen, Santarelli & Marchioro, 2010) suggests that deliberately teaching and assessing teamwork is an effective way to build teamwork skills. This workshop will model the use of concept mapping for a mini-team based activity, as a potential method for students to build a common understanding of teamwork. Participants will use our tested teamwork instrument to assess their own and others teamwork skills as demonstrated in the mini-team based activity. This method has been adopted because assessment of teamwork is often inferred from a myriad of attitudes and behaviors, and is sometimes overlooked in favour of assessing a group-based product. This complicates the student and instructor’s ability to develop and track performance of teamwork as an outcome. Identifying performance criteria and behavioral markers indicative of teamwork skills is highly valuable in building the quality of individual student contributions to a team such that targeted feedback can be provided and outcomes improved. In our research, we psychometrically tested the TeamUp rubric (Hastie, Fahy & Parratt, 2014), developed from criteria in the AAC& U teamwork Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) rubric. Peers, class facilitators and research assistants undertook measurement of individual teamwork skills. By using this tool peers were able to provide highly reliable assessment of individual teamwork skills. Furthermore, a modified version of the tool was developed based on the results of these analyses. It is assumed that development and mastery of these skills will enhance student success within the professional sector, by preparing them to be effective team members. Following the workshop activities will be a discussion of the possible application, contextual issues, and institutional implications of assessing teamwork as a desired undergraduate outcome.

References:

Biggs, J. (1996). Enhancing teaching through constructive alignment. Higher education, 32(3), 347-364.

Biggs, J., & Tang, C. (2011). Teaching for quality learning at university. McGraw-Hill International.

Hastie, C., Fahy, K., & Parratt, J. (2014). The development of a rubric for peer assessment of individual teamwork skills in undergraduate midwifery students. Women and Birth, 27(3), 220-226.

Hughes, R. L., & Jones, S. K. (2011). Developing and assessing college student teamwork skills. New Directions for Institutional Research, 2011, 53-64.

Kozlowski, S. W., & Bell, B. S. (2003). Work groups and teams in organizations. Handbook of psychology.

Riebe, L., Roepen, D., Santarelli, B., & Marchioro, G. (2010). Teamwork: effectively teaching an employability skill. Education and Training, 52(6/7), 528-539.




Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon D

3:00pm

CON04.02 - First day boot camp show and tell: How we moved beyond discussing the syllabus
Delivered just prior to a new academic year, MacEwan University’s First Day Boot Camp workshop offers faculty members strategies and activities for engaging students’ attention and encouraging their active involvement in a class, right from day one. Our STLHE session will combine condensed versions of Boot Camp activities we have found most interesting and motivating for faculty, with a look behind the scenes at how our Boot Camp has been built. Participants will have the opportunity to learn strategies both for stimulating student enthusiasm and for designing Boot Camp sessions that succeed in attracting faculty members even during a very busy time of year. Faculty members interested in grabbing students’ attention right from the first day of class will learn about carousel-style graffiti, techniques for managing power dynamics, avoiding information overload, and more. Educational developers seeking to hold similar First Day of Class workshops at their own institutions will benefit from the perspective of the presenters who also designed and facilitate the Boot Camp – an educational developer and two curriculum coordinators, all of whom teach – and the lessons we have learned about creating a session faculty will find appealing and useful.

M. Bart. (2009, July 6). How to use the first day of class to set the tone for entire semester. [Web log article]. Retrieved from http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-classroom-management/how-to-use-the-first-day-of-class-to-set-the-tone-for-entire-semester/

M. Weimer. (2013, January 9). First day of class activities that create a climate for learning. [Web log article.] Retrieved from http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/first-day-of-class-activities-that-create-a-climate-for-learning/

Speakers
avatar for Paul Martin

Paul Martin

Faculty Development Coordinator, MacEwan University


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Bayshore Salon D

3:00pm

CON04.03 - Curricular resonance: Making space for transformative learning through assessment

The relationship between assessment and transformative learning is a complicated and generally under-examined one (Fostaty-Young, 2012). In this session we aim to explore the pedagogical processes at play in the intersection of assessment with transformative learning. Building on Troop’s (2014) work with graduate students, you’ll have the opportunity to examine the relevance to your own instructional context of keyword writing (Luce-Kapler, 2004), critical analysis through journal keeping and other instructional and assessment strategies that have been found to make space for transformative learning. After a brief introduction to the research that informs conceptions of and supports for transformative learning, questions to be explored through guided small group discussion include: How might we use a harmonized (or aligned) curriculum to construct the dissonance that’s a necessary catalyst for transformative learning? How can we then assess (measure and observe) transformative learning? What are the inherent challenges with assessing transformative learning? In what ways does assessment enable and/or constrain the learning process? The intended learning outcomes for the session are that participants will: (a) Identify the inherent challenges and constraints of supporting and assessing transformative learning in their own instructional context and (b) Apply a framework to make curricular space to support the potential for transformative learning to occur and be assessed.

References: 

Fostaty-Young, S. (2012). Transformative Effects of Learning & Assessment Focused Educational Development. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. 

Luce-Kapler, R. (2004). Writing with, through, and beyond the text: An ecology of language. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Troop, M .(2014). Traversing Creative Space, Transforming Higher Education: A Contemporary Curricular View of Teaching and Learning. Unpublished doctoral disseration. Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.



Speakers
avatar for Meagan Troop (University of Guelph)

Meagan Troop (University of Guelph)

Curriculum Consultant for the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation, University of Guelph
SF

Sue Fostaty Young

Educational Developer, Queen's University
Sue is an Educational Developer and the Programs Manager of the Queen's University CTL. Her responsibilities include the development and delivery of programming for graduate students' and post-doctoral fellows' teaching development.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Bayshore Salon EF

3:00pm

CON04.06 - Active eLearning: Adapting established F2F teaching strategies to fit eLearning environments
Active learning techniques are widely used by instructors in face-to-face (F2F) classes in order to engage students in collaborative learning. This session will explore the adaption of F2F active learning strategies to fit eLearning environments. Specifically, the session will focus on a technique that combines Project-Based Learning (PBL) and the jigsaw method. In an eLearning environment, the two methods can be combined seamlessly if instructors can offer the right production tools to students. In this session, I will introduce four teaching tools that can be used to create learning objects by students employing PBL. The four tools are: Zaption, Educreations, Popplet, and VideoScribe. The jigsaw method will be modeled as session participants will be divided into small groups of 3-5. Each group will then examine one of the four teaching tools provided by the facilitator. The ‘experts’ on each tool will then share their expertise and insight with the rest of the session participants. Through eLearning teaching tool analysis, individual and small group work, and facilitated discussion, participants in this session will: (a) examine four eLearning teaching tools that can be used to facilitate active learning in an eLearning environment, (b) identify opportunities for these tools to be used to foster collaborative learning, active learning, or authentic assessment, and (c) use these eLearning teaching tools in their own instruction or introduce them to instructors whom they support.

Aronson, E., Blaney, N., Stephan, C., Sikes, J., & Snapp, M. (1978).The jigsaw classroom. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.

Jonassen, D. H., Davidson, M., Collins, M., Campbell, J., & Haag, B.B.(1995). Constructivism and computer-mediated communication in distance education. The American Journal of Distance Education, 9(2), 7-26. 

King, A. (1993). From sage on the stage to guide on the side. College Teaching, 41(1), 30-35. 

Hung, V.H.K., Keppell, M. & Jong, M.S.Y.(2004). Learners as producers: Using project based learning to enhance meaningful learning through digital video production. In R. Atkinson, C. McBeath, D. Jonas-Dwyer & R. Phillips (Eds), Beyond the comfort zone: Proceedings of the 21stASCILITE Conference (pp. 428-436). Perth, 5-8 December.

Speakers
avatar for Yasmien Mills (University of Victoria)

Yasmien Mills (University of Victoria)

Instructor, University of Victoria and Camosun
I have been an educator in higher ed for about 15 yrs. Recently, I've become more involved in Educational Technology. I have worked in Teaching Support Centres at Western University as well as Royal Roads University. In those roles I focused mostly on faculty development. But I... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Thompson Room

3:00pm

CON04.CreativeDiscussion02 - What if you were an atom? Role playing as a mean to covey practical concepts in applied sciences
Role playing is a form of psychodrama, where individuals act adopted roles, accordingly improvising behavior in a structured setting. Role playing is often used for training professionals or in classrooms with subjects such as law, literature, history, languages, biology and other sciences. In higher education, role playing can be a strategy for student engagement in large classes: even when not all students are directly involved, role playing sessions are powerful means to induce independent thinking and active participation in the whole class. In the authors experience, interesting results have emerged applying role playing to the teaching of physical phenomena or technology apparatuses and processes: guiding students to behave for example as atoms in a water molecule, or electrical charges in a modern computer has very positive implications on class engagement and the understanding of critical concepts.

The discussion is addressed to teachers and teaching staff interested in methodologies for "participatory learning" and students engagement in large classes. The proposal targets a 50-minute deep-dice conversation:

(10 mins) Introducing literature guidelines for role playing in classroom

(20 mins ) Case Studies: description of results emerged applying role playing to the teaching of physical phenomena or technology apparatuses and processes 

(20 mins): DISCUSSION: Attendees are encouraged to (i) comment on feasibility, limitations and benefits of introducing role playing in their area of expertise (ii) discuss the potential of role playing for student engagement and as a way to increase material learning and assessment skills


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm
STLHE Registration Desk

4:00pm

POSTER.33 - Effectiveness of collaborative group work in a first-year Health Sciences course
Group work is frequently used to promote collaboration skills and critical thinking in post-secondary education (Kågesten & Engelbrecht, 2007). The value of group work is well established in professional education and senior level courses in a variety of disciplines; this study examines the group work experience in a first-year undergraduate setting (Bourner et al., 2001; Brown & McIlroy, 2011; Pauli et al., 2008). First year students are unique in that they are just beginning to build conceptual foundations and may lack the confidence in their knowledge base to fully engage in active learning activities for fear of being judged as “not smart”. This poster presentation will outline the findings of a study undertaken to investigate the effect of group work on student learning experience and course outcomes in a first year health sciences course. Specifically, students completed a modified Student Feedback on Group Work questionnaire (SFGWQ) after the completion of a group Journal Club group presentation (Bourner et al., 2001). Overall, students reported a positive learning experience as a result of the group project (82%), and data suggests that this group project contributed to building important collaboration skills; particularly working with others, planning, and time management. 95% of students also reported that the group project helped improve their critical thinking skills. This poster presentation will highlight the benefits and challenges of using group work and tips on how to structure group work to promote a positive learning experience. _x000D_
_x000D_
Bourner, J., Hughes, M., & Bourner, T. (2001). First-year Undergraduate Experiences of Group Project Work. [Article]. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 26(1), 19-39. doi: 10.1080/02602930020022264_x000D_
_x000D_
Brown, C. A., & McIlroy, K. (2011). Group work in healthcare students' education: what do we think we are doing? [Article]. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 36(6), 687-699. doi: 10.1080/02602938.2010.483275_x000D_
_x000D_
Kågesten, O., & Engelbrecht, J. (2007). Student group presentations: a learning instrument in undergraduate mathematics for engineering students. [Article]. European Journal of Engineering Education, 32(3), 303-314. doi: 10.1080/03043790701276833_x000D_
_x000D_
Pauli, R., Mohiyeddini, C., Bray, D., Michie, F., & Street, B. (2008). Individual differences in negative group work experiences in collaborative student learning. [Article]. Educational Psychology, 28(1), 47-58. doi: 10.1080/01443410701413746

Lead Speaker(s)
FA

Fabiola Aparicio-Ting (University of Calgary)

Assistant Director, Health & Society, BHSc program; Instructor, Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary

Speakers

Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.34 - Electronic portfolio assessment: Developing a rubric for student evaluation in a course setting at the undergraduate level
An electronic portfolio (ePortfolio), known at McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario) as the Learning Portfolio, is an online platform for students to organize content to help reflect on and learn from their experiences. Students can include multimedia, such as documents, graphics, and audio files. ePortfolios can be used as an educational tool to support deep learning (Gambino, 2014). Following a review of the literature, Eynon et al. (2014) concluded that: “ePortfolio helps students to construct purposeful identities as learners” (p. 98). Furthermore, ePortfolios are useful in enhancing meaningful learning of curricular (Chang, 2001) and co-curricular content (Brown, 2002). One challenge in the use of ePortfolios is objective assessment in light of the often-subjective nature of artifacts. Since each student, and their learning experience, is unique, the style and content of their portfolios could vary widely. Despite this diversity, students must be assessed using an objective scale. We have developed a rubric to address this need. Our rubric evaluates ePortfolio content on four components: reflections, artifacts, writing mechanics, and professionalism. Reflection assessment includes students viewing their learning experience through a variety of “lenses”: the self lens, a reflection of their personal development; the binoculars, a reflection of their academic and professional development; and the social lens, a reflection of how the educational experience can benefit others on a societal level. Other components evaluate presentation and layout, use of multimedia, and general clarity in meaning and writing. As ePortfolios play a larger role in the post-secondary learning process, finding effective assessment strategies will become increasingly important for successful incorporation into course design and implementation.

Brown, J. O. (2002). Know thyself: The impact of portfolio development on adult learning. Adult Education Quarterly, 52(3), 228-245. doi:10.1177/0741713602052003005

Chang, C. (2001). Construction and evaluation of a web-based learning portfolio system: An electronic assessment tool. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 38(2), 144-155. doi: 10.1080/13558000010030194

Eynon, B., Gambino, L., Torok, J. (2014). What Difference Can ePortfolio Make? A Field Report from the Connect to Learning Project. International Journal of ePortfolio, 4(1), 95-114. Retrieved from http://www.theijep.com/pdf/IJEP127.pdf

Gambino, L. M. (2014). Putting E-Portfolios at the center of our learning. Peer Review, 16(1), 1-8. Retrieved from http://www.niu.edu/p20network/readiness-activities/ePortfolio-materials/Gambino-Peer-Review-2014.pdf


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.36 - Examining changes in faculty teaching and sustainability of changes after professional development
This paper examines the relationship among changes in faculty conceptions, approaches, and practices of teaching after professional development, employing a mixed-method approach, with interviews, surveys, and classroom observations, to triangulate the relationship among faculty conceptions, approaches, and practices of teaching. Conceptions are examined with a semi-structured interview protocol designed to explore participants’ understanding of teaching (Light 2008). The Approaches to Teaching Inventory, a Likert-scale instrument, is used to measure approaches (Trigwell 2004). Instructional practices are analyzed by coding video recordings of classroom sessions with a protocol that tracks observable instructor and student activities in defined time intervals (Smith 2013). Interviews and classroom observations are coded by at least two raters, with inter-rater agreement at greater than 0.7 and 0.8 respectively. Three case studies are chosen because of their different patterns of changes in conceptions of teaching. Two observations emerge from these case studies. First, conceptions of teaching inform instructional practices, whereas approaches can be disconnected. From our data, the three instructors have similar approaches but different conceptions, and their instructional practices have observable differences informed by their conceptions. Second, sustainable changes in practices may be associated with changes in conceptions. One instructor, whose conception did not change, attempted new instructional practices but reverted to transmission-based practices in the second implementation of the course. The other two instructors, who developed acquisition-based and conceptual-change conceptions, sustained their new practices._x000D_
_x000D_
Light G, Calkins S (2008). The experience of faculty development: Patterns of variation in conceptions of teaching. International Journal for Academic Development 13: 27-40._x000D_
Smith MK, Jones FHM, Gilbert SL, Wieman CE (2013). The classroom observation protocol for undergraduate STEM (COPUS): A new instrument to characterize university STEM classroom practices. CBE Life Sciences Education 12: 618-627._x000D_
Trigwell K, Prosser M (2004). Development and use of the approaches to teaching inventory. Educational Psychology Review 16: 409-424.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.37 - Observing TAs’ teaching: Improving practice
Peer teaching observations between graduate students is not a widely adopted practice. This poster will demonstrate how observations conducted by peer mentors observing new TAs were an effective way to provide formative feedback, build confidence and promote professional development. Contributors, experienced TAs and one faculty mentor, identify many aspects associated with conducting teaching observations, such as: 1) introducing new graduate students to this “situated act” (Edgerton, 1991) as academic best practice; 2) that observing does not occur only in the classroom; 3) how kinds of changes – technical, pedagogical, and critical (Bell, 2001) – were required, prevalent, or surprising; and 4) how the initial observation led to new TAs working towards refining aspects of their teaching practice. Suggestions for preparing TAs for teaching observations, including observation protocols and relationship building, are discussed, as well as questions to prompt viewer dialogue. Several handouts will be provided. These will include: observation protocol forms used by contributors, relevant resources to help begin a TA peer observation program.

Bell, M. (2001). Supported reflective practice: a programme of peer observation and feedback for academic development. International Journal for Academic Development, 6 (1) 29-39.

Edgerton, R. (1991). The teaching portfolio as a display of best work. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Higher Education, Washington, DC.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.38 - Prevalence of academic misconduct on written tests: How to measure it and how to stop it!
Self-reports suggest over 50% of Canadian university students cheat at some point in their academic career (Christensen Hughes & McCabe, 2006). A recent survey suggests only a small number of students are punished for cheating, and true values of academic misconduct (AM) are difficult to obtain (Moore, 2014). We had a concern that students were performing AM by altering written tests and resubmitting them for higher grades; thereby compromising the integrity of our current assessment style. Therefore, we objectively quantified the prevalence of AM on written tests in 11 senior courses. All student midterms were scanned and any midterm submitted for re-grading was compared to its original for evidence of AM. Student characteristics, test details, and course information were also recorded. Results show that this form of AM was rare; prevalent on


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.39 - Tuning into practice: Engaging entry-to-practice doctor of pharmacy students using simulation in a physical assessment course
The shift in pharmacy practice to a more advanced role has necessitated the restructuring of programs and course material that include opportunities for students to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in topics such as communication, physical assessment and clinical decision-making (Frankel, Louizos, & Austin, 2014). This shift has provided increased opportunities for the inclusion of innovative educational technologies allowing students to practice clinical skills in a safe environment._x000D_
This poster will describe the evolution of a physical assessment course for students enrolled in an entry-to-practice Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program with an emphasis on the use of simulation in the laboratory component. Observation and course evaluation data suggested that the original delivery methods of lecture followed by practice of assessment in the lab be reworked to better reflect the needs of students in a pharmacy program._x000D_
Conference participants will see examples of techniques used in the course and will be encouraged to share their experiences with the use of simulation._x000D_
Emerging evidence supports the use of simulation in pharmacy education and may include techniques such as role play, case study examples and use of human patient simulators (Skoy, Eukel, & Frenzel, 2013; Vyas, Bray, & Wilson, 2013). Opportunities for students to engage with the course material through the use of case examples and simulation were initiated in every lab. Student feedback was elicited through weekly and course evaluations. Including simulation as part of a physical assessment course may increase student engagement and support a positive impact on future clinical practice.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.40 - Evidence-based recommendations to improve the accuracy of peer-evaluation of written assignments.
Peer-evaluation is used frequently in higher education, as both a supplement to instructor grading (Sho, Schunn & Charney, 2006), and as a replacement to instructor grading (Harris, 2011). Many factors likely contribute to the success of any peer-review activity (skill level, number of assessments etc.), however these are not well defined (Topping, 2010). The accuracy and reliability of peer-evaluations is an important consideration, as research has shown examples at both ends of the spectrum (Sho et al., 2006, Yankulov & Couto, 2012). The objective of this study was to systematically determine which factors (course, assignment and student related) have the strongest influence on the accuracy of peer-assessment. We identified 17 variables and ranked their correlations with accuracy and reliability across three courses from different disciplines that used peer-assessment on written assignments (research proposals, term papers) over four years (>1000 peer-reviews). We then altered the single most significant variable in one course to confirm our prediction. We demonstrate that the number of reviews completed per reviewer has the greatest influence on the accuracy of peer-assessment. Our calculations suggest that six reviews must be completed per reviewer to achieve quantitative peer assessment that is no different from the instructor. Effective training, previous experience and strong academic abilities in the reviewers may reduce this number. This poster will provide evidence based suggestions for instructors to encourage accurate peer-evaluations in their classrooms. Importantly, it will also indentify factors that don’t seem to influence the success of peer-evaluation, allowing flexibility for instructors._x000D_
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References:_x000D_
1. Cho, K., Schunn, C. D., & Charney, D. (2006). Commenting on writing: typology and perceived helpfulness of comments from novice peer reviewers and subject matter experts. Written Communication 23 (3), 260-294._x000D_
2. Harris, J. R. (2011). Peer assessment in large undergraduate classes: and evaluation of a procedure for marking laboratory reports and a review of related practices. Advances in Physiology Education 35, 178-187._x000D_
3. Topping, K. J. (2010). Methodological quandaries in studying process and outcomes in peer assessment. Learning and Instruction 20, 339-343._x000D_
4. Yankulov K, Couto R. (2012). Peer Review in Class: Metrics and Variations in a Senior Course. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, 40 (3), 161-168.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.41 - Using PhotoVoice to learn about complexity and interconnectedness in the context of social inequity and health.
Students studying Health Sciences are often required to take courses that focus on the role that social inequalities play in impacting health. This includes issues related to social structures, culture, and history, such as poverty and oppression. These courses aim to prepare students to understand that both individual and population health are impacted by a range of intersecting social, environmental, and biophysical factors. The interaction between such an array of health determinants makes this a complex issue to learn about, particularly in large undergraduate classes where student engagement and discussion can be difficult to elicit (Hanover Research, 2010; Valerien, 1991). This poster describes the development of a PhotoVoice assignment: a novel method of analysis which uses photography to represent and express points of view and lived realities. PhotoVoice has been used in a variety of university classroom settings (Chandler & Baldwin, 2010; Cook & Rust, 2013). This project was developed to test if a more experiential approach supported student learning outcomes and assisted students in understanding the interconnectedness of the topic. Findings from survey data and focus groups will be outlined on the poster. Participants will also be able to interact with the poster using a QR Code that will take their cell or tablet to a website that contains more information about the project and examples of student work._x000D_
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Learning outcomes:_x000D_
• Understand how PhotoVoice can transition students from an individual to a social perspective._x000D_
• Access resources so that participants can explore these methods in their own practice._x000D_
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References:_x000D_
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Chandler, L., & Baldwin, C. (2010). Views from the Water’s Edge: The Impact of Images in Communicating Perspectives of Climate Change. In M. Raesch (Ed.), Mapping Minds, pp. 95-106. Oxford, UK: Interdisciplinary Press._x000D_
Cook, K., & Rust, C. (2013). Connecting to Our Community: Utilizing PhotoVoice as a Pedagogical Tool to Connect College Students to Science. International Journal of Environmental & Science Education, 8(2), 339–357._x000D_
Hanover Research. (2010). Strategies for Teaching Large Undergraduate Classes. Retrieved January 22, 2015 from https://www.baruch.cuny.edu/facultyhandbook/documents/LargeClasses_StrategiesforTeaching.pdf_x000D_
Valerien, J. (1991). Innovations for Large Classes: A Guide for Teachers and Administrators. Paris: UNESCO.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.42 - Understanding the curve: Implications of norm-referenced grading in large introductory science courses
Curving grades in introductory science courses is a common practice, with approximately half of chemistry and physics professors and one-quarter of biology professors reporting that they grade on a curve (Goubeaud, 2010). Proponents argue curving accounts for changes in the difficulty of exams, guards against grade inflation, and is a tool for ranking students and evaluating potential for graduate school (Sadler, 2005). However, critics argue that curving grades does not provide a valid measure of the degree of content mastery (Goubeaud, 2010). Despite the contentious debate over whether curving student grades is a valid assessment strategy, little empirical research has examined this practice. We will present the results of our study which examined the effects of curving introductory chemistry grades at a large, four-year university using data from over 16,000 students enrolled between 2008 and 2013. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to model students’ chemistry course grades as function of individual- and class-level characteristics. Results indicate that students’ grades were associated not only with their own prior achievement, but also with the prior achievement of students in their class. Being in a class with students who scored higher on the SAT and chemistry placement exam was associated with a decrease in student grades. This suggests that, as a result of curving, student grades are not representative of their own competency.Because the distribution of students varies substantially across classes, curving artificially deflates students’ grades in higher-achieving classes and inflates grades in lower-achieving classes. 

Goubeaud, K. (2010). How is science learning assessed at the postsecondary level? Assessment and grading practices in college biology, chemistry and physics. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 19(3), 237-245.

Sadler, D. R. (2005). Interpretations of criteria‐based assessment and grading in higher education. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 30(2), 175-194.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.43 - You can’t change what you can’t measure: Measuring teaching practices and student learning to promote improvement in introductory science classes
In order improve, we have to be able to measure, but measurement in introductory science courses has often been limited to examinations designed for grading purposes and course evaluations to assess instructor effectiveness. The data from these measures do not provide the comprehensive understanding of student learning and pedagogy that is needed to promote change and improve student learning. We have expanded assessment efforts in introductory science courses at a large 4-year institution to focus on students’ conceptual understanding of course material, students’ mindsets, pedagogical approaches, and classroom interactions. Conceptual understanding is measured through assessments that are aligned with individual course learning goals. Student mindsets are assessed using the C-LASS (Adams et al., 2006) to assess the extent of expert thinking. Finally, pedagogical approaches and classroom interactions are measured using the General Observation and Reflection Tool, an application to record observations and reflections related to learning activities (Smith et al., 2013). Measures are implemented throughout the course in order to assess outcomes and quantify change. The triangulation of these instruments, in conjunction with regular classroom assessments, student characteristics and prior achievement provide a thorough picture of course instruction and student learning. This allows instructors and departments to measure change and make evidence-based decisions. We will present an overview of the tools and assessment strategies that have been used to measure student learning and pedagogical approaches at our institution, and how these measures have promoted change. 

Adams, W. K., Perkins, K. K., Podolefsky, N. S., Dubson, M., Finkelstein, N. D., & Wieman, C. E. (2006). New instrument for measuring student beliefs about physics and learning physics: The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey. Physical Review Special Topics-Physics Education Research, 2(1), 010101.

Smith, M. K., Jones, F. H., Gilbert, S. L., & Wieman, C. E. (2013). The classroom observation protocol for undergraduate STEM (COPUS): a new instrument to characterize university STEM classroom practices. CBE-Life Sciences Education, 12(4), 618-627.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer
 
Thursday, June 18
 

10:30am

CON05.03 - Constructing integrated testlets across disciplines

An integrated testlet (IT) is a new tool which assesses students’ understanding of complex ideas (Anderson & Krawthohl, 2001) through a set of scaffolded multiple-choice items, each adopting an answer-until-correct format. Students answer each item within an IT until the correct answer is revealed to them, and they then advance to the next item with full knowledge of, and benefit from, answers to previous items. ITs can be valid and efficient replacements for free-response questions, as they assess complex cognitive processes while also rewarding partial knowledge (Slepkov & Shiell, 2014). The extent of scaffolding within an IT, denoted the “testlet integration”, can vary from weakly- to strongly-integrated, depending upon how much the instructor desires previous items within an IT to assist students in answering later items (Shiell & Slepkov, 2015). ITs were originally conceived within strongly-cumulative disciplines such as physics and math and now find themselves at a pivotal point, awaiting widespread adoption across other disciplines. In this session, we shall first introduce the purpose and some advantages of ITs, and then engage delegates, as teaching experts in their own field, in considering ITs within their discipline. By the end of this collaborative conversation delegates will have learned how their discipline can benefit, and to what extent, from ITs, and also contributed to the discussion of whether the extent of testlet integration is necessarily discipline-specific.



Anderson, L.W. & Krathwohl, D.R. (Eds.) (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives. New York: Longman.

Slepkov, A.D. & Shiell, R. C. (2014). Comparison of integrated testlet and constructed-response question formats. Physical Review Special Topics - Physics Education Research, 10, 020120. http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.10.020120

Shiell, R.C. & Slepkov, A. D. (2015). Integrated testlets: A new form of expert-student collaborative testing. Collected Essays on Learning and Teaching, 8, 31-40 (in press).



Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am
Thompson Room

10:30am

CON05.06 - Integrating community based learning and research into undergraduate teaching
Universities are under increasing pressure to develop program outcomes that relate student learning to the ‘real world’. Community based learning and research (CBLR) provides students with opportunities to relate their classroom learning to community interests, developing their competencies and skills as practitioners of their discipline. A substantial body of research (e.g., Conway, Amel, & Gerwien, 2009; Yorio & Ye, 2012) has demonstrated the benefits of CBLR on student learning; well-designed CBLR courses and programs contribute to the academic, personal, social, and civic development of students.

The objective of this session is to demonstrate the integration of CBLR into undergraduate courses and programs. Participants will be provided with examples of courses that involve local and global community partners and vary in the degree to which they incorporate CBLR. Challenges, solutions, and rewards associated with the implementation of CBLR (Hondagneu-Sotelo & Raskoff, 1994) will be considered.

During the session, speakers will share their experiences as instructors who have taught CBLR courses and as Associate Deans who have advocated for the integration of CBLR into the core curriculum of their faculty. In breakout groups moderated by session speakers, participants will share their experiences, and get feedback on strategies to implement CBLR into their courses and programs. The session will conclude with a summary of the most salient ideas and themes that emerged for participants during the session.

References 

Conway, J. M., Amel, E. L., & Gerwien, D. P. (2009). Teaching and learning in the social context: A meta-analysis of service learning’s effects on academic, personal, social, and citizenship outcomes. Teaching of Psychology, 36, 233-245.

Hondagneu-Sotelo, P., & Raskoff, S. (1994). Community service-learning: Promises and problems. Teaching Sociology, 22, 248–254.

Yorio, P. L., & Ye, F. F. (2012). A meta-analysis on the effects of service-learning on the social, personal, and cognitive outcomes of learning. Academy of Management Learning and Education, 11, 9-27.


Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am
Salon 1

11:30am

CON06.02 - Designing and implementing meaningful assessments
Learning effective research, analytical, and written communication skills are crucial to the development of competent graduates across disciplines. Yet the means by which evaluations cultivate or appraise these skills are limitless. Effective assessments vary according to subject, class size, composition, level, and so on, although at their core, pedagogically sound evaluations should align with the learning objectives of any given course or program. To be perceived as worthwhile, however, these arrangements must also be relevant to, and advance, students’ educational and vocational aspirations. Instructors are increasingly compelled to meet two, sometimes competing, obligations in their courses: to provide flexible and responsive learning opportunities for all students while also adhering to specific and measurable learning outcomes. This session will explore approaches instructors can use to improve the impact of their assignments without multiplying their workload or compromising the integrity of their learning outcomes. Drawing on specific examples from our teaching, including the use of individual learning plans and creative projects, we will outline how evaluations can be constructed to maintain rigor and enhance course-related learning. This is a participatory session intended to provide an overview of successful assessment design and implementation strategies. While we will present a couple approaches instructors can use to create meaningful assessments, significant emphasis will be placed on attendees sharing ideas and resources concerning implementation, challenges surrounding the use of specific forms of evaluation, and potential obstacles to effective execution.


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Bayshore Salon D

11:30am

CON06.12 - Sources of inspiration: Tuning into specialized student needs for new approaches to teaching and learning
Many of the “high notes” in higher education lie in transformative learning (Mezirow, 1997) and threshold knowledge (Meyer & Land, 2005). Students often view their instructors as the conductor leading them through these transformative moments to changes in perception. Yet, there are times when this dynamic is reversed – when the students lead the way towards new teaching approaches. These are rich opportunities that we, as instructors, can miss if we are not “tuned in” to the potential insights revealed when students struggle with course content. This workshop highlights examples from four different subjects within two disciplinary contexts (English and Biological Sciences) in which the broader pedagogical approach to a subject was modified as a result of “tuning in” to the learning challenges students encountered. In English, strategies were developed for students who were facing language proficiency issues. In molecular biology, human anatomy and physiology, accommodations were developed for a visually impaired student. The common chord among the disciplines was that the accommodation for these individuals resulted in the development of better pedagogical models for the broader classroom population. In addition to seeing various discipline-specific examples, this hour-long interactive session will require participants to engage in the learning activity developed for the visually impaired student. Participants will also have the opportunity to share their own experiences with meeting specialized needs, and work with the presenters to see how those attempts may (or may not) lead towards a new pedagogical model. 

References:

Meyer, J. H. F., & Land, R. (2005). Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge (2): Epistemological considerations and a conceptual framework for teaching and learning. Higher Education, 49 (3), 373 – 388. doi:10.1007/s10734-004-6779-5 

Mezirow, J. (1997). Transformative learning: Theory to practice. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, (74), 5–12. doi:10.1002/ace.7401

Speakers
avatar for Richelle Monaghan (Wilfrid Laurier University)

Richelle Monaghan (Wilfrid Laurier University)

Assistant Professor, Head of Science Programming in Public Health, Wilfrid Laurier University


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Cypress 1 Room

1:45pm

RTD.11 - 'You learn no matter what happens': Approaches to harmonizing assessment of situated learning with discipline practice and situational realities
In situated learning scenarios student learning opportunities arise in unexpected ways. In such cases, learning objectives, assessment, evaluation, course organization and teaching strategies do not follow traditional models. The challenge for educators is to identify and capitalize on these opportunities while harmonizing assessment and evaluation with learning objectives and a changing context. Our curriculum includes industry-sponsored project courses in Information Technology that give students the opportunity to solve real-life problems in a discipline-specific manner. These courses are offered to large classes of 100+ students organized in teams of four with each team assigned an industry client who outlines a project, and a faculty supervisor who provides assessment, evaluation and practical guidance. Several theories apply: situated learning theory (Lave & Wenger, 1991; McLellan, 1995), experiential learning theory (Kolb, 1984), and elements of problem- and project-based learning. Course learning objectives are the same for all students and must be assessed and evaluated fairly despite changing situational realities as we deal with a significant degree of variability in many aspects including the level of technical difficulty, project-specific requirements and supervision. Students and participants in course delivery (i.e., instructor, supervisors and clients) play discipline-specific roles. Besides innovation in course organization and teaching strategies, we developed a high-level formative assessment marking schema with components that supervisors adapt as required. Participants will learn about our innovative solution and how this model could be adapted and applied to their specific discipline. This roundtable would be most interesting to instructors of courses with practical components and curriculum developers.

Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Kolb, D. A. (1984) Experiential Learning, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

McLellan, H. (1995). Situated learning perspectives. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications.



Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

RTD.12 - An investigation of students’ engagement with peers and assigned readings in annotation-enhanced discussion forums
Engaging with texts by scribbling comments in the margins is an ancient tradition (Howard, 2005). Online discussions can be enhanced by allowing students to use annotation tools to do just that—insert comments in the margins beside the excerpt of interest rather than posting a reply at the bottom of the post (Xin, Glass, Feenberg, Bures, & Abrami, 2011). The purpose of our study was to examine how students commented on each other’s written responses to course readings in annotation-enhanced online discussion forums, and how this process contributed to their learning. To facilitate students’ critical engagement with readings, we implemented an instructional process called the “triple-entry notebook” (Kooy & Kanevsky, 1996) that required them to prepare a response to each reading that included a summary, selected highlights with reflections, and a lingering question. Classmates posted their responses and commented on each other’s in small groups on a discussion forum augmented with an annotation tool called Marginalia. This tool allowed students to highlight text and write notes in the margin of classmates’ responses, just as readers might underline and annotate a book. Data were collected from 17 students in a post-baccalaureate Education course. Many students exceeded the required contributions and all reported no difficulty making the required contributions to the online discussion. Patterns of interaction among classmates emerged that demonstrated they engaged in true, multi-voice, multi-comment discussions rather than posting individual isolated remarks. The depth of their engagement varied depending on the composition of the group. We will present our results, share our instructional materials, and engage attendees in a discussion of how such instructional practices and enhanced discussion forums can be used to facilitate critical reading of literature and active engagement with classmate’s understandings online. 

References:

Kooy, M., & Kanevsky, L. S. (1996). Making meaning from assigned readings: A process for using the triple-entry notebook in teacher education. Teaching Education, 8(1), 45-54.

Howard, J. (2005). Scholarship on the edge. The Chronicle of Higher Education. 

Xin, C., Glass, G., Feenberg, A., Bures, E., & Abrami, P. (2011). From active reading to active dialogue: An investigation of annotation—enhanced online discussion forums. In F. Pozzi & D. Persico, Techniques for fostering collaboration in online learning communities (p. 300-318). Hershey, NY: Information Science Reference.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

RTD.13 - Critical reflection: "How to" guide for providing feedback
Introduction: Reflective capacity has been identified as an essential component of professional practice. Reflection often needs to be ‘taught’ to assist students to develop this habit for future practice. Health professional students are often provided with many opportunities for developing reflective capacity. However, taking students to a deeper more meaning experience of “critical reflection” requires explicit teaching and appropriate provision of feedback in order to support student learning (Aronson, 2011). 

Participant Outcomes: Through round table discussion, participants will be introduced to examples of learning activities that use critical reflection as an assessment point as well as how it is used to develop synthesis of learning within practice based courses. Review of the literature on the role of providing feedback to student’s reflective writing will be addressed. The session will focus on introducing some approaches for guiding student reflective writing; techniques for developing grading rubrics as well be introduced to techniques for giving written feedback. Participants will critique several samples of reflective writing using a variety of approaches.

Practice Implications: Appreciation of the importance of formative feedback on student narrative writing will help participants to develop their own framework and rubric and “Critical reflection writing guide” to take back to their own academies. Conclusions: Reflection is an important part of practice. Developing reflective capacity skills requires some explicit teaching as well as faculty development in the area of providing feedback to the reflections to help learners scaffold their experiences into best practices and work toward solidifying their discipline specific knowledge, skills and attitudes.

References:

Aronson, L. (2010). Twelve Tips For Teaching Reflection At All Levels Of Medical Education. Medical Teacher, 33(3), 200-205.

Fook, J., & Gardner, F. (2007). Practising critical reflection a resource handbook. Maidenhead: Open University Press.

Reidsema, C. & Mort, P. (2009). Assessing reflective writing: Analysis of reflective writing in an engineering design course. Journal of Academic Language & Learning. 3(2), A117-A129.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

RTD.14 - Crowdsourcing social learning and business education assessment
The business education community is under growing pressure to engage in significant reforms in the face of globalization, new learning technologies, soaring tuitions, and unprecedented economic uncertainty. One approach being adopted is to engage faculty and students in a crowdsourcing learning experience. Specifically, this new paradigm significantly alters the three pillars of traditional instruction — fixed time, fixed location, and fixed learning pace—with a more flexible, customized, and mobile learning environment. Crowdsourcing, as applied to business education, involves the process of connecting with a broad-based group of external resources, e.g., students, faculty, researchers, and the business community, for the general purpose of problem solving and developing new skill sets. Specifically, crowdsourcing can open up multiple options for adding new dimensions to learning and knowledge acquisition by allowing students to connect in both formal and informal learning settings. This pattern tends to mimic the increasing use of crowdsourcing in the workplace. In an academic setting, crowdsourcing, among other things, provides access to previously inaccessible intellectual capital. The challenge of student learning assurance represents a key success factor as business schools continue the transition to Online learning. The learning objectives of this session include: 1) To highlight the dramatic changes occurring in business education, 2) To demonstrate how crowdsourcing can improve the learning process, and 3) To introduce a new crowdsourcing based methodology for learning outcome assessment and accountability that addresses meaning, quality and integrity in a wholistic approach.

Anderson, M. (2011). Crowdsourcing higher education: A design proposal for distributed learning. MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 7(4), 576-590.

Sharma, P. (2011). Crowdsourcing in Higher Education IT, Educause Quarterly, 34(3).

Thomas, M.& Thomas, H. (2012). Using new social media and Web 2.0 technologies in business school teaching and learning. Journal of Management Development, 31(4), 358-368.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

RTD.15 - Examining patterns of effective teaching practices across disciplinary areas
Variation in the use of effective teaching practices across disciplinary areas can be an impediment to improving undergraduate education but can also provide an opportunity for dialog. Using data from the 2013 and 2014 administrations of the Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE), this session will explore the similarities and differences in patterns of engaging teaching practices across disciplinary fields for instructors in Canada and the United States. FSSE measures instructor perceptions and expectations of undergraduate student engagement in educationally purposeful activities and the extent to which instructors promote student learning and development in their courses at four-year colleges and universities. The focus of engaging teaching practices examined in this session will be the value instructors place on students participating in reflective and integrative learning activities, instructor emphasis on higher-order learning activities, and the opportunity students have to engage in discussions with diverse others. During this session, participants will 1) learn about a method for measuring instructor engagement in effective teaching practices, 2) examine and discuss patterns in engaging teaching practices across disciplinary fields for instructors at Canadian institutions, 3) consider how these patterns compare to those of instructors in the United States, and 4) discuss what these patterns say about the different teaching contexts and fields and what that means for efforts to improve undergraduate education. Understanding the similarities and differences in disciplinary cultures in different contexts may help make sense of the disciplinary dissonance and shed light on how to achieve teaching and learning improvement across contexts.

Biglan, A. (1973a) The characteristics of subject matter in different scientific areas. Journal of Applied Psychology, 57, 195–203.

Braxton, J. M. & Hargens, L.L. (1996). Variation among academic disciplines: Analytical frameworks and research. In J. Smart & W.J. Tierney (Eds.), Higher education: Handbook of research and theory, XI (pp. 1– 46). New York: Agathon Press. 

Nelson Laird, T. F., Shoup, R., Kuh, G. D., & Schwarz, M. J. (2008). The effects of discipline on deep approaches to student learning and college outcomes. Research in Higher Education, 49, 469-494.

Smart, J. C., Feldman, K. A., & Ethington, C. A. (2000). Academic disciplines: Holland's theory and the study of college students and faculty. Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press.



Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

RTD.16 - Incorporate effective teaching and learning techniques in large science classrooms to help first year university students transition
There is a high attrition rate for first year university students in Canada that less than 80% of students would continue to their second year of study; in engineering and science, the attrition rate is even higher (Grayson and Grayson, 2003). Daempfle (2003) suggests the differences in faculty and epistemological expectations between high schools and post-secondary institutions may play an important role in the high attrition rates in science and engineering. Wieman and Perkins (2005) discuss how they transformed physics education by focusing on understanding and appreciation of the subject. McGuire and Hoffman (2009) discuss the teaching and learning strategies they used to teach students how to learn chemistry; in particular, they emphasize the importance of active engagement, being empathy, and empowerment in teaching. While these techniques are known to be effective, how can educators incorporate these methods in large science classes to teach first year students to be competent learners? In this workshop, we will first do a few interactive activities to understand the importance of learning skills including understanding the concept, practicing the problem, and monitoring the understanding. Then, we will look at several real life examples of incorporating these techniques in large science classes. Participants are expected to learn the effective teaching and learning skills that are essential in science, engineering and other disciplines. Further, they will gain knowledge of applying these practices in their teaching to help first year university students transition from high schools. 

References:

Daempfle, P. A. (2003). An Analysis of the High Attrition Rates among First Year College Science, Math, and Engineering Majors. J. College Student Retention, 5(1), 37-52.

Grayson, J. P. & Grayson, K. (2003). Research on Retention and Attrition. Montreal, QC: Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation

McGuire, S. Y. & Hoffman, R. (2009). Teaching and Learning Strategies that Work. Science, 325, 1203-1204.

Wieman, C. & Perkins, K. (2005). Transforming Physics Education. Physics Today, 58(11), 36-41.

Speakers
SC

Stephen Cheng

Dr. Stephen Cheng is the Faculty Associate of the Centre for Teaching and Learning at the University of Regina.



Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

RTD.17 - Is fine tuning possible with grade-focused students?
In our service-learning courses, students work with real people and record and reflect on these experiences, to learn appropriate professional behavior, and how to think creatively and respond to changing circumstances. Many of our students are “strategic” learners, characterized by alertness to assessment and intention to achieve the highest possible grades (Entwistle et al., 2000). They display a need to be correct that overrides the opportunity to explore ideas, trouble shoot and problem solve. Additionally, the slavish allegiance to one correct answer prevents many from engaging in the ‘messy’ processes of trial and error, formative feedback and assessment, reflection and refinement (Dewey, 1938). They not only avoid the benefits of proximal learning, they also deny themselves the benefits of ‘cognitive play’ that Vygotsky (1962) encourages. An ‘end of term binge’, their rush to get work done at the eleventh hour, can occur because many seem reluctant to take advantage of formative feedback opportunities (i.e. fine tuning) during the term. Accompanying this binge is the concomitant expectation of immediate feedback from the instructor and the equally unrealistic expectation of their own spontaneous comprehension of the material without adequate assimilation time. In our session we will provide participants with a summary of formative assessment examples (Nicol & Macfarlane-Dick, 2006) and invite discussion and suggestions about the pros and cons of each, as well as implementation strategies that enhance student motivation and timely engagement.


Dewey, J. (1938) Experience and Education. New York: Kappa Delta Pi.

Entwistle, N., Tait, H. & McCune, V. (2000). Patterns of response to an approaches to studying inventory across contrasting groups and contexts. European Journal of Psychology of Education, XV(1), 33-48.

Nicol, D. & Macfarlane-Dick, D. (2006). Formative assessment and self-regulated learning: A model and seven principles of good feedback practice. Studies in Higher Education, 31(2), 199-218.

Vygotsky, L.S. (1962). Thought and language (E. Hanfmann & G. Vakar, Trans.). Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.



Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

RTD.18 - Making Assessments COUNT: A framework for relevant and efficient assessment for learning
Developing assessments that are relevant, efficient and are constructively aligned (Biggs, 2014) creates, to use a music term, "harmony". During this round table, we will share our newly developed framework for assessment that integrates evidence-based best practices (e.g. Knaack, 2011) with an easy-to-remember acronym, COUNT. The acronym COUNT is comprised of the elements Credible, On Target, Unambiguous, Navigable, and Timely, and aligns with the acronym SMART, that is used for well-written learning objectives (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, Timely). We look forward to discussion about how assessments are developed by instructors, how good assessment is taught and supported by educational developers, and how the COUNT framework might be useful in your context.

Biggs, J. (2014). Constructive Alignment in university teaching. HERDSA Review of Higher Education. Volume 1 (July). Pp. 5-22 http://www.herdsa.org.au/?page_id=3745

Boud, D. & Falchikov, N. (2007) Rethinking assessment in higher education: Learning for the longer term. New York, NY: Routledge.

Knaack, L. (2011). A practical handbook for educators: Designing learning opportunities. Whitby, ON: DeSitter Publications.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Hoessler

Carolyn Hoessler

Program and Curriculum Development Specialist, GMCTE at the University of Saskatchewan
Carolyn Hoessler (Program and Curriculum Specialist) is a program and curriculum development specialist with 8 years of educational development experience. Her areas of specialty and focus include supporting faculty with curricular innovation, assessment of program outcomes, program... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

RTD.19 - Student evaluation of teaching response rates
Many higher education institutions have moved or are moving from print based to online student evaluation of teaching surveys. The aim of this discussion is to share strategies universities are using to increase these rates. The session will start with sharing examples of successful and unsuccessful strategies used by both co-facilitators and quickly move to drawing on the experiences of participants. By the end of the session participants should have many practical ways to increase the response rate for online student evaluation of teaching at their home institution.

Nulty, D. D. (2008). The adequacy of response rates to online and paper surveys: What can be done? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 33, 301-314.

Porter, S. R., & Umbach, P. D. (2006). Student survey response rates across institutions: Why do they vary? Research in Higher Education, 47, 229-247

Speakers
avatar for Peter Arthur

Peter Arthur

University of British Columbia Okanagan
avatar for Gary Hunt

Gary Hunt

Coordinator, Teaching and Learning Support, Thompson Rivers University
TRU


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

RTD.20 - Teaching a blended course: The possibilities and the challenges
Many post-secondary institutions are facilitating the increased demand for higher education and the perceived convenience associated with asynchronous learning by offering blended learning. Moving to blended learning involves a process of converting face-to-face classes to blended (hybrid) classes, while maintaining the integrity of the former course. This conversion to blended learning, though not always straightforward, can be successful after identifying existing and required course content and material, which are essential for successful learning outcomes. To encourage these learning outcomes and maximize successful conversion of face-to-face classes to blended ones, we need to examine case studies of courses that allowed for positive learning outcomes in a supportive learning environment. Therefore, the purpose of this session is for participants to explore case studies and discuss the possibilities and challenges involved in converting a face-to-face class to a blended one, while exploring the:

1. dynamics that facilitate successful course conversion;
2. pedagogical implications of changing the delivery mode; and 
3. barriers encountered when moving courses to an online space.

References:

Baran, E., Correia, A-P., Thompson, A.D. Tracing Successful Online Teaching in Higher Education: Voices of Exemplary Online Teachers. Teachers College Record 115, March 2013, 1-41.

Carbonell, Katerina Bohle, Dailey-Hebert, A., Gijselaers W. Unleasing the Creative Potential of Faculty to Create Blended Learning. Internet and Higher Education 18, 2013, 29-37.

Cowan, P., Neil P.S., Winter E. A Connectivist Perspective of the Transition from Face-to-Face to Online Teaching in Higher Education. International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning 8(1), March 2013, 10-19.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

RTD.21 - Would you prefer bento or buffet? Two systems of flexible grading
Between fully self-regulated learning, in which individual students and their instructor negotiate and agree on all aspects of assessment (e.g. tasks, methods, weightings, timelines, grading criteria), and traditional assessment systems which are completely instructor-based and uniform, there are many potential flexible grading systems. Zarzeski (1998), Cook (2001), and Pacharn, Bay, and Felton (2013) provide models and show that student engagement/learning increases under flexible grading. I will present two other such systems which I call “bento” and “buffet”: each allows students choices which increase motivation and allow self-reflection on academic abilities, while not significantly increasing instructor time required to implement assessment. I developed both systems for use in Literature courses beyond the freshman level with criterion-based grading, some of them large classes with Teaching Assistants. In the bento system students have identical assessments and due dates but choose from weighting options, while in the buffet students choose from a list of assessments and also assign their own due dates and weightings in the final grade. I find little change to the grade curve in the bento box system. Diligent students may achieve slightly higher grades using the buffet system, though procrastinators tend to suffer: the grade curve flattens slightly. Students report more engagement and satisfaction with the buffet system, and it is the one I prefer. 

Cook, A. (2001). Assessing the use of flexible assessment. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 26(6), 539-549. 

Pacharn, P., Bay, D., & Felton, S. (2013). The impact of a flexible assessment system on students' motivation, performance and attitude. Accounting Education: an international journal, 22(2), 147-167. DOI: 10.1080/09639284.2013.765292.

Zarzeski, M.T. (1998). The use and benefit of flexible student contracts. Issues in Accounting Education, 13(3), 585-594.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

RTD.22 - From practice to harmony: Teaching leadership chairs
Like the Canada Research Chair program that encourages specialization and mobilization through essential research initiatives nationwide, the Teaching Leadership Chair program aims to spearhead chief initiatives in teaching and learning on the local, national, and international stages. By eliciting funds from institutions and organizations, leadership chairs may be funded for a single or multiple year term whereby they outline how they will accomplish a series of goals, how they will disseminate their results to the wider community, and how they will impact the scope of teaching and learning both short and long term. The notion of teaching leadership chairs has grown now to several institutions across Canada; and these programs encourage and facilitate the improvement of teaching and learning in post-secondary education in Canada. We will outline the process and successes (and challenges) through the Teaching Leadership Program at our institution, which ushered in several leadership chairs, with topics ranging from Peer Collaboration, International Faculty Development, Flipped Classrooms, Learning Modules, and several others. We will further share the outcomes and experiences from our May 2015 symposium at a recent international conference. Our hope with this interactive presentation is to facilitate a dynamic dialogue on initiatives made at other institutions, and their relative success stores plus their challenges. Although our central theme sits squarely with Leadership in Teaching and Learning, several other themes are enveloped by this discussion, including Teaching, assessment and evaluation; Educational development; Learning environments & technology integration, etc.

Filan, G. L. (1999). The need for leadership training: The evolution of the chair academy. New Directions for Community Colleges, 105, 47-55.

Leithwood, K. A., Mascall, B., & Strauss, T. (2009). Distributed Leadership According to the Evidence (Eds.). Oxon, UK: Routledge.

Porter, G. P., & Smith, D. (2012). Exploring Inclusive Educational Practices Through Professional Inquiry (Eds.). Rotterdam, Netherlands: Sense Publishing.

Speakers
avatar for Judy AK Bornais

Judy AK Bornais

Experiential Learning Specialist, Teaching Leadership Chair, University of Windsor
Judy Bornais is currently an Experiential Learning Specialist with the Faculty of Nursing. She feels that teaching has been at the core of her work as a practitioner and academic. Teaching nursing students appealed to Judy as an opportunity to make a broader contribution to health... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

RTD.23 - Interdisciplinary approaches to problem-based (PBL) learning: A case study of law and literature in an undergraduate classroom
One of the key values of transformative pedagogy is to extend learning outside of the classroom. In this session, I will discuss an interdisciplinary experiential project where students in a 200 level (2nd year) undergraduate literature course (ENG223 Elizabethan Shakespeare) prosecuted Shakespeare for fraud in the Canadian Criminal Court system. Inspired by the renewed debates about Shakespeare and authorship (cf. Anonymous, 2011; the MA in Shakespeare Authorship Studies at Brunel University, UK; the rise of the Shakespeare Authorship Coalition), students from ENG223 Elizabethan Shakespeare, contributed to the trial as legal researchers. Students were trained on research methodologies during two sessions in the library’s interactive training lab. Trial teams built their arguments based on the established research produced by the team of legal researchers. This conference presentation outlines the several phases of the project and outlines the learning outcomes measured - both quantitatively and qualitatively - for the students and participants.

Gillespie, Alisdair A. (2007). “Mooting for Learning,” Journal of Commonwealth Law and Legal Education, Volume 5, Issue 1, April 2007. Pp. 19-37.

Kennedy, Ruth R. (2009). “The power of in-class debates.” Active Learning in Higher Education. November 2009 vol. 10 no. 3. Pp. 225-236.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm

RTD.24 - The art and science of experiential learning: A liberal education approach to an academic microbrewery
The Bishop's Arches Brewery, Bishop's University's on-campus teaching and research microbrewery, is Canada’s first liberal education focussed academic microbrewery. Our primary objective is to research the art and science of beer making in an interdisciplinary, experiential approach that is local and grounded in the Eastern Townships community. During this session, we will outline the several phases of the project, from its inception to its current state as a centre for experiential learning. We will discuss the challenges of teaching science to both science and non-science students through interactions in the classrooms, labs, and internship opportunities. Finally, we will explore how brewing beer is a metaphor for transformative learning.

Korolija, Jasminka N.; Plavsic, Jovica V.; Marinkovic, Dragan; Mandic, Ljuba M. (2012). “Beer as a Teaching Aid in the Classroom and Laboratory.” Journal of Chemical Education, v89 n5 p605-609 Apr 2012. 5 pp.

Beck-Winchatz, Bernhard; Parra, Ruben D. (2013). “Finding Out What They Really Think: Assessing Non-Science Majors; Views of the Nature of Science.” College Teaching, v61 n4 p131-137 2013. 7 pp.

---. (2008). “Field Trips Put Chemistry in Context for Non-Science Majors.” Journal of  Chemical Education, v85 n5 p645-649 May 2008. 5 pp.

---. (2009). “Visualization and Interactivity in the Teaching of Chemistry to Science and Non-Science Students.” Chemistry Education Research and Practice, v10 n1 p62-69 2009. 8 pp.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

3:00pm

CON07.05 - The rewards (& risks) of alternative assignments for senior students
In senior level English courses (3rd and 4th year), I have often provided an opportunity for students to submit a project – a “creative alternative” - in lieu of a formal essay. The rough criteria for these projects involves: 1. engaging with the course material; 2. being theoretically and intellectually rigorous and 3. presenting that engagement with the material in a creative way. Beyond those broad guidelines, students individually propose and negotiate their project’s format with the instructor. Historically, the benefits of this type of learner-centered approach have increased student motivation (Hong, Milgram, & Rowell, 2004), discouraged plagiarism (Cummings, 2003) and increased learning in traditionally difficult subjects (Guilaran, 2012). In my courses, students have turned in everything from quilts, to paintings, to cookbooks, to videos, to food…the list is as long as it is varied. The educational and personal reward (for the students and myself) has been outstanding, though there are some important pedagogical issues at stake, including how to establish the assessment criteria in an equitable manner and how to manage any overly-personal revelations that might occur. In attending this workshop, participants will be inspired by several examples of student’s creative projects; gain insight into how to incorporate them within their own discipline; learn about the types of educational and personal rewards that they offer; and dialogue about the various challenges they pose with emphasis on assessment criteria and negotiating difficult emotional terrain.

Hong, E., Milgram, R., & Rowell, L. (2004). Homework motivation and preference: a learner-centered homework approach. Theory into Practice, 43(3), 198-204. http://www.jstor.org.libproxy.wlu.ca/stable/3701521?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

Cummings, K. (2003). Pushing against plagiarism through creative assignments. Library Media Connection. 21(6), 22-23. Cummings, K. (2003). Pushing against plagiarism through creative assignments. Library Media Connection. 21(6), 22-23.

Guilaran, I. (2012). Creativity and introductory physics. The Physics Teacher. 50(42), 42-44. http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.3670085


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Thompson Room

3:00pm

CON07.08 - Making the case: Building capacity for case-based learning
Using case studies can be a highly effective teaching tool to engage students and teach higher-level critical thinking and analysis skills (Dunne & Brooks, 2004). Case-Based Learning (CBL) allows students to develop a collaborative approach to learning; fosters integrated learning; and promotes self-assessment, reflection and life-long learning (Williams, 2005). Interest in using cases as real world examples in undergraduate and graduate teaching has been increasing among instructors at our institution. However, instructor definitions of what a “case” is vary, as do methods used when teaching with cases. A project to build capacity and share expertise within and between disciplines for writing and teaching with cases has garnered interest and involvement from over 30 departments across campus. In this session, we will use an adapted “case method” to leverage the knowledge and experience of participants by examining the “case” of our attempt to build capacity for case-based learning. Background about the context at our institution and how we approached building capacity about CBL will be provided to participants to serve as a “case”. The traditional “case method” involves individual consideration of the case, then discussion of the case in small groups, followed by a facilitated discussion with the full group to explore issues and recommendations (Erskine et al., 2011). This will serve to demonstrate the “case method” to participants who are unfamiliar with it, encourage participants to share their own successes and challenges with CBL, and share what we have learned in our project.

Dunne, D. & Brooks, K. (2004). Teaching with cases. Halifax, NS: Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.

Erskine, J., Leenders, M., & Mauffette-Leenders, L. (2011). Teaching with Cases, 3rd Edition. London, ON: Ivey Publishing, Richard Ivey School of Business, Western University.

Williams B. (2005). Case based learning – a review of the literature: is there scope for this educational paradigm in prehospital education? Emergency Medical Journal, 22(8), 577-81.

Speakers
SA

scott anderson

Liaison, University of Waterloo
course design, curriculum design, curriculum mapping, case based learning, technology in teaching


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Salon 1

3:45pm

CON08.06 - Formation et pédagogie universitaire
Les compétences pédagogiques des formateurs universitaires jouent un rôle significatif dans la qualité de l’enseignement et de l’encadrement offerts aux étudiantes et aux étudiants. De nombreux chercheurs et intervenants des centres de développement pédagogique soulignent, par ailleurs, l’importance de mettre en place des formations pour les enseignants universitaires (Leduc, 2012; Luzeckyj et Badger, 2008). Dans cette optique, le centre de formation de soutien à l’académique offre depuis février 2014 des formations à la carte aux professeurs, maîtres de langue et personnes chargées de cours, leur permettant d’affiner leurs pratiques pédagogiques. En soutenant le développement professionnel des formateurs, le centre de formation contribue ainsi à instaurer une culture de formation continue ainsi qu’une dynamique de changement favorisant l’innovation pédagogique (Savoie-Zajc, 2010) dans l’institution, et ce, en favorisant les échanges et l’accompagnement. La communication vise, dans un premier temps, à faire le portrait des différentes formations offertes en pédagogie universitaire puis à analyser leur impact sur les pratiques pédagogiques, du point de vue des participants « formés ». Nous tenterons de démontrer que les formations répondent à des conditions qui permettent aux formateurs universitaires de reconnaître les besoins de leurs étudiants, d’acquérir et de parfaire des connaissances et des compétences en matière d’enseignement et d’apprentissage ainsi que d’être reconnus et valorisés pour leur travail (Frenay, Saroyan, Taylor, Bédard, Clement, Rege Colet, Paulet et Kolmos, 2010).

Frenay, M., Saroyan, A., Taylor, L., Bédard, D., Clement, M., Rege Colet, N., Paul, J-J. et Kolmos, A. (2010). Accompagner le développement pédagogique des professeurs universitaires à l'aide d'un cadre conceptuel original. Revue française de pédagogie, 3(172), 63-76.

Leduc, D. (2007). Conceptions, pratiques et besoins à l’enseignement universitaire : une comparaison entre professeurs novices et experts.Communication présentée au 24e congrès de l’AIPU (Association internationale de pédagogie universitaire). Montréal, Québec.

Luzeckyj, A. et Badger, L. (2008). Literature review for preparing academics to teach in higher education (PATHE). Australian Learning & Teaching Council (ALTC).

Savoie-Zajc, L. (2010). Les dynamiques d’accompagnement dans la mise en place de communautés d’apprentissage. Éducation et formation, e-293, 9-20.

Speakers
avatar for Helene Meunier

Helene Meunier

Conseillère pédagogique, UQAM
Chargée de cours au département d’éducation et pédagogie ainsi qu’au département de didactique à l’Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Hélène Meunier est aussi conseillère pédagogique à l’UQAM depuis février 2014 et termine un doctorat en évaluation des... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Thompson Room

3:45pm

CON08.13 - Tuning into students: Social impact of institutional rankings
Maclean's magazine, in November 2014, published its 23rd annual rankings of Canadian universities. Indeed, the ranking of universities has become a popular exercise with which to assess and promote higher education in North America. The ranking approach is similar to that used by publications such as Consumer Reports, in which goods or services are assigned scores, and then assigned relative rank standings. We present a data-based perspective on a multi-year analysis of Maclean's rankings of Canadian universities, including Spearman rank correlations, Wilcoxon rank sums, and a cluster analysis. More importantly, we discuss the relative social impact of these rankings on student welfare as they attend (and later exit from) university. Session attendees are invited to share the perspective from their own institution.

Cramer, K. M., & Page, S. (2007). Calibrating Canadian universities: Rankings for sale once again. Canadian Journal of School Psychology, 22, 4-13.

Page, S., Cramer, K. M., & Page, L. (2010). Canadian university rankings: Buyer beware once again. Interchange, 41, 81-89.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Cypress 2 Room

4:30pm

CON09.02 - Making sense of student rating of instruction data: Effective visualization techniques to inform teaching practice
Student Rating of Instruction (SRI) surveys produce useful information about some facets of teaching practice, but use of SRI data - and faith that they are useful - varies widely among institutions. Part of the reason often lies in the way the information is reported to its potential users. How might new approaches for presenting and investigating SRI data enable us to uncover and tell our teaching narratives more accurately and effectively, and point us in new directions for inquiry and growth? Participants in this session explore new and relatively simple techniques for visualizing aggregated and longitudinal SRI data to identify, reflect on, and document patterns found within the data. Reporting on a project focused on enhancing and promoting effective use of SRI data, we demonstrate some accessible, spreadsheet-based prototype tools that visualize SRI data in a variety of ways, provide context over time or within a program or teaching unit, and guide the reader's interpretation of the results. Using specific cases, participants and presenters together explore effective ways that such tools can be used by instructors, department heads, and academic developers to find meaningful patterns in SRI data, to annotate and document facets of an instructor's teaching in a portfolio, or to find insights that can lead to improved teaching practice for an individual instructor or within a program. We also provide some cautions about ways that SRI cannot or should not be used, and show how visualization tools can help avoid such misuse.

Graniero, P.A., Hamilton, B. and Cramer, K. (2014). SRI data aggregation and visualization: An evaluation of potential uses. Technical Report commissioned for Wright, A., Mighty, J., Muirhead, W., Scott, J., & Hamilton, B. (2014). The Ontario Universities' Teaching Evaluation Toolkit Feasibility Study: A Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities Productivity and Innovation Fund Initiative. University of Windsor: Windsor, ON.

Hativa, N. (2013a). Student ratings of instruction: Recognizing effective teaching. Charleston, SC: CreateSpace.

Hativa, N. (2013b). Student ratings of instruction: A practical approach to designing, operating, and reporting. Charleston, SC: CreateSpace.

Winer, L., di Genova, L., Vungoc, P.-A. & Talsma, S. (2012). Interpreting end-of-course evaluation results. Montreal: Teaching and Learning Services, McGill University.



Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Bayshore Salon D

4:30pm

CON09.04 - Student conceptions of “learning” as evidenced through short response items in learning journals
The purpose of this session is to fine tune our understandings around validity as it applies to formative assessment by exploring some of the educational implications derived from a study of student understanding or beliefs about what it means “to learn” (Chiou, Liang & Tsai, 2012). Participants will consider evidence presented in the form of Learning Journal short item responses from an undergraduate biology course in order to evaluate the relationship between what students claim to have learned and the evidence they provide to support those claims. Learning Journals are widely used as formative assessment to encourage students to reflect on their learning (Stephens & Winterbottom, 2010) and offer the potential to capture perspectives that are relatively immediate, since they are written close in time to the events being recorded (Wagner, 1999). In prior research on student conceptions of learning, participant responses from interviews or questionnaires are coded as being unproblematic representations of what students think. This may make sense for investigating learning in the traditional sense of transmission, but many university courses incorporate interactive and flexible learning strategies, requiring a negotiation of meaning between professors and their students. Therefore, we address issues of validity in formative assessment with a novel application of Discursive Psychology (Edwards, 1997) to written text, in order to explore the students’ contributions to the co-construction of what it means “to learn”. The presenters will invite discussion around how recognizing what students use as evidence for their own learning can help us better support learning.

Chiou, G.-L., Liang, J.-C. & Tsai, C.-C. (2012). Undergraduate students’ conceptions of and approaches to learning in biology: A study of their structural models and gender differences. International Journal of Science Education, 34, 167-195. doi:10.1080/09500693.2011.558131

Edwards, D. (1997). Discourse and cognition. London: Sage.

Stephens, K. & Winterbottom, M. (2010). Using a learning log to support students’ learning in biology lessons. Journal of Biological Education, 44, 72-80. doi:10.1080/00219266.2010.9656197

Wagner, Z. (1999). Using student journals for course evaluation. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 24(3), 261-272. doi:10.1080/0260293990240301


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Mackenzie Room

4:30pm

CON09.07 - Assessing the quality of online education
The rapid growth of online education (Allen & Seaman, 2013) brings questions about how best to maintain quality in teaching and ensure effective learning. One way to assess quality is through reliability and validity measures of student scores (Norman & Eva, 2010). We assessed the reliability and validity of a component of a new, online Masters of Sciences in Health Sciences Education Program for recent graduates and health professionals. The first required online course for students, entitled ‘Learning & Curriculum,’ exposes students to the basic principles of human memory and learning and challenges them to incorporate these principles into their own learning. Specifically, students are assessed in part on their participation in discussion posts to carefully designed ‘points to ponder’. An assessment of student scores showed an acceptable level of variance, with the greatest source from students (0.73). Inter-rater agreement was also high at 0.73 across all topics of discussion. Students also benefitted from the involvement and feedback of instructors as student scores showed an increasing trend over time. These scores also correlated positively with measures of performance from other components of the course (0.3). The purpose of our presentation will be to first share information about the planning of this nascent program and our application of successful teaching and learning strategies (Dunlosky et al, 2013) to an online format. Importantly, we will discuss our analyses and the interpretation of those results. We hope to engage participants in discussions of measuring impact in education and how best to interpret data. 

Allen, I. E., & Seaman, J. (2013). Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States. Sloan Consortium. PO Box 1238, Newburyport, MA 01950. 

Norman, G. R., & Eva, K. W. (2010). Diagnostic error and clinical reasoning. Medical education, 44(1), 94-100. 

Mayer, R. E. (2003). The promise of multimedia learning: using the same instructional design methods across different media. Learning and instruction, 13(2), 125-139.

Dunlosky, J., Rawson, K. A., Marsh, E. J., Nathan, M. J., & Willingham, D. T. (2013). Improving students’ learning with effective learning techniques promising directions from cognitive and educational psychology. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 14(1), 4-58.


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Chairman Room

4:30pm

CON09.10 - Flipped classroom: Results from a two-year implementation of four large undergraduate calculus courses
Our study reports the survey results of students’ flipped classroom experiences (n=411) across four first-year undergraduate calculus courses over a period of two-years. Our flipped classroom model combines the use of before-class instructor-made video lectures which are followed by online quizzes, in-class use of i>Clicker classroom response systems, peer-instruction, and just-in-time teaching. Analysis of student questionnaire data shows that students across all four offerings perceived the video lectures as valuable, and their overall flipped classroom experiences as positive. Factor analysis of the survey items revealed four consistent factors across course offerings (including different sections and instructors). They are 1) satisfaction with videos (perception of usefulness/value of the videos), 2) engagement with flipped classroom videos (watching videos and taking notes before coming to the flipped in-person classes), 3) reviewing behaviours (primarily of videos after class and during exam periods), and 4) engagement with peers. Analysis of these factors found several relationships. Among these were that engagement with flipped classroom videos positively correlates with grades, while reviewing behaviours of videos after flipped classes and before exams were negatively associated with grades. We will present these, as well as other study results. We will also share our instructional practice, and engage attendees in a discussion of how our experience and research findings informed our practice, and how attendees can apply these findings and active learning strategies in their own settings.


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Salon 2

4:30pm

CON09.11 - ePortfolio assignment design, integration, and student learning
This interactive session introduces a recent pilot project that explored benefits of, impediments to, and effective practices in implementing course-level ePortfolio assignments at Carleton University. Carleton’s teaching and learning centre is supporting individual instructors through individual consultations and a Faculty Learning Community which, like ePortfolios, is founded on a social pedagogy that posits that deep, integrative learning requires regular engagement and feedback. Faculty who volunteered to take part in the pilot project between August and December 2014, received support but ultimately made their own decisions about how to implement ePortfolios as assessment tools in their courses. We present some initial data collected from students, and in keeping with previous research in this area (Eynon, Gambino, and Torok, 2014; Rodgers, 2002; Wildman, Hable, Preston, and Magliaro, 2000; Wolfe and Miller, 1997), to help us identify how student learning was impacted by (1) ePortfolio assignment design and (2) degree of assignment integration throughout the course. Through a group discussion, and with the guidance of worksheets, presenters and session participants will develop a further list of effective practices to guide faculty and educational developers to implement ePortfolios that enhance students’ learning journeys. By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

1. identify benefits of, impediments to, and effective practices associated with implementing ePortfolios as assessment tools; 
2. recommend additional effective practices that draw directly on their own experiences with designing assessment tools;
3. reflect on how they might adapt these practices to their own institutional context.

References: 

Eynon, B., Gambino, L. M., & Török, J. 2014. “Reflection, Integration, and ePortfolio Pedagogy.” Accessed August 12, 2014, http://c2l.mcnrc.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/8/2014/01/Reflective_Pedagogy.pdf

Rodgers, Carol. 2002. “Defining Reflection: Another Look at Dewey and Reflective Thinking. Teachers College Review, 104 (4), 842-66.

Wildman, T., Hable, M., Preston, M., & Magliaro, S. 2000. Faculty student groups: Solving "good problems" through study, reflection, and collaboration. Innovative Higher Education, 24(4), 247-263.

Wolfe, E.W., & Miller, T.R. 1997. “Barriers to the implementation of portfolio assessment in secondary education.” Applied Measurement in Education, 10(3), 235-51.


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Salon 3

4:30pm

CON09.13 - Harness the power of test-enhanced learning using mTuner
mTuner is an online assessment application developed by our lab. It’s designed based on the research findings on test-enhanced learning (Roediger & Karpicke, 2006; Roediger & Marsh, 2005). mTuner test is a multiple-choice test with extra features. For each mTuner item, students are first primed with only the question and are given a chance to recall the answer. Once students enter their answer, they are showed the alternatives and are asked to make their response. If they choose the right alternative, the answer is highlighted and an explanation shows up elaborating why that answer is the correct one. However, if students choose the wrong alternative, they are directed either to a relevant passage from the eBook or to a brief video clip of a relevant lecture. In either case, the material they are exposed to provides them the information they need to figure out the right answer. After reviewing the material, students are given a second chance to choose again for partial credit. This time, regardless of whether students choose the correct alternative, they are showed the correct answer along with the explanation. This ensures students know the correct answer and why it is correct before they move on to the next item and, as such, they leave the assessment with a more accurate knowledge base than they had going in. In our presentation we will show a demo of mTuner and describe how it was implemented in an Introductory Psychology course, and we will also present empirical research data supporting the effectiveness of the application.


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Cypress 2 Room
 
Friday, June 19
 

8:30am

CON10.03 - Enhancing pedagogy with open textbooks and other open educational resources
Open Educational Resources (OER) are educational materials that are licensed to allow others to reuse, revise, remix, redistribute, and retain them free of cost. Open textbooks are one kind of OER, allowing such activities with a published textbook. Beyond the significant cost savings to students and the ability to share knowledge widely, there are also enormous pedagogical benefits associated with using and creating OER and open textbooks. Open textbooks can improve learning outcomes, in part because the high cost of traditional textbooks has been shown to keep some students from accessing the course material (Hilton & Laman, 2012; Senack, 2014). Their adaptability also means that students are reading material tailor-made for their particular course context. Students can be involved in revising and improving open textbooks and other OER, an excellent learning opportunity that also empowers them to contribute to the curriculum of their own course and to the learning of many more people beyond (Yeung, 2014; Chemwiki Hyperlibrary Development). Such authentic assignments can encourage students to do their best work while connecting them with people outside the course doing work in that field. In this session participants will be introduced to several ways in which faculty are using and creating OER and open textbooks, and will brainstorm pedagogical benefits of doing so as well as potential drawbacks and how to address them. Participants can expect to gain ideas for how they might use and/or create OER in their own courses, for the benefit of their students as well as others.

Hilton III, J. & Laman, C. (2012). One college’s use of an open psychology textbook. Open Learning: The Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning 27 (3), 265-272. doi: 10.1080/02680513.2012.716657.

Senack, E. (2014). Fixing the broken textbook market: How students respond to high textbook costs and demand Alternatives. U.S. PIRG Reports. Retrieved from http://uspirg.org/reports/usp/fixing-broken-textbook-market 

Yeung, L. (2014, August 21). Wikipedia’s medical errors and one’ doctor’s fight to correct them. CBC News British Columbia. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/wikipedia-s-medical-errors-and-one-doctor-s-fight-to-correct-them-1.2743268

Chemwiki Hyperlibrary Development. (n.d.). U.C. Davis Chemwiki. Retrieved from http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Development_Details/Hyperlibrary_Development

Speakers
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching in Philosophy, Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology, The University of British Columbia
Philosophy, OER, open textbooks, open pedagogy


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am
Bayshore Salon EF

8:30am

CON10.07 - Moving to the music: Promoting explicit memory in human neuroanatomy and physiology with song, dance and play
The study of human anatomy involves naming thousands of structures, and structural features while conceptually developing a three-dimensional arrangement to understand the physical relationships among them. Physiology is the integration of this structural knowledge with how components of the body function in isolation, in systems, and in unison. As such, the recollection and recital of structural names is only the beginning of orchestrating a rich understanding of how these structures harmoniously work together. The difficulty students have with explicit memory in these subjects is often related to the sheer volume of structures to remember combined with the complexity of learning anatomical language. To aid students in learning these complex structures, kinesthetic techniques, such as dance and play to music, help them to effectively acquire the fundamental knowledge of the structures and utilize it for higher order processing (Mobley & Fisher, 2014). This strategy has been effective for learning the cranial nerves (vital for our ability to see, smell, taste, smile, hear, etc.) and the brachial plexus (vital to our ability to use our upper limbs) – structures that students find particularly troublesome (Meyer & Land, 2005). In this 45 minute interactive session, participants will be encouraged to learn about anatomy through the movement and engagement exercises students used to acquire fundamental knowledge of the cranial nerves. Participants will also have the opportunity to make their own model of the brachial plexus and consider the use of these types of strategies in their own practice. 

References:

Meyer, J. H. F., & Land, R. (2005). Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge (2): Epistemological considerations and a conceptual framework for teaching and learning. Higher Education, 49 (3), 373 – 388. doi:10.1007/s10734-004-6779-5. 

Mobley, K., & Fisher, S. (2014). Ditching the Desks: Kinesthetic Learning in College Classrooms. The Social Studies, 105, 301 – 309. doi:10.1080/00377996.2014.951471.

Speakers
avatar for Richelle Monaghan (Wilfrid Laurier University)

Richelle Monaghan (Wilfrid Laurier University)

Assistant Professor, Head of Science Programming in Public Health, Wilfrid Laurier University


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am
Chairman Room

9:30am

CON11.02 - A stich in time! Quality assurance in course design & teaching in a research-intensive university
In the global higher education scenario new investments are being made towards the continued growth of online learning. Universities are required to prove that they are effective leaders and demonstrate their ability to compete in socio-economic terms to their corporate/community partners. As a result, quality assurance has become an imperative in academia. Empirical evidence on the effectiveness of quality assurance practices in academic settings is still emerging. Anecdotal evidence is a mixed bag that often points to a divide between formal rules and what gets done in the workplace. We argue that the relationship between quality assurance and enacted quality practice needs to be understood in the light of how formal organizational structures, as well as cultural characteristics and academic aims are balanced within working groups in universities. The session objective is to: 

- Demonstrate the value of Planning, Development, Production, Implementation and Evaluation (PDPIE) quality framework in course design and teaching in a variety of contexts – on-campus, blended, distance education offerings 
- Explore the relationship between quality assurance and educational improvement

We will use a set of activities to engage the participants to ask and answer questions around their institutional and departmental priorities, individual goal(s) in the path of redesigning courses, teaching, technology –integration, optimizing student engagement. This session welcomes a wide range of participants in teaching and educational development practice. The activities are designed to promote critical thinking on the key questions of what, how and why of quality assurance. 

References

Heap, J. (2013). Ontario's Quality Assurance Framework: A Critical Response. A Quarterly Review of Education, 44(3-4), pp. 203-218.

Houston, D. & Paewai, S. (2013). Knowledge, Power and Meanings Shaping Quality Assurance in Higher Education: A Systemic Critique, Quality in Higher Education, 19(3), pp. 261-282.

Mårtensson, K., Roxå, T. & Stensaker, B. (2014). Quality Assurance to Quality Practices: An Investigation of Strong Microcultures in Teaching and Learning, Studies in Higher Education, 39(4), pp. 534-545.


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am
Bayshore Salon D

9:30am

CON11.06 - Indeterminate roots and diminished sevenths: Exploring the functions of evaluation and assessment in teaching and learning using chord theory
An understanding of music theory is a fantastic advantage, as it allows us to appreciate the complexity of a given piece and to communicate musical ideas. Music theory also helps us understand how music works, along with the functions of the various components in a piece. In this interactive musical session, I playfully use music theory as a metaphor to explore the value and potential of evaluation and assessment as resources in a pedagogue’s toolkit, outlining the functions that these play in my own practice of teaching anthropology at the undergraduate level. While evaluation is summative and tends to focus on grades, the heart of assessment is much broader. It assists in student learning, helps pinpoint learners’ strengths and weaknesses, serves to improve teaching and program effectiveness, and plays a number of other roles in the learning and teaching process. Despite a sustained emphasis on the advantages of assessment in learning and teaching research, however, assessment’s underutilization and evaluation’s disproportionate prioritization are persistent leitmotifs in many undergraduate teaching and learning contexts. Using chord theory to delve into the root causes of the continued dissonance between research and practice in teaching and learning, I will delineate strategic structural reasons and outline some of the groundwork that is to be done at various levels in order for concordance to be achieved at our institutions. A small group sharing session will follow, where participants will be invited to assess the challenges identified, recognize further issues, and design concrete multi-level strategies for overcoming these.

SOME OF THE REFERENCES USED IN THE PRESENTATION:

ASTIN, A. W. (2012). Assessment for excellence: The philosophy and practice of assessment and evaluation in higher education. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

BROWN, S., & GLASNER, A. (1999). Assessment matters in higher education. Buckingham: Open University Press.

EARL, L. M. (2012). Assessment as learning: Using classroom assessment to maximize student learning. London: Corwin Press.

ROWLAND, S. (2000). The enquiring university teacher. Buckingham: Open University Press.


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am
Thompson Room

9:30am

CON11.09 - Deeper learning, increased student satisfaction and metacognitive gains through collaborative testing with immediate feedback
Assessment in post secondary education tends to be on an individual basis, despite the fact that having to express and explain reasoning, and reach consensus with colleagues are valuable skills in the workplace. Harmonizing these discrepancies can be achieved by introducing collaboration into evaluation, a technique that can be used even in large classes where multiple-choice tests tend to be the norm. 2-stage midterm exams, described by Gilley & Clarkston (2014), were used in very different programs, with overwhelmingly positive student review. We will provide preliminary experimental data, reporting on a new addition to collaborative testing: providing immediate feedback to students during collaboration. Using the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique (IF-AT) (Epstein, 2001), answers to questions are revealed using scratch cards. Groups of students have multiple chances to discuss, should their first answer be incorrect, with partial credit awarded for subsequent attempts. Self-assessment and self-learning are promoted with immediate feedback, important facets of metacognitive skill development that can lead to improved individual academic performance (Carvalho, 2010). In addition to boosting confidence, we hypothesize that providing feedback at a moment when students are most receptive for the guided answer also promotes retention, and substantially overcomes the drawbacks from mark inflation due to collaborative testing without feedback (Molsbee, 2013). Our hands-on session will include a simulation of the procedure by engaging participants in a collaborative setting with feedback, along with providing tips for implementation in your classroom. We will discuss the pros and cons of various protocol decisions to fine-tune this new practice.

References

Carvalho, M. K. F. (2010). Assessing changes in performance and monitoring processes in individual and collaborative tests according to students' metacognitive skills. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 22(7), 1107-1136.

Epstein, M.L., Epstein B.B., and Brosvic, G.M. (2001). Immediate Feedback During Academic Testing. Psychological Reports, 88(3 Pt 1), 889-894.

Gilley, B. H. & Clarkston, B. (2014). Collaborative Testing: Evidence of Learning in a Controlled In-Class study of Undergraduate Students. Journal of College Science Teaching, 43(3), 83-91.

Molsbee, C.P. (2013). Collaborative Testing and Mixed Results. Teaching and Learning in Nursing, 8, 22-25.


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am
Salon 1

9:30am

CON11.12 - Collegial supervision - turned upside down - using inter-vision to challenge the academy rethink their teaching and develop great communities of practice
Collegial supervision is a method based on observation & reflective dialogue among peers with the purpose of developing their and improving their teaching through interaction and collective introspection. This method develops both the individual teacher’s practice as well as the community of practice (Wenger, 2000). The method is inspired by Donald A. Schön and his concepts: Reflection-in-action and Reflection-on-action (Schön, 1995), Reflective Practice The method is known as collegial Inter-vision in Denmark and is used at several HEIs in Denmark. At Roskilde University we use collegial supervision (inter-vision) as a tool for teaching quality enhancement. We organize the supervision in groups of 3 peers who observe each other teach and conduct a specific type of reflective dialogue on the basis of the observations. The supervision dialogue is anchored in the specific observations with its departure in the observed teacher’s pre-chosen focal points. In the dialogue the teachers activate and challenge their knowledge base and meta-reflect on own teaching practices (Handal).

See a video clip of teachers in a collegial supervision situation
The objective of the workshop is: 

* To present collegial supervision and the experiences from Roskilde University using this method in HE teacher development

* Break down steps for participants to try in a small simulation and then reflect/discuss usefulness compared to current practices

* Discuss the benefits and challenges of collegial supervision as a tool for raising the quality of teaching in Higher Education.

References: 

Schön, D, (1995): Reflective Practice: its implications for classroom, administration and research, A public lecture given for the Dept. of Language, Literacy & Arts Education, The University of Melbourne. 

Handal, Gunnar & Peter Lauvås (2006) Vejledning og praksisteori, Klim.

Wenger, E. (2000) Communities of Practice and Social Learning Systems Organization May 2000 vol. 7 (2), pp 225-24

Wenger, E. (1998) Communities of practice: learning, meaning, and identity (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press)


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am
Cypress 1 Room

10:45am

CON12.05 - Le portfolio: un outil d'évaluation pour la formation des maîtres
Depuis plusieurs années, la majorité des universités qui offrent des programmes de formation à l’enseignement demandent aux étudiants de se constituer, tout au long de leur formation, un portfolio professionnel. Celui-ci se définit comme un outil où la réflexion, l’autoévaluation et la créativité permettent de faire des liens entre les objectifs d’apprentissage et les apprentissages réalisés. Le portfolio professionnel devient par le fait même de nature évaluative, permettant la prise en compte du produit et du processus de développement professionnel. Le projet de recherche doctorale étudiera la pertinence d’utiliser cet outil pour l’évaluation des apprentissages en formation des maîtres à partir des représentations aussi bien des formateurs universitaires qui évaluent les portfolios que des étudiants qui sont évalués à l’aide de ceux-ci, et ce, à l’aide de questionnaires, d’entrevues et d’analyses de documents. La communication vise donc à préciser les objectifs de cette recherche qualitative ainsi qu’à en présenter le cadre conceptuel. Finalement, des prospectives méthodologiques seront proposées, compte tenu de l’avancement des travaux.

Bélair, L., Laveault, D. et Lebel, C. (2007). Les compétences professionnelles en enseignement et leur évaluation. Ottawa, Ontario : Les Presses de l’Université d’Ottawa.

Gérard, F.-M. (2008). Évaluer des compétences : guide pratique. Bruxelles, Belgique : De Boeck.

Jorro, A. et Maurice, J. J. (2008). De l’analyse à l’évaluation d’une pratique professionnelle. In G. Baillat, J-M. De Ketele, L. Paquay et C. Thélot (ed.), Evaluer pour former (p. 29-42). Bruxelles, Belgique : De Boeck.

Portelance, L. (2008). L’évaluation intégrée à la formation par compétences. In L. Lafortune, D. Martin, S. Ouellet, C. Lebel, N. Perrin et S. Wokusch (ed.). L’évaluation des compétences professionnelles en formation à l’enseignement (p. 13-34). Québec, Québec : Presses de l’Université du Québec.

Speakers
avatar for Helene Meunier

Helene Meunier

Conseillère pédagogique, UQAM
Chargée de cours au département d’éducation et pédagogie ainsi qu’au département de didactique à l’Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Hélène Meunier est aussi conseillère pédagogique à l’UQAM depuis février 2014 et termine un doctorat en évaluation des... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am
Thompson Room

10:45am

CON12.11 - Online evaluation of courses: Examining impact on participation rates and evaluation scores
At one of Ontario’s largest Universities, course evaluations involve some 6,000 course sections and over 43,000 students every year. This paper-based format requires over 650,000 sheets of paper, 20,000 envelopes, and the support of dozens of administrative staff members. Stemming from an interest in efficiency, environmental sustainability and reduced cost, this university is seeking to join numerous other Canadian institutions in adopting an online system for the evaluation of courses. Among the greatest concerns identified in the literature on the online evaluation of courses is the decrease in student participation (Adams & Umbach, 2012). Most studies on the subject point to a lower participation rate for online evaluation as compared with paper-based evaluations (Gamliel & Davidovitz, 2005; Nevo, McClean & Nevo, 2010). Lower participation rates in course evaluations raises questions which include: How representative are the students who complete the questionnaire compared with the overall student body taking the course? Might lower achieving students and those least satisfied with the course be overrepresented when using an online evaluation format? This presentation seeks to address these issues by presenting the results of a recent institutional report on the impact of the online evaluation of courses on student participation rates and on the evaluation scores as compared with the paper-based method. The session is largely structured as a presentation of salient report results with participant discussion throughout. All documents and materials will be provided in both English and French.

References:

Adams, M. J. D. & Umbach, P.D. (2012). Nonresponse and Online Student Evaluations of Teaching: Understanding the Influence of Salience, Fatigue, and Academic Environments, Research in Higher Education, 53(5), 576-591.

Gamliel, E. & Davidovitz, L. (2005). Online versus traditional teaching evaluation: mode can matter, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 30(6), 581-592.

Nevo, D., McClean, R. & Nevo, S. (2010). Harnessing Information Technology to Improve the Process of Students’ Evaluations of Teaching: An Exploration of Students’ Critical Success Factors of Online Evaluations, Journal of Information Systems Education, 21(1), 99-109.



Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am
Cypress 1 Room