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Achieving Harmony: Tuning into Practice

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Learning Environments and Technology Integration [clear filter]
Tuesday, June 16
 

9:00am

Team work that works: Introduction to team-based learning
Prepared, engaged students…
A college classroom humming with active learning…
Time for rich, structured problem-solving…
What professor wouldn’t jump at the chance to create a learning environment like that?
Come find out what Team-Based Learning (TBL) is all about! In this very hands on workshop, you will learn about the important processes and procedures to successfully implement TBL. Learn how to get your students to come to class prepared and then how to use that preparation to “flip” your classroom so that class time can be better spent helping students learn how to apply course concepts to solve problems. During the workshop you will get to experience all the main instructional components of TBL from the student perspective.


Tuesday June 16, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
Salon 3
 
Wednesday, June 17
 

11:15am

CON01.05 - Are there perks to being a Twitter wallflower? Exploring peripheral Twitter participation in public relations education
Increasingly, instructors at all academic levels and across a variety of disciplines are introducing social networking tools in their classes – likely in response to the participatory culture that has evolved from the Web 2.0 technology that has nurtured a generation of “digital natives” (Prensky, 2001). As a social media instructor, I witnessed young people engaged in social networking as a “living technology” (Kennedy, Judd, Churchward, Gary & Krause, 2008, p.119), facilitating their social lives, but were reticent when asked to migrate to the social networks that have become the “learning technology” (Kennedy, et. al., 2008) of the classroom. Kennedy, et. al. (2008) has described the migration from living to learning technologies as neither automatic, nor guaranteed (p. 119), resulting in non- and peripheral participation among students, despite the digital native rhetoric, and the situated learning opportunities afforded by the publicness of the tool. At Humber College, public relations (PR) students are encouraged to use a Twitter hashtag, #humberpr, which has evolved into an online community of practice, where students, faculty and industry experts intersect. My research explores the experience of the PR student who remains on the periphery of #humberpr, including: negotiation of power dynamics; barriers to the migration from a living to a learning technology; and the learning of the peripheral player. Although focused on PR students, my findings should prove relevant to educators across all disciplines. 

Kennedy, G.E., Judd, T.S., Churchward, A., Gray, K., & Krause, K-L. (2008). First year students’ experiences with technology: Are they really digital natives? Australasian Journal of Educational Technology. 24 (1), p 108-122. Retrieved from: http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet24/kennedy.html

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants, Part 1. On the Horizon. Sept-Oct. 2001. 9 (5), (pp. 1-6). Retrieved from http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/prenskyper cent20-per cent20digitalper cent20natives,per cent20digitalper cent20immigrantsper cent20-per cent20part1.pdf


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am
Director Room

12:00pm

CON02.02 - An analysis of the quality of student-led asynchronous discussions in on-line and blended learning courses
In this study we examine the pedagogical value of student-led asynchronous on-line discussions used in a first-year undergraduate Criminology class at Simon Fraser University. The course is offered in both distance education and blended-learning (includes weekly two-hour lectures) formats. Once during the term, each student produces an on-line presentation (PowerPoint format - no voice over or camera required) and two discussion questions and is also responsible for facilitating student discussion. Each student is also an assigned discussant for four different presentations during the course. In 2013, students were invited to complete an on-line survey regarding student perceptions of the delivery of this course. Our project emerged during our analysis of the 2013 survey which showed that not all students were fans of the online presentations and discussions. As instructors and teaching assistants we wanted to evaluate our perceptions because we felt that for the most part, the on-line discussions were of considerably higher quality than what we had experienced leading traditional first-year tutorials in-person discussions. The on-line discussion posts were often well-edited, thoughtful, engaging, and evidenced critical thinking. Despite the fact that students didn’t necessarily agree (Paechter & Maier 2010), our research findings support the value of well-designed and moderated asynchronous discussions in an on-line educational setting (Andresen, 2009). Finally, we address study-specific implications and advantages for EAL (English Additional Language) students and the use of on-line tutorial technology (Zeng & Takatsuka, 2009; Dang & Robertson, 2010). Opportunities for audience feedback and questions will be encouraged throughout. 

References:

Andresen, M. A. (2009). Asynchronous discussion forums: Success factors, outcomes, assessments, and limitations. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 12(1), 249-257.

Dang, T. T., & Robertson, M. (2010). Pedagogical lessons from students' participation in Web 2.0. [Article]. TESOL in Context, 20(2), 5-26. 

Paechter, M., & Maier, B. (2010). Online or face-to-face? Students' experiences and preferences in e-learning. The Internet and Higher Education, 13(4), 292-297. doi:10.1016/j.iheduc.2010.09.004

Zeng, G., & Takatsuka, S. (2009). Text-based peer–peer collaborative dialogue in a computer-mediated learning environment in the EFL context. System, 37(3), 434-446.

Speakers
SF

Sheri Fabian

Dr. Sheri Fabian is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Criminology at Simon Fraser University. Her teaching and research focus on minorities and justice, qualitative research methods, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. She is a mentor for the graduate student Certificate... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Bayshore Salon EF

12:00pm

CON02.07 - Building a harmonious and effective community of learners: The challenges of fostering peer interaction in online courses
Creating situations to promote effective interaction between students in online courses presents a greater challenge than in the face-to-face environment of traditional classrooms. Yet, because interaction is a key component of learning, we need to find effective ways to implement it in the online environment. As others have pointed out, “the main vehicle of communication in an online learning community is online discussion.” However, to be successful, those involved in online discussion need the opportunity to communicate with one another. That is, they need to work together as a community. According to M. Moallem, ”a community of learners cannot exist if its members do not care for and understand each other’s feelings.” Given that students practically never see each other’s facial expressions in the online environment, this presents a particular challenge. Promoting a successful community of learners in computer-facilitated courses therefore requires careful consideration. Responding to these challenges, this presentation will focus on ways to promote communication. We will discuss 2 strategies that were implemented in an on-line course on Paris: 1. The creation of a discussion forum where students uploaded their assignments and subsequently commented on the work of their peers; 2. The creation of working groups through which the foundational principles of collaboration were established. Students were then provided with opportunities to contribute to the creation of a community of learners. After presenting their findings, the presenters will initiate an interactive discussion, inviting those interested to share their views on the challenges of online interaction.

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (1999). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The internet and higher education, 2(2), 87-105.

Moallem, M. (2003). An interactive online course: A collaborative design model. Educational Technology Research and Development, 51(4), 85-103.

Yuan, J., & Kim, C. (2014). Guidelines for facilitating the development of learning communities in online courses. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 30(3), 220-232.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Director Room

12:00pm

CON02.10 - From mobile access to multi-device learning ecologies: A case study
As mobile access is turning into primary access, many universities and organizations find themselves constantly challenged to keep up with student expectations. At the same time, we have moved further into an age of networked information and students have easier access to better quality educational resources outside of university than ever before. Faced with these opportunities, university instructor and software interaction designer Paul Hibbitts has pushed the boundaries of his multi-device course companions in order to improve learner experience and better support an open and ever-evolving learning ecology. In this presentation, Paul will present a multi-device course companion case study then share for discussion two recently published learning and education models: 1) a learning + technology development model which attempts to further unify learner needs, experience, and technology and 2) a multi-device learning ecology diagnostic tool and framework.

Allen, Michael. (2012) Leaving ADDIE for SAM: An Agile Model for Developing the Best Learning Experiences. Alexandria, VA: ASTD Press.

Quinn, C. (2012) The Mobile Academy: mLearning for Higher Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/John Wiley

Vai, M. and Sosulski, K. (2011). The Essential Guide to Online Course Design: A Standards-Based Guide (Essentials of Online Learning). NY, New York: Routledge.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Hibbitts

Paul Hibbitts

Educator, Interaction Designer and Open Source Developer, Hibbitts Design / Simon Fraser University
For over 20 years Paul has delivered design solutions, customized training and practical strategies for organizations such as SAP BusinessObjects, The Canadian Real Estate Association and The University of British Columbia. Combining his professional user experience design skill set... Read More →



Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Salon 3

1:45pm

CON03.07 - Leading change with learning spaces
Students need to be actively engaged in the classroom in order to create opportunities for meaningful, deep learning. Students are also “likely to adopt the mode of learning signaled by the existing layout and type of furniture” (JISC, 2006, p.25). Only recently has there has been an increasing focus in higher education on the transformation of the physical learning environment on campus based on what we know about how students learn (Jamieson, 2000). How does a university develop this shift towards thinking about learning spaces? Ten years ago, the Provost gave our teaching and learning centre the opportunity to lead the process of redesigning learning spaces. This decision, while historically not seen as a role for a teaching and learning centre, was seen as an opportunity to enact change across the institution. This interactive session will focus on exploring and discussing a ten-year process on how our university has changed to make learning spaces a strategic priority. Participants will reflect on and discuss the key elements of success and how it could apply to their own university teaching and learning initiatives. 

Jamieson, P., Fisher, K., Gilding, T., Taylor, P. G., & Trevitt, A.C.F. (2000). Place and space in the design of new learning environments. Higher Education Research and Development, 19(2), 221-237.

Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC). (2006). Designing spaces for effective learning: A guide to 21st Century learning space design. Retrieved from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/uploaded_documents/JISClearningspaces.pdf


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Chairman Room

3:00pm

CON04.04 - Blending billionaires, beavers and banditos
In September 2014, the North American Studies program in the Faculty of Arts at Wilfrid Laurier launched a new, introductory course: Billionaires, Beavers, and Banditos. The aim was clear: provide first year students with innovative learning environments to facilitate the transition to university. We also wanted students to critically disrupt concepts including identity, citizenship, race, business, and the nation state. The course incorporated blended, active, interdisciplinary, and low risk/high reward learning. Students were required to assume greater ownership, becoming more ‘free range’ in the management of their course time and work. Still, a curricular framework was intentionally designed to foster university level skills development and learning habits, suited to competencies needed as dynamic life-long learners and ‘free range’, independent thinkers. This interactive session begins with a presentation of the course as a case study, demonstrating how a teaching environment that integrates technology facilitates blended learning to effectively transform a large lecture class to maximize engagement between instructors and students (Garrison and Kanuka, 2004). Preliminary evidence from the first offerings of the course will be reviewed. Colleagues in the sciences seem to have embraced blended learning more readily (Talbert, 2014), but similar approaches can be used in arts courses to achieve smaller class sizes and more active and engaged participation by a larger number of students. Modeling some of the active learning strategies used in the course, participants in this interactive session will work together to brainstorm and adapt a toolkit of proven teaching and learning strategies applicable to other large, introductory, university courses in the arts. 

Garrison, D. R., & Kanuka, H. (2004). Blended learning: Uncovering its transformative potential in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 7(2), 95–105.

Talbert, R. (2014, December). Exploring the Flipped Learning Model. Educational Development. Lecture conducted from Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Mackenzie Room

3:00pm

CON04.07 - Hold the phone: Tuning into mobile technology in higher education
This interactive session invites participants to discuss and explore the practical implications of working with mobile technology in our classrooms. Smartphone and tablet computer ownership continues to grow in Canada (comScore, 2014). Mobile devices are a capable and pervasive personal technology, with many people accessing content on multiple screens and devices throughout the day. The market penetration and the technical maturity of these devices do not of course translate smoothly into universal acceptance in our educational institutions. Some argue that these devices drive new forms of digital divide, for example between students able to ‘amplify’ their learning experiences and those who are distracted (Halverson & Halverson, 2012). A further divide exists between institutions and teachers who engage with these technologies, and those that seek to restrict or block their presence. It is challenging for educators and students to navigate the inevitable slippages in the educational application of consumer technologies: informal versus formal use, private communication versus public collaboration, consumption versus production of content, and so on. This is an especially pressing issue as institutions start moving towards a Bring Your Own Device model of IT services, one that recognises how these devices can cut across many dimensions of academics’ and students’ lives in ways that sometimes render traditional campus boundaries or classroom walls irrelevant. Bring your smartphones and tablets to explore playful conventions to design engaging learning activities that utilize mobile devices. Participants will share approaches and discuss obstacles to the acceptance and adoption of these technologies within formal learning spaces.

Cameron, D. (2009). Mashup: Digital media and drama conventions. In M. Anderson, J. Carroll, & D. Cameron (Eds.), Drama Education with Digital Technology (pp. 52 - 66). London: Continuum.

comScore (2014). 2014 Canada digital future in focus. http://www.comscore.com/Insights/Presentations-and-Whitepapers/2014/2014-Canada-Digital-Future-in-Focus.

Halverson, E. R., & Halverson, R. (2012). The design and assessment of 21st century learning environments. Recorded presentation, Centre for Research on Computer Supported Learning and Cognition, The University of Sydney. http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/p7ek82a56rw/

Johnson, L., Adams, S., & Cummins, M. (2012). NMC Horizon Report: 2012 K-12 Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Chairman Room

3:00pm

CON04.12 - Fostering lifelong learners in business education through the program-level integration of creative learning portfolios
Sheridan College’s Pilon School of Business Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) programs vision is to develop students “as lifelong learners to ensure that their transition to … work environments is smooth and seamless” (Bedrow & Evers, 2011, p. 407). This mandate calls on a mindset of transformational learning (Jarvis, 2006) embracing reflection (Brookfield, 2012), and culminating in the mastery of key employability competencies (Wagner, 2008). The Creative Learning Portfolio (CLP) (reflection and Desire2Learn ePortfolio tool) has been strategically integrated into the degrees. This approach is a unique Business school program-level implementation and a graduation requirement. Our CLP model encompasses an Introductory CLPs course (first year), Advanced CLPs course (final year), and curriculum and work place learning integration throughout the program. We adopted Zubizaretta’s (2009) learning portfolio model (experiences/reflection, evidence/documentation, and mentoring/collaboration).  In this interactive workshop, we will showcase the BBA programs’ CLP design and delivery model, experiences and lessons learned from the Introduction to CLPs course and curriculum integration activities (to 200+ students in Fall 2014/Winter 2015), student samples, and engage in interactive/reflective dialogue. As a result of this workshop, participants will be able to:

• Explore strategies for integrating and scaffolding portfolio learning and ePortfolios into program(s) and/or course(s).
• Inquire and reflect upon learning experiences including successes and setbacks to enable the fine-tuning of personal practice. 
• Nurture the reflective process and help learners purposefully develop metacognition skills for lifelong learning.
• Access reference list of relevant research papers._

References:

Berdrow, I. and Evers, F.T. (2010). Bases of Competence: A Framework for Facilitating Reflective Learner-Centered Educational Environments, Journal of Management Education. 35(3): 406-427.

Brookfield, S. D. (2012). Teaching for Critical thinking: Tools and Techniques to Help Students Question Their Assumptions. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Jarvis, P. (2006). Towards a comprehensive theory of human learning: Lifelong learning and the learning society, Vol 1. New York, NY: Routledge.

Wagner, T. (2008). The Global Achievement Gap: Why even our best schools don’t teach the new survival skills our children need and what can we do about it. NY: Basic Books.

Zubizaretta, J. (2009). The Learning Portfolio: Reflective Practice for Improving Student Learning, 2nd Edition; San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Cypress 1 Room

4:00pm

POSTER.15 - Teaching students argumentation visually with the dialectical map
There is a growing interest in argumentation, its pedagogical significance, and the teaching of argumentation skills. Research has found correlations between students’ argumentation skills and their critical thinking process, which is central to higher education. However, evidence shows that students often lack good argumentation skills. This presentation introduces a newly developed argumentation visualization tool, the Dialectical Map (DM), which facilitates the teaching of argumentation skills. The DM is a hybrid of argument maps and argument vee diagrams . Students create DMs by identifying and composing claims, evidence, and warrants in a computer-supported environment. They then draw an integrated conclusion by evaluating arguments and counterarguments in a visually hierarchical structure. In a lab experiment and two implementations in university-level biology classes, preliminary findings show improvements in students’ argumentation skills over time. Students’ improved argumentation skills showed transfer, with matching improvements in writing styles, organization of information, and reasoning skills. Students responded very positively to the DM. One student said, “It challenged us to learn how to argue effectively.” Another said, “The DM challenged my ability to argue a topic. I thought I had skills [in argumentation] before, but I don't think I was actually very skilled.” The presentation includes the concept of argumentation and its role in teaching and learning. Diagrams are given on how to construct a DM. We then present findings from our case studies using the DM and conclude the presentation with a brief discussion.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.16 - Tuning into student perceptions of eportfolio use for reflective learning and leadership development
Creating 21st century leaders is the focus of a MBA program in Southwestern Ontario. To build leadership capacity among MBA students through reflective learning, ePortfolios were used as an intervention in a thirteen-week course. ePortfolios have been used for reflective learning in higher education and teacher education (Jafari & Kaufman, 2006), but few studies have explored its use among business students (Eynon, Gambio, & Török, 2014). This mixed-methods study investigated student perceptions of ePortfolio use to support transformative learning and leadership development in a MBA program. Analyses of pre-and post-intervention surveys reveal that students’ initial positive attitudes towards ePortfolios were sustained throughout the course as a tool for reflection and communication. Interviews with students, faculty, administrators and staff and content analyses suggest students engaged in transformative learning and leadership development by demonstrating awareness of their leadership strengths, how their awareness changed the way they lead, what type of leader they wanted to become, and the type of leader they were becoming. However, sustaining continued ePortfolio use throughout the program was a challenge. Strategic implementation of ePortfolios from the beginning of the MBA program and support throughout the program modules is needed to help students sustain ePortfolio use and benefit from continued self-reflection for leadership development. The poster presentation will engage participants by sharing ePortfolio exemplars, excerpts from interviews, and a reflective activity to generate shared understanding of how students perceive integration of ePortfolios into a MBA program. 

Eynon, B., Gambino, L. M., & Török, J. (2014). What difference can an ePortfolio make? A Field Report from the Connect to Learning Project. LaGuardia Community College (CUNY). 

Jafari, A., & Kaufman, C. (2006). Handbook of research on ePortfolios. Hershey, PA: Idea Group Reference.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.17 - Tuning into technology: An autobiographical study of the development of teachers' educational technology competencies
This presentation reports the results of a retrospective study of the life-long, technology learning experiences of a sample of technology-literate teachers to determine if there are transformative patterns of experience explaining the development of their information technology (IT) competencies. The teachers completed IT autobiographies that included a timeline of the major IT milestones for the past 40 years and spaces to write biographical explanations of their personal experiences with the particular milestones that were relevant to them. To assist recall, each milestone was graphically illustrated and verbally captioned to explain its historical significance. Mixed-methods analyses of the autobiographies indicated that emergent technologies frequently set trends that supported the learning of both those technologies and IT in general. One example is that a quantitative comparison of the teachers’ education experiences indicated that informal education was significantly more important than formal education for the development of their IT competencies. Another example is that a qualitative analysis of the IT autobiographies indicated there were several common patterns of experience that have facilitated the development of teachers’ IT competencies. Some of these included parents’ purchases of home computers, access to computer games, the presence of IT mentors, and the availability of IT equipment at their schools. 

References:

Anderson, S., Groulx, J., & Maninger, R. (2012). Relationships among pre-service teachers’ technology-related abilities, beliefs, and intentions to use technology in their future classrooms. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 45(3), 321-338.

Aubrey, C., & Dahl, S. (2014). The confidence and competence in information and communication technologies of practitioners, parents and young children in the early years foundation stage. Early Years: An International Journal of Research and Development, 34(1), 94-108.

Prestige, S. (2012). The beliefs behind teachers that influences their ICT practices. Computers and Education, 58, 449-458.

Thompson, P. (2013). The digital natives as learners: Technology use patterns and approaches to learning. Computers & Education, 65, 12-33.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.18 - Women and gamification: Disassembling the gendered classroom
This poster examines the literature in both traditional gaming and educational technology spheres, and uses feminist theory and user demographics to deconstruct enthusiasm for existing instructional gamification methods. Current literature shows that gamified learning environments, including systems using engagement tools such as badges, leaderboards, and so forth, can discourage female and female-identified students from participation or competition due to lack of familiarity, lack of representation, and perceived gender bias. Additionally, literature examining higher education instructional settings reveals that gamified online learning environments can disproportionately encourage male success and perpetuate stereotypes about female educational successes in spite of measured aptitude. Use of gamification elements like scoreboards, use of “violent language”, and mandatory self-identification can discourage and lead to the disengagement of female learners. Additionally, as males represent a disproportionate number of video gamers in their personal time, they are at a distinct advantage regarding video game mechanics, controls, and familiarity with competition structure. Conversely, some gamification methods, particularly those which encourage or facilitate community building, like discussion forums or other collaborative formats, can encourage female participation in online learning environments, and should be explored further to maximize student successes. Because gamification has been identified as a valuable tool to encourage engagement in learners across a broad population group, further research is needed to determine best next-steps for better encouraging female learner success without compromising long-established male learner successes in this type of learning environment.

Ahuja, M. K., & Thatcher, J. B. (2005). Moving beyond intentions and toward the theory oftrying: Effects of work environment and gender on post-adoption information technologyuse. MIS Quarterly, 29, 427–459.

Cassell, J., & Jenkins, H (1998). From Barbie to Mortal Kombat: Gender and computer games.Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Christy, K., & Fox, J. (2014). Leaderboards in a virtual classroom: A test of stereotype threat andsocial comparison explanations for women's math performance. Computers &Education, 78, 66–77. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2014.05.005

Deterding, S., Björk, S., Nacke, L., Dixon, D., & Lawley, E. (2013). Designing gamification:Creating gameful and playful experiences. Proceedings of the CHI Conference on HumanFactors in Computing Systems: Changing Perspectives, Paris, France. 3263–3266.doi:10.1145/2468356.2479662


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer
 
Thursday, June 18
 

10:30am

CON05.09 - Creating, implementing and evaluating flipped classroom e-learning
There are numerous approaches to flipped learning. We define flipped learning as structured learning that occurs outside the traditional classroom setting. Students are exposed to content before coming to class, freeing up class time for deeper learning (versus information transfer). In our program, we create e-learning modules that typically consist of videos with embedded questions that guide student inquiry. Students are given related assignments that they do independently or collaboratively. During class, active learning strategies are used to further explore the e-learning content and homework assignments. This session will focus on our flipped learning approach--specifically the development and implementation of e-learning modules, and evaluation of their impact on student learning. Faculty of Nursing and the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology will share a template for designing and developing e-learning modules for flipped learning. Some questions to guide our discussion are: What types of didactic content are appropriate for e-learning module conversion? When creating videos for e-learning modules, how should content be recorded and edited to promote student engagement and learning? What other instructional technology can be used to enhance collaborative learning among students and between students and faculty? How are guest speakers best utilized in e-videos? We will provide examples of videos that facilitate learning. This session will include how rubrics are used to guide student learning; and how faculty use them for formative and summative evaluations. In our program, we design specific learning objectives and rubrics to accompany our e-learning modules, class activities and graded assignments.

Grossman, R. (2008). Structures for facilitating student reflection. College Teaching, 57(1), 15-22.

Kiteley, R., & Ormrod, G. (2009). Towards a team-based, collaborative approach to embedding e-learning within undergraduate nursing programmes. Nurse Education Today, 29, 623-629. 

Ryan, M., & Ryan, M. (2012). Theorising a model for teaching and assessing reflective learning in higher education. Higher Education Research & Development, 32(2), 244-257. 

The University of British Columbia Flipped Network (2014). Available at: http://flippedlab.learning.University of British Columbia.ca/2013/09/14/flipped-lab-examining-what-works-in-a-flipped-classroom



Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am
Cypress 1 Room

11:30am

CON06.04 - Facilitating learners' workplace research
Introduction: Workplace learning may be well recognized yet the integration of graduate research into the workplace is less common. It can provide meaningful opportunities for learners to generate new evidence that is valuable for learners and the workplace. A model to support learners and supervisors in workplace research (Helyer, 2011; Liyanage, et al. 2013) that was created for online distance graduate program provides an example for facilitating graduate students’ workplace research. Analysis of retrospective and prospective evaluation data provides strong evidence of the model’s effectiveness for students and is considered in light of Cooke’s model for building research capacity (2005).

Objectives: Participants will be able to: (a) assess the potential of modifying an established model for facilitating workplace research for their discipline and (b) judge the value of the ideas shared by colleagues for supporting and growing learners’ opportunities to do workplace research.

Approach: After a brief introduction to the model and evaluation findings, participants will assess the model, explore ideas for applying the model in different contexts, suggest challenges, and ways to modify the model for their own discipline. Ideas generated will be distributed post-session.

Conclusion: Participation in workplace research requires careful design and planning, collaboration and the right support. Enhancing awareness of facilitators of workplace research can spark ideas for overcoming barriers that impede the growth of meaningful workplace research. 

References:

Cooke, J. (2005). A framework to evaluate research capacity building in health care. BMC Family Practice, 6, 44. doi:10.1186/1471-2296-6-44

Helyer, H. (2011). Aligning higher education with the world of work. Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, 1(2), 95-105. doi: 10.1108/20423891111128872

Liyanage, L., Strachan, R., Penlington, R., & Casselde, B. (2013). Design of educational systems for work based learning (WBL): The learner experience. Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, 3(1), 51-61. doi: 10.1108/20423891311294984


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Mackenzie Room

11:30am

CON06.09 - Physical spaces shape head spaces: Transforming teaching practices (Sponsored by STEELCASE - 2015 Gold Sponsor)
An industrial model of spatial and behavioral conditioning and the corresponding didactic teaching practices that they promote has been education’s norms for over a century . Today, multiple, diverse and powerful forces are pushing higher education to reconsider how to make teaching practice more effective. In this session, we will explore how our physical spaces need to change to promote new modes of teaching and learning and share examples of how new active learning spaces have changed both the “how” and the “what” of learning. We will then engage participants in an interactive session using the Steelcase Design Thinking Protocol that progresses from “Know” to “Wonder” to “Learn”. First, we will engage you in a discussion of what you already KNOW: (1) think back to a time you did your best work, (2) think back to a powerful learning e xperience, (3) where do you believe your students do their best learning, and (4) can you describe in detail what physical space(s) you were in for each? We will then pose the question, “WHAT DO YOU WONDER?” If you believe education is about learning, what responsibility do we have as educators and/or education administrators to focus on how best to foster learning instead of how to promote teaching? Finally, we will end with WHAT DID YOU LEARN about what you can do next? This form of intention setting helps to translate ideas into action, and to change our headspace so we can make progress in transforming teaching practice.


Scott-Webber, L. (2004). In_sync: Environment behavior theory and the design of learning places. MI: The Society for College and University Planning.

Hackett, J. P. (2007). Preparing for the perfect product launch. Harvard Business Review, pp 45-50

This session is sponsored by STEELCASE (2015 Gold Sponsor)





Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Salon 1

11:30am

CON06.11 - Small FLICS to big flips: A step-by-step process to flip your classroom
Flipped Learner-Centred Interactive Classroom Strategies (FLICS) provides a framework to create deep learning experiences for students using active learning strategies. Flipped learning flips the traditional homework vs. class time paradigm (Gerstein, 2012; Strayer, 2011). Lectures along with other resources and activities are moved online to focus class time on activities that allow instructors and students to work together with the course material (Bergmann & Sams, 2012). As flipping the entire classroom or course can be a daunting task it has been suggested that starting small with microflips (Buemi, 2014) should alleviate the anxiety of flipping an entire course. In such, FLICS was developed to facilitate the step-by-step process of supporting instructors to create a flipped learning environment. By starting small, instructors are able to focus on creating a positive, adaptable meaningful learning experience for both instructor and students. Current flipped frameworks (Gerstein, 2012; Strayer, 2011) provide a high-level conceptual overview of how a flipped classroom works. The FLICS model, however, provides a visual step-by-step guide to flipped learning by integrating and sequencing online and classroom activities while highlighting the role of both instructor and student in the learning process. This interactive session will provide an opportunity for participants to collaborate with peers, share ideas, and develop practical skills to flip their own classroom by providing participants the opportunity to:

1. Conceptualize how to incorporate a flipped approach into their educational practice
2. Discuss the instructor and student roles in flipped learning
3. Create their own flipped lesson using FLICS

References:

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom. Reach every student in every class every day. ISTE, Eugene: Oregon.

Buemi, S. (2014, April). Microflipping: a modest twist on the ‘flipped’ classroom. The Chronicle of Higher Education, Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/article/Microflipping-a-Modest-Twist/145951/?cid=wb&utm_source=wb&utm_medium=en

Gerstein, J. (2012). The flipped classroom model: A full picture. Retrieved from https://www.scribd.com/doc/98582232/Jackie-Gerstein-The-Flipped-Classroom-Model

Strayer, J. (2011). Flipped Classroom: The flipped classroom infographic. Retrieved from http://www.knewton.com/flipped-classroom/



Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Salon 3

11:30am

CON06.13 - Lightboard 101: Creating naturally engaging video content for flipped learning
At a growing number of educational institutions, faculty have been using a Lightboard to create engaging instructional videos for online and blended learning environments, allowing the instructor to employ gestures as he or she would in a typical classroom setting. Creating engaging online content can be a challenge. Have you ever found it difficult to explain something without using your hands or waving your arms? Gestures are among our most heavily relied-upon student engagement tools, and we often use them as such without even realizing it. Gestures also aid learning, since they “provide the material that ‘glues’ layers of perceptually accessible entities and abstract concepts" (Roth & Welzel, 2001 p.103). It is not surprising that many educators who excel in the classroom face challenges creating engaging instructional videos, since many instructional video production techniques are not conducive to the integration of gestures; even when screen capture software incorporates the instructor's face on camera, it is still difficult for the instructor to interact with the content by pointing, annotating, drawing, etc. During this interactive session, you will find out what the Lightboard is, learn how it is used, and discover its possibilities as a teaching tool. Through testimonials, student feedback and educator feedback, you will witness how the Lightboard is transforming virtual learning environments and impacting student learning. You will view Lightboard-created content, observe the intuitive video creation process and perhaps even get the opportunity to try your hand at using it! 

Roth, W.-M.,& Welzel, M. (2001). From Activity to gestures and scientific language. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 38, 103-136.

Flevares, L. M., & Perry, M. (2001). How many do you see? The use of nonspoken representations in first-grade mathematics lessons. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93, 330-345.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Buchanan (Humber College)

Lisa Buchanan (Humber College)

Professor, Sport Management, Humber College


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Cypress 2 Room

11:30am

CON06.CreativeDiscussion02 - The harmony of dissonance: Teaching and learning players
As instructors and leaders in the educational community the desire to constantly transform our teaching practice and create meaningful learning opportunities for students remains a constant priority. Augusto Boal, founder of the Theatre of the Oppressed and a student of Paolo Friere, stated that, “To transform is to be transformed. The action is, in itself transforming “ (Boal, 1979, p. xxi). Through this interactive session, designed collectively by faculty, graduate students and educational developers, the “actors” will transform themselves into characters that face dissonance in their teaching practice. This Theatre for Living format (Diamond, 2007) will explore issues including academic integrity, English as an additional language, technology use in the classroom, student motivation and more through short lightly-scripted and improvised scenes. In this active space where everyone (audience and actor, alike) become creators, participants are able to re-imagine problems and conundrums, explore creative possibilities without fear of failure and honour the personal and relational dynamics inherent in any issue. Meant to provoke dialogue and engage the senses, facilitated conversation will follow each of the scenes. Each scene will be influenced by current research in the aforementioned topics and provide an opportunity for participants to share their own practices and ways of addressing issues. Due to the improvisatory nature of this session, there will also be the opportunity to incorporate relevant themes that emerge throughout the conference.

Boal, A. (1979) Theatre of the oppressed. New York, NY: Theatre Communications Group.

Diamond, D. (2007) Theatre for living. Victoria, BC: Trafford Publishing.

Speakers
SF

Sheri Fabian

Dr. Sheri Fabian is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Criminology at Simon Fraser University. Her teaching and research focus on minorities and justice, qualitative research methods, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. She is a mentor for the graduate student Certificate... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
STLHE Registration Desk

1:45pm

RTD.33 - Academics in the open: Exploring networked, participatory, and open practices
In recent years there has been increasing attention given to conceptions of “openness” in teaching, learning, and scholarship. Openness in education can take many forms: the use of open educational resources in the classroom; opening access to learning through venues like MOOCs; or the use of open, networked, participatory practices to share and collaborate (Price 2013). While some see only benefits of openness, others worry about the possible implications for academic institutions, identities, and practices (Weller, 2011). Yet as openness gains popularity, academics today find themselves in a position where they can either shape, or be shaped by, these practices (Veletsianos & Kimmons, 2012). During this roundtable discussion, we will look at some of the emerging practices of open and networked scholarship and unpack some of the scholarly and media discourse that surrounds it. In particular we will consider: 

- the practices of scholarly participation in online spaces (blogs, social media) and the notions of identity and digital literacy they entail
- the place of open educational resources (open textbooks, open journals, open online courses) and questions of quality, access, and accreditation 
- the impact of open and networked scholarship on higher education systems and practices (pedagogy, tenure)

Participants will be asked to take an active part in the discussion, and will leave with an increased understanding of what it means to be an open and networked scholar and how open practices might benefit their practice. 

Price, D. (2013). Open: How we'll work, live and learn in the future. [Kindle version]. Retrieved from Amazon.com 

Weller, M. (2011). The digital scholar: How technology is transforming scholarly practice. [Kindle version]. Retrieved from Amazon.co.uk.

Veletsianos, G. & Kimmons, R. (2012). Assumptions and Challenges of Open Scholarship. The International Review Of Research In Open And Distance Learning, 13(4), 166-189.

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Shaw

Ashley Shaw

PhD student/instructor, University of British Columbia
I’m working on a PhD in Education. I love technology, and am fascinated by the impact it has on people and society.I wear Converse most of the time.I’m always cynical, generally irreverent, and often offensive.I knit. A lot.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon EF

1:45pm

RTD.34 - Creating a community of writers: Blog-based writing in the active learning classroom
Approaches to teaching disciplinary argumentation that emphasize writing as a social activity help advance students along the novice-expert continuum as they learn to write in the disciplines and genres of higher education (Bazerman, 1994; Peck-MacDonald, 1984). However, while many faculty now assign authentic disciplinary genres, specify particular audiences requiring tailored rhetorical strategies, deploy collaborative writing, and utilize peer review, the feedback loop remains that of assignment submission and evaluation, with the professor-examiner as primary audience (Giltrow, 2012). More faculty are addressing the domains of knowledge that constitute discourse communities: subject knowledge, genre knowledge, rhetorical knowledge, and writing process knowledge (Beaufort, 2007). Yet creating a truly collaborative discourse community in the classroom itself has remained a significant challenge. Recent developments in the design of active learning environments and the availability of blogging platforms now present new opportunities to faculty willing to experiment to address this challenge. This roundtable discussion will present a preliminary framework for matching an active learning classroom environment with a course blogging platform, and then engage participants in a critical discussion of how this framework might be adaptable across content areas. The framework is based on implementations in a writing-intensive environmental literacy course, and a computer programming course on modeling for science majors.

Speakers
avatar for Ian MacKenzie (Dawson College)

Ian MacKenzie (Dawson College)

Founding Director, Writing in the Disciplines at Dawson, Dawson College
WAC&WID, blog-based writing, faculty learning communities, environmental literacy, sustainabilty education, carpentry, skiing, canoe tripping, the weather...


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon EF

1:45pm

RTD.35 - Guideline and instructional design to address privacy concerns in using open platforms for teaching and learning
The use of open platforms in higher education has rapidly expanded to include (but not limited to): building an entire course website; allowing group authoring; and providing a personal portfolio. University of British Columbia widely uses WordPress as an open platform. The popularity of Blogs is ascribed to its flexibility - with the owner having fine-grained control and management over the visibility of the content. Unlike closed-course systems (e.g. Blackboard), contents in Blogs is not - by default - locked behind a registration system. This public-facing content can be improved and iterated upon while students can publish their own content which can be kept beyond a single term. As the popularity of Blogs increases, so do concerns and issues relating to information security and personal privacy. Without providing clear guidelines to bring users’ attention to privacy setting at the beginning of blog-based courses, instructors and students alike are often unaware of the potential risks until a concern is raised. We, a team of instructional designers and technical staff, have worked to prevent and resolve privacy issues and set clear guidelines for course instructors and students.

University of British Columbia Blogs. (n.d.). In University of British Columbia’s e-Learning website. Retrieved from http://elearning.University of British Columbia.ca/blogs/

Schroeder, A., Minocha, S., & Schneider, C. (2010). The strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of using social software in higher and further education teaching and learning. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 26(3), 159-174. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2729.2010.00347.x


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon EF

1:45pm

RTD.36 - If I record it, will they learn? Who benefits from the use of lecture capture technology?
Postsecondary institutions in Canada and abroad are increasingly investing significant financial and people resources in implementing lecture capture technologies, which allow instructors to record their lectures, or part of their lectures, and make them available on the web for students to see at any time and any place (Ford et al., 2012; Owlston et al., 2011). In 2013 the research team from two Canadian institutions collected data from 1,891 students and 13 instructors about their use of lecture capture technology in their learning. In addition to collecting data on learners viewing habits, the uses of lecture capture and student final grades, all participants also completed the teaching/learning approaches questionnaire, which determines whether participants used a surface or deep approach to learning. Participants' demographic data were collected too. In this session we will discuss the preliminary results of our research project. Participants will explore a difference in the ways different student subgroups (female/male; surface/deep learners; ESL/non-ESL, etc.) use lecture capture, investigate students’ perception of its benefits, and brainstorm situations in which lecture capture technology can best support learning and teaching in different contexts. This will also be an opportunity for participants to reflect on broader issues of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and the role educational developers can and should play.

Euzent, P., Martin, T., Moskal, P., & Moskal, P. (2011). Assessing student performance and perceptions in lecture capture vs. face-to-face course delivery. Journal of Information Technology Education, 10, 295-307. 

Ford, M. B., Burns, C. E., Mitch, N., & Gomez, M. M. (2012). The effectiveness of classroom capture technology. Active Learning in Higher Education, 13(3), 191-201. 

Owston, R., Lupshenyuk, D., & Wideman, H. (2011). Lecture capture in large undergraduate classes: What is the impact on the teaching and learning environment? The Internet and Higher Education, 14 (4), 262-268.

Shaw, G. P., & Molnar, D. (2011). Non-native English language speakers benefit most from the use of lecture capture in medical school. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, 39(6), 416-420.

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Lyons

Patrick Lyons

Director, Teaching and Learning, Carleton University
Patrick Lyons is the Director, Teaching and Learning in the Office of the Associate Vice-President Teaching and Learning at Carleton University. He is responsible for the leadership and direction for Carleton’s initiatives in blended and online learning, educational development... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon EF

1:45pm

RTD.38 - Participant intentions in MOOCs: Defining success for learners in open courses
In early 2015, a western Canadian university offered its first two open courses through the Canvas open course network: 1) learning technologies and 2) innovation in the circumpolar north. Research on both courses is being conducted to determine participants’ activity levels, both planned (participants’ pre-course estimates) and actual (posts to discussion forums and completion of assignments). At the beginning of the study, the researchers believed that completion rates were a poor method of judging success of open courses since they do not take into account the intentions of the participants. For example, some registrants may simply be looking to learn about one or two aspects of the topic, so may be unlikely to complete the entire course, whereas someone whose intention at the start is to complete the course, may have a higher level of participation (Hill, 2013). For this study, participants were asked at the beginning of the courses to indicate the category that best described their planned level of participation: An observer, a drop-in, a passive participant, an active participant, or unsure. These categories are similar to those used in research conducted on the HarvardX MOOCs (Reich, 2014). These results were then compared to actual participation in the courses. This roundtable will explore the findings of the comparison, as well as provide an opportunity for discussion of how this should inform the design and delivery of future iterations of open courses.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon EF

1:45pm

RTD.39 - Participatory lectures from the ground up: Using disciplinary knowledge, personality and background to develop engaging lectures
In a time when there are so many different models of interactive classroom pedagogy to choose from, how do you decide on which one is right for your teaching style and personality? Or when is it best to go it alone and develop your own approach? Roundtable participants will share experiences and brainstorm ideas to these and other questions relevant to creating an interactive classroom model that works for them. Through a university grant program I have been awarded three sequential grants on how to use disciplinary knowledge, background and personality to build meaningful student participation into lecture courses. In keeping with deWinstanley and Bjork (2002) I have “assumed that the fundamental goal of the lecture is to increase student learning beyond what they can learn from the textbook” (p. 19). When I moved from small-class critique-oriented teaching to large lecture courses, active learning moved from during class to sometime afterwards, when students would engage with the material through activities and assignments. Over the last three years I have striven to bring meaningful in-class learning back to my courses. To do this I have experimented with in-lecture activities that have run from a few minutes to three hours; students have worked individually and in groups up to ten; I’ve used clickers, overhead projectors, cell phone cameras and discussion boards; student have worked on paper, computers and shouted out answers. Bring your problems, questions or share your solutions in this lively discussion.

deWinstanley, P. A., & Bjork, R. A. (2002). Successful Lecturing: Presenting Information in Ways That Engage Effective Processing. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 2002(89), 19–31. doi:10.1002/tl.44



Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon EF

1:45pm

RTD.40 - The meaning of service learning reflected through e-learning portfolios
The purpose of this session is to introduce educators to the idea of harmonizing the use of e-learning portfolios with service learning to foster creative learning opportunities for students. Students understanding of the three key outcomes in a service learning course: discovering one’s own personal values and beliefs, understanding diversity, and promoting civic engagement and social responsibility are assessed through reflective components contained within the e-learning portfolio with the use of a rubric. Participants in the conference will be introduced to a service learning course and how e-learning portfolios can enhance student learning and meaning of the three key outcomes. E-learning portfolios offer opportunity for learners to engage in critical reflection through the use of multimedia to make connections between the learning that happens in different contexts, beyond the classroom (Tosh et al., 2005). Service learning is an experiential learning approach that intentionally connects the service experience to academic coursework. Service learning allows students to engage in activities that address human/community connections, incorporates reflection, and embraces the concept of reciprocity between the student and the person/agency being served (Gillis & MacLellan, 2010). The combination of e-learning portfolios and service learning inspires deep learning for students through creative reflection on the meaning of how their in-class and out-of-class experiences fit together (Fullan & Langworthy, 2013). The e-learning portfolio captures the significant occurrences in a student’s life beyond the formal academic and allows them to share these experiences using an integrative learning approach. 

Fullan, M., & Langworthy, M. (2013). Towards a New End: New Pedagogies for Deep Learning. Seattle, WA: Collaborative Impact. Retrieved from www.newpedagogies.org.

Gillis, A., & MacLellan, M. (2010). Service learning with vulnerable populations: Review of the literature. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 7(1). Art. 41, 1-27. doi: 10.2202/1548-923x.2041.

Tosh, D., Penny Light, T., Fleming, K., & Haywood, J. (2005). Engagement with electronic portfolios: Challenges from the student perspective. Canadian Journal of Learning & Technology, 31(3), 89-110.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon EF

3:00pm

CON07.07 - Finding a middle (MOOC) ground: Making space for a global community in the xMOOC
Dave Cormier first introduced the term Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) in 2008 and since then this ‘disruptive innovation’ has seen an increase both in the number of platforms and certainly in the number of course offerings. While it may be too early to properly measure the disruptive impact MOOCs have had, there is no denying that they have sent shock waves across higher education (Shirky, 2012). Whether as a response to budget constraints and efficiency seeking initiatives or as a gateway to innovative practices, MOOCs continue to create a large digital footprint on a global scale. At least two different pedagogical directions have emerged within the MOOC landscape (Rodriguez, 2013): content-based MOOCs (xMOOCs) often take a behaviourist, teacher-centered approach that is the target of numerous critiques, whereas connectivist MOOCs (cMOOCs) leverage autonomy, openness, connections and interactivity. cMOOCs seek to facilitate learning communities that come together in the exploration and discussion of topics of mutual importance. At the same time, cMOOCs have also been critiqued for their potential to alienate the novice online learners that a MOOC might attract (Brennan, 2013). Borrowing from the strengths of both MOOC approaches - that is, fostering meaningful connections between learners while accommodating a large and diverse audience of varying skill levels - was a key consideration in designing McMaster University's first MOOC on Coursera, Experimentation for Improvement. In this presentation, we will outline design decisions around the pedagogy, interface and learner experience that were implemented in the development process and as the course was being delivered in the summer of 2014. We will also speak to steps the design team took towards being inclusive of the global audience that a MOOC is able to reach. Participants will leave the session with several strategies for building community in large online courses while working within the constraints of an xMOOC platform or LMS.

Brennan, Keith (2013). In Connectivism, No One Can Hear You Scream: A Guide to Understanding the MOOC Novice. Retrieved from: http://www.hybridpedagogy.com/journal/in-connectivism-no-one-can-hear-you-scream-a-guide-to-understanding-the-mooc-novice/

Rodriguez, O. (2013). The concept of openness behind c and x-MOOOCs. Open Praxis, 5(1), 67-73.

Shirky, C. (2012). Napster, Udacity, and the Academy. Retrieved from: http://www.shirky.com/weblog/2012/11/napster-udacity-and-the-academy/


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Director Room

3:00pm

CON07.10 - Transforming the student learning experience: Using ePortfolios to engage students in an active research process
This interactive session will focus on what we consider a high impact practice that helped to transform a necessary, but slightly ‘tired’ classroom practice - the research project. In order to create a more meaningful, engaging and transformative learning experience for our students, we piloted ePortfolios. Moving from a paper-based portfolio, often hurriedly pieced together at the end of term, to an ePortfolio project that is visible and accessible to students throughout the term is in-line with transformative learning practices which value the active learner and support different learning styles. ePortfolios can transform the learning experience by providing a venue for students to reflect on and integrate their learning (Eynon, Gambino, & Török, 2014), shifting the emphasis on the process rather than the product and on learning rather than teaching. The use of ePortfolios as active learning tools leads to learning that is “...captured, shared, revised, assessed, presented, reassessed, reflected upon, and integrated…” (Batson, 2011, p. 109). The presenters will share the design stage, assignment guidelines, ePortfolio template, assessment practices, and student ePortfolio examples. Session participants will be guided through a hands-on review and discussion of a sample ePortfolio in terms of four components: digital literacy and multimodal artifacts, high impact practice, documentation of learning process, and reflection. 

References:

Batson, T. (2011). Situated learning: A theoretical frame to guide transformational change using electronic portfolio technology. International Journal of ePortoflio 1(1), 107-109. http://www.theijep.com/pdf/IJEP34.pdf

Eynon, B., Gambino, L. M., & Török, J. (2014). What difference can ePortfolio make? A field report from the Connect to Learning project. International Journal of ePortfolio, 4(1), 95-114.http://www.theijep.com/pdf/IJEP127.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Peggy Hartwick

Peggy Hartwick

Instructor, Carleton University
Peggy was a recipient of the 2015 Brightspace Innovation Award in Teaching and Learning. She is an Instructor and PhD student in the School of Linguistics and Language Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa. As a passionate educator who cares deeply about her students’ learning... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Salon 3

3:00pm

CON07.13 - Knowing the land beneath our feet: Integrating a digital Indigenous walking tour into University of British Columbia classrooms
In this talk, we share our experiences piloting a digital Indigenous walking tour with over 300 undergraduate students. Knowing the Land Beneath Our Feet (KLBF) is a digitally-augmented walking tour of the University of British Columbia’s Vancouver campus, researched and designed by Spencer Lindsay and Sarah Ling with advisors from academic and Indigenous communities on the traditional, unceded, ancestral territory of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ speaking Musqueam people. Using Global Positioning Systems built into cellphones, KLBF augments the University of British Columbia environment with stories, videos, photographs and text drawn from archives and interviews with community members and elders. While the tour is designed for a range of users, this presentation focuses on students’ learning experiences. University of British Columbia Vancouver is marked by a longstanding engagement with Indigenous communities and cultures, but this continued presence remains invisible to the majority of students. This situation is not unique to University of British Columbia. Throughout Canada, Ashok Mathur argues, “if there is any awareness of First Peoples and their inhabitation and proprietorship of this land, it is most frequently mediated through colonial narratives of contact” (3). By sharing Indigenous narratives of the land, KLBF’s pedagogical design provides students the opportunity to connect their learning to local contexts and make their classroom experiences more relevant to their everyday lives. Students engage with campus sites that tell stories, encode values, and point the way to respectful relationships with Musqueam and other First Nations. The tour asks participants to, in Paulette Regan’s words, “learn to listen differently” (15) to Indigenous histories and to reconsider their own histories and their place on this territory. During our session, we demonstrate how students navigate the tour and show examples of sites they visit. We share challenges and successes in how we integrated this technology into our course designs, blended in- and beyond-the-classroom learning environments, identified learning objectives and assessed these objectives through activities and assignments. More broadly, we reflect on the ways that digital campus walking tours might contribute to students’ deeper appreciation and understandings of Indigenous histories and issues in colonized and contested spaces (see Claxton, Loft and Townsend 2005; Loft 2014). 

Claxton, D., Loft, S., & Townsend, M. (Eds.). (2005). Transference, tradition, technology: Native new media. Hamilton: Walter Phillips Gallery Editions. 

Loft, S. (Ed.). (2014). Coded territories: Tracing Indigenous pathways in new media art. University of Calgary Press.

Mathur, Ashok, Jonathan Dewar, and Mike Degagné (Eds). (2011). Cultivating Canada: Reconciliation through the lens of cultural diversity. Aboriginal Healing Foundation Research Series. 

Regan, Paulette. (2011). Unsettling the Settler Within: Indian Residential Schools, truth telling, and reconciliation in Canada. University of British Columbia Press.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

3:45pm

CON08.07 - Transforming the first year writing experience: Blended learning in the composition classroom
Writing instruction which aids undergraduate researchers in effectively articulating their ideas is intellectually transformative and vital to the ongoing health of scholarly communities. Yet many current composition classrooms experience challenging conditions due to size (which reduces opportunities for hands-on learning and prompt, individualized feedback). Canadian composition classes average between 30 and 40 students, well exceeding the long-standing Association of Departments of English (ADE) policy statement, which advocates composition class sizes of no more than twenty students (ADE/ MLA, 1992). At a first year level, these classes also rarely have the opportunity to address disciplinary differences in writing and so students do not perceive themselves as entering a research community when they choose their area of study. While online composition courses can offer more opportunities for writing, the isolation and lack of peer interaction can decrease students’ motivation and be antithetical to the notion of entering a scholarly community (Boyd, 2008). This presentation reports on a pilot blended learning approach for first year writing classes which sought to address these size, feedback, and disciplinary issues. The approach incorporated online instructional videos and content slides, as well as online writing assignments, which meant that students physically attended approximately half the class meetings and worked independently for the remainder. Such strategies sought to increase timely individualized feedback opportunities and offer more as-needed, disciplinary-based content, while still creating a learning community and adding to the sparse research on blended learning in Canadian composition classrooms. Findings from comparative analysis of control and pilot group surveys suggest that the blended approach’s increased opportunities for online writing and additional feedback aided student learning. Online content, however, appeared less helpful. These findings will be contextualized in relation to existing studies on blended learning in U.S. composition classrooms (eg. Gouge, 2009; Middlebrook, 2013), and the presentation will conclude with participant discussion of additional blended writing strategies. 

References: 
Association of Departments of English. (1992). ADE Guidelines for Class Size and Workload for College and University Teachers of English: A Statement of Policy. Retrieved from http://www.ade.org/policy/policy_guidelines.htm 

Boyd, P.W. (2008). Analyzing students’ perceptions of their learning in online and hybrid first-year composition courses. Computers and Composition, 25, 224–243.

Gouge, C. (2009). Conversation at a crucial moment: Hybrid courses and the future of writing programs. College English 71(4), 338-362. 

Middlebrook, R. H. (2013). Degree of hybridity: Peer review in the blended composition classroom. Journal of Educational Technology, 10(1), 1-9.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Chairman Room

3:45pm

CON08.08 - Achieving harmony in eLearning development: A collaborative discussion
The purpose of this session is to build upon The Transformation to eLearning: A Collaborative Discussion about Lessons Learned session from STLHE 2014. The outcome of that session was to determine common successes and challenges faced by participants during their experiences transforming higher education curriculum to an eLearning format. While the Canadian Council on Learning (2009) defines eLearning as “the application of computer technologies to education” (p. 4), we situate that within the context of the development and delivery of hybrid, blended, and fully-online curriculum. This year, we intend to build upon our 2014 session by addressing the identified, disparate successes – positive student and faculty feedback, and increased institutional collaboration – and challenges – negative faculty and administrative feedback, lack of resource allocation, challenges with intellectual property and privacy, and effectiveness of implementation – experienced during the development of eLearning curriculum. During the session, participants will discuss strategies employed and/or formulate new ideas to address dissonance between student, faculty, and administrative satisfaction with and support for eLearning processes and products and collaborate with participants from across Canadian higher education institutions regarding successes and challenges experienced with their institutions’ eLearning efforts. Attendance at our 2014 session is not necessary to participating in this collaborative discussion! This session is relevant to faculty, educational developers and administrators seeking to refine existing practices or implement best practices (Boettcher & Conrad, 2010) for achieving harmony with all stakeholders in the development of effective eLearning (Clark & Mayer, 2011) and in doing so, furthering the field of eLearning development.

References:

• Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R. M. (2010). The Online Teaching Survival Guide: Simple and Practical Pedagogical Tips. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
• Canadian Council on Learning. (2009). State of E-learning in Canada. Retrieved from http://www.ccl-cca.ca/pdfs/E-learning/E-Learning_Report_FINAL-E.PDF
• Clark, R. C., & Mayer, R. E. (2011). E-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning (3rd Edition). Hoboken, NJ: Pfeiffer.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Taylor (Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College)

Rebecca Taylor (Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College)

Coordinator, Technology-Enabled Learning, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College



Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Director Room

3:45pm

CON08.11 - Reducing presentation anxiety by using active learning classrooms
Creating harmony in the classroom starts with fostering a welcoming atmosphere that fosters a safe learning environment, yet even in the safest classroom a persistent fear for most students is presenting in front of the class (Furmark, 2002). Presentation anxiety can lead to a lifelong crippling fear of speaking in front of audiences (small or large) (MacKenzie & Fowler, 2013) and can cause students to avoid disciplines or careers they could have thrived in and been very successful (Stein, et al., 1996; Van Ameringen, et al., 2003). Because presentations are a large part of students’ academic experience and future careers, the purpose of this presentation is to ignite discussion on how spatial configuration and technology in a given classroom can facilitate or reduce presentation anxiety. Participants are invited to think back to their experience as students and/or as an instructor seeing students express anxiety during presentations. They will fill out a questionnaire on presentation anxiety by imagining themselves as a student presenting in a traditional room and then in an Active Learning Classroom (ALCs), and share their responses with a partner. Next, a brief summary will be given on a case study in which one course used the spatial configuration and technology in ALCs to scaffold presentation skills that led to students building confidence in their presentation skills. This will be followed by a discussion with participants on how their first discussions compare with the results from the study, and together brainstorm what aspects they would take away from this session to implement into their classrooms. 

Furmark, T. (2002). Social phobia: overview of community surveys. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 105(2), 84-93.

MacKenzie, M. B., & Fowler, K. F. (2013). Social anxiety disorder in the Canadian population: Exploring gender differences in sociodemographic profile.Journal of anxiety disorders, 27(4), 427-434.

Stein, M. B., Walker, J. R., & Forde, D. R. (1996). Public-speaking fears in a community sample: Prevalence, impact on functioning, and diagnostic classification. Archives of General Psychiatry, 53(2), 169-174. 

Van Ameringen, M., Mancini, C., & Farvolden, P. (2003). The impact of anxiety disorders on educational achievement. Journal of anxiety disorders, 17(5), 561-571.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Salon 3

4:30pm

CON09.09 - E-learning, e-quality
Humber College ITAL has undertaken a systematic approach to the development and renewal of online courses, as part of an institutional goal to ensure excellence in quality of all e-learning environments. As part of this initiative, Humber’s Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL) conducted both an extensive faculty engagement and consultation process and a survey of students as a means to inform the development of Humber’s e-Learning Strategy. Data was collected from over 1200 student surveys and round table discussions with more than 50 faculty. While quality was the most prevalent theme that emerged from both participant groups, analysis of responses across groups suggests different understandings of the purposes, processes and outcomes of online learning and how these relate to measures of quality e-learning experiences. As well, variation was evident between faculty understandings and existing research on quality e-Learning. By sharing results from both studies, this presentation aims to surface assumptions and identify the tensions between student and faculty perceptions on e-learning. Examples of how these tensions are reflected in learning environments, including the actual development and delivery of online courses, will be highlighted and session participants will be invited to contribute examples from their own institutions. Additionally, as part of Humber’s commitment to quality e-learning, the CTL and the Department of Program Planning Development and Renewal have created tools and processes to support faculty development specific to deepening understanding and skills related to online teaching and learning. Again, participants will be encouraged to draw on their experiences online teaching and learning and share existing and emerging professional development practices that support faculty to offer quality e-learning experiences. Discussions will enable the querying of current practices and the identification of future opportunities.

Amundsen, C. & Wilson, M. (2012). Are we asking the right questions? A conceptual review of the educational development literature in higher education. Review of Educational Research, 82(1), 90–126.

Balacheff, N., Ludvigsen, S., de Jong , T., Lazonder, A. & Barnes, S. (2009). Technology-Enhanced Learning: Principles and Products. Springer.

Cox, B. E., McIntosh, K. L., Reason, R. D., & Terenzini, P. T. (2011). A culture of teaching: Policy, perception, and practice in higher education. Research in Higher Education, 52(8), 808-829.

Yee, K., & Hargis, J. (2012). Indirect Faculty Development and the Role of Sociability. Journal on Centers for Teaching & Learning, 4, 61-78.


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Salon 1
 
Friday, June 19
 

8:30am

CON10.01 - Technology enabled learning: Transforming inter-professional ethics education in health and human service programs at the University of British Columbia
The health and human service programs at the University of British Columbia are in the process of planning, testing, and evaluating a framework for an integrated curricular approach to common learning. An ethics curriculum marks the first step in moving towards this integrated approach to health professional education. This curriculum supports learning that is unique to each profession, seeks economies of scale for foundational knowledge common to all programs through technology, and creates relevant opportunities for interprofessional learning in complex areas of healthcare (Mitchell et al., 2012). Using technology-enabled learning (TEL) to ensure asynchronous, flexible, interactive, and cost effective delivery (Pulman, Scammell, & Martin, 2009), the curriculum will transverse the classroom to practice continuum. The curriculum is unique in its integrated approach that incorporates interprofessional learning in an innovative way. The overarching goal of ethics curriculum is to graduate health professionals from all disciplines who can enact and provide leadership for ethical practice. The objective of this interactive session is to present the integrated approach that uses TEL for the delivery of common ethics content to multiple disciplines. This session will be of interest to faculty and educational developers seeking innovative ways to use TEL for interprofessional education. Presenters will briefly describe the development of the curriculum and demonstrate an online introductory module as a foundation for further learning in the curriculum. Participants will then in activities to get a sense of how online components support interactive face-to-face learning. Finally in small groups, participants will discuss how an integrated approach may compliment teaching in their respective fields.

References:

Institute of Medicine. (2012). Core Principles & Values of Effective Team-Based Health Care. Washington, DC: Mitchell, P., Wynia, M., Golden, R., McNellis, B., Okun, S., Webb, C. E., …Von Kohorn, I. Pulman, A., Scammell, J., & Martin, M. (2009). Enabling interprofessional education: The role of technology to enhance learning. Nurse Education Today 29, 232 – 239.

Speakers
VW

Victoria Wood (University of British Columbia)

Curriculum Developer, University of British Columbia
I have been working in the education field, focusing on interprofessional education and collaboration, for almost 10 years. I support the development and delivery of interprofessional curriculum across the continuum of learning, including university-based health science education... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am
Bayshore Salon ABC

8:30am

CON10.02 - Flexible Learning strategies in Land, Food and Community series courses: Sharing our experiences
What does Flexible Learning (FL) mean to you? In this 45-minute interactive session, our teaching team will present how FL, an instructional approach allowing flexibility of time, place, and audience through the use of technologies (Khan, 2007), is integrated in the Land, Food and Community (LFC) series of courses in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia. We invite you to share your understanding and experience with FL strategies, which, for us, have been promoted and implemented for over a decade. FL has achieved success indicated by course evaluations and testimonies from students, the teaching team, and community partners (Rojas, 2009). We will focus on three themes: 1) objectives and designing process of using FL as pedagogical approach, 2) improvement and challenges in implementation, and 3) evaluation strategies. We will invite you to discuss each theme based on your engagement with FL in your specific context. Using a wiki page as the platform (a FL strategy we use regularly), you and the teaching team will collaboratively document our discussions. We will maintain this wiki page for further discussion and collaboration after the session ends. This session will showcase the various FL strategies applied in the LFC series courses, offer you first-hand experience with a FL strategy (wiki), and promote discussions among delegates who are interested in FL strategies and pedagogical reform in higher education. 

Key words: Flexible Learning, sharing experience, active learning strategies, community-based experiential learning 

References

Khan, B. H. (2007). Flexible Learning in an information society. Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Rojas, A. (2009). Towards integration of knowledge through sustainability education and its potential contribution to environmental security. In S. Allen-Gil, L. Stelljes, & O. Borysova (Eds.), Addressing global environmental security through innovative educational curricula (pp. 131–153). Springer Netherlands. Retrieved from http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4020-9314-2_14

Lead Speaker(s)
Speakers
avatar for Alice Cassidy

Alice Cassidy

Principal, In View Education and Professional Development
Alice Cassidy is an educational developer, science educator and wildlife biologist. She has designed, taught and coordinated courses at the University of British Columbia, and led large-scale educational programs. As a consultant, she leads workshops on teaching and learning. She... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am
Bayshore Salon D

8:30am

CON10.06 - Incorporating flexible/blended learning into the Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW)
Training the teachers of tomorrow requires evolving professional development opportunities within the landscape of technology tools in education. The Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW) is a peer-based workshop that emphasises learner-centred teaching based around Kolbs experiential learning cycle (Dawson et al, 2014), providing pedagogy combined with the unique opportunity for ISW participant to teach 3 lessons and receiving facilitated peer feedback (Day 2004). Since the development of the ISW in 1978 the workshop has adapted to substantial changes in teaching and learning. Following the Flexible Learning Initiative at University of British Columbia and similar initiatives at other universities, a working group of ISW facilitators has been incorporating flexible/blended learning into the ISW to respond to the evolving needs of faculty and graduate student professional development given an increasing emphasis on blended and online learning in their teaching and learning practice. In this session we will share successes, difficulties, and opportunities incorporating Flexible Learning into the ISW. We will explore a planning and design process that moved away from traditional instructional design models and instead emphasized collaboration, open practice and iterative approaches to planning out the course revisions (Allen 2012). Attendees at this session will participate and engage in flexible/blended modes of instruction, providing a metacognitive approach to discussing applications of flexible/blended learning within the ISW, an internationally recognized 24 hour peer based teacher training workshop. Attendees will create and develop resources for Professional Development of flexible/blended pedagogies. Attendees will have access to shared open resources to apply to their practice.

Speakers
avatar for Judy Chan

Judy Chan

Education Consultant, Faculty Liaison, University of British Columbia
UBC
avatar for Lucas Wright

Lucas Wright

Open Strategist (Leave Appointment), BCcampus
UBC


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am
Thompson Room

9:30am

CON11.07 - Guiding students with extra feedback
Research shows that students tend to be overly optimistic about their learning, with the weakest students over-estimating their progress the most (Kruger & Dunning, 1999). This can hinder students’ academic success, as they have no reason to change their behavior if they believe they are already doing well. As instructors, we can mitigate this tendency by providing students with extra feedback, beyond the marks and comments they traditionally receive. This session will begin by describing several forms of supplementary feedback that could be useful in your courses. One simple approach is to provide students with realistic practice exams, and then discuss the rationale behind each answer (Strasser, 2003). Another method asks students to keep journals in which they reflect on their learning successes and difficulties (Pavlovich, Collins and Jones, 2009). Technology can also facilitate extra feedback. Purdue University’s “Signals” system displays color-coded “dashboards” on students’ cell phones to remind them whether they are following good study habits in each course (Pistilli & Arnold, 2010). Experiments at Brock University give students forward-looking guidance by forecasting their end-of-course grades while the course is still underway (Armstrong, 2013). We will then open the floor for discussion. What do you think of these extra feedback tools? Which ones would likely work, or not, in your own classes? What feedback techniques have you used or considered, and what success have you had?

Armstrong, M.J. (2013). A preliminary study of grade forecasting for students. Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education, 11 (2), 193-210.

Pavlovich, K., Collins, E., & Jones, G. (2009). Developing students' skills in reflective practice: design and assessment. Journal of Management Education, 33 (1), 37-58.

Pistilli, M.D., & Arnold, K.E. (2010). Purdue signals: mining real-time academic data to enhance student success. About Campus: Enriching the student learning experience, 15 (3), 22-24.

Strasser, S.E. (2003). Will this be on the exam? or, How to get students to study more. Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education, 1 (1), 155-158.



Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am
Chairman Room

9:30am

CON11.13 - Engaging international students in a technology-enabled, collaborative classroom: Shifting the dialogue from rhetoric to reality
Interest in international students has produced an ambitious research agenda in Canada, where it is estimated that they comprise ten percent of the country’s postsecondary population (Canadian Bureau for International Education, 2015). Although numerous queries contribute to this growing body of scholarship, few address the potential for classroom technology to transform the academic experience of international learners. To remedy this gap, Humber College has undertaken an initiative to measure the impact of a technology-enhanced, collaborative classroom on student engagement with a particular interest in levels of engagement among international learners. Student engagement as a locus of inquiry is derived from interdisciplinary scholarship that posits that the consistent demonstration of engagement-related behaviours is one of the greatest predictors of scholastic achievement (Kahu, 2013). It is broadly defined in our study as “the time and physical energy that students spend on activities in their academic experience” (Robinson & Hullinger 2008, p. 101). Although our study will measure levels of engagement among all students, our ultimate interest in international learners recognizes that this particular demographic continues to experience unique scholastic barriers in spite of institutional efforts to mitigate these challenges (Bartram, 2008). Consequently, this session will illuminate how Humber’s technology-enabled collaborative learning environments influence basic engagement-related behaviors among all Humber students, including our international student population. By the end of this interactive session participants will: (1) understand how the purposeful use of various classroom technologies, such as those used in our project, can contribute to student engagement among diverse groups of learners and (2) apply selected strategies to practice to shift the dialogue from rhetoric to reality. 

Bartram, B. (2008). Supporting international students in higher education: constructions, cultures and clashes. Teaching in Higher Education, 13(6), 657 – 668

Canadian Bureau for International Education (2015). Facts and figures: Canada’s performance in international education, 2014. Retrieved from http://www.cbie.ca/about-ie/facts-and-figures/

Kahu, E.R. (2013). Framing student engagement in higher education. Studies in Higher Education, 38(5), 758 – 773

Robinson, C. & Hullinger, H. (2008, November/December). New benchmarks in higher education: student engagement in online learning. Journal of Education for Business, 101 – 108


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am
Cypress 2 Room

10:45am

CON12.07 - Flip this classroom: Changing post-secondary teaching environments
Are we looking at the end of the lecture or does it still have a role in post-secondary education? Are SCALE-UP classrooms and the flipped pedagogy the panacea to reform modern educational institutions? This interactive presentation will explore these questions and more, as we look deeper into how our physical teaching and learning environments affect pedagogy. In 2012, the University of Lethbridge initiated the Learning Environment Evaluation (LEE) Project to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching and learning spaces, and to inform the planning process of future spaces (new construction and renovations). In summer 2014, the LEE project expanded with the modification of 3 classrooms on campus, creating 3 unique active learning environments, including our first SCALE-UP classroom. SCALE-UP classrooms have been shown to have significant impact on student performance and engagement in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines (Beichner, 2008; Benson, Orr, Biggers, Moss, Ohland, & Schiff, 2010; Freeman et al., 2014). However, the majority of instructors who have utilized the SCALE –UP room at the University of Lethbridge have been from outside of these disciplines. This has focused our research on the effectiveness of this space for teaching across disciplines. The goal of this presentation is to share the results of our research and spark a debate regarding the impact of the physical classroom on teaching and learning. We will also engage in a discussion about new pedagogies, such as the flipped classroom, and the impact it has on student performance.

Beichner, R. J. (2008). The SCALE-UP project: A student-centered, active learning environment for undergraduate programs. An invited white paper for the National Academy of Sciences. Retrieved from http://physics.ucf.edu/~bindell/PHY%202049%20SCALE-UP%20Fall%202011/Beichner_CommissionedPaper.pdf

Benson, L. C., Orr, M. K., Biggers, S. B. Moss, W. F., Ohland, M. W. & Schiff, S. D. (2010). Student-centered active, cooperative learning in engineering. International Journal of Engineering Education, 26(5), 1097-1110.

Freeman, S., Eddy, S. L., McDonough, M., Smith, M. K., Okoroafor, N., Jordt, H., Wenderoth, M. P. (2014). Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(23), 8410-8415. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1319030111

Speakers
avatar for David Hinger (University of Lethbridge)

David Hinger (University of Lethbridge)

Director - Teaching Centre, University of Lethbridge
David Hinger completed a BFA in multimedia in the spring of 2003, and a Master of Education degree in spring 2007 from the University of Lethbridge. He joined the CRDC in January 2003, and assumed the Director position in July 2007. In September of 2007 David assumed additional responsibilities... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am
Director Room

10:45am

CON12.10 - Designing and teaching our first fully online undergraduate course as a team: Successes and challenges
Effective education through online learning often depends on sound e-Pedagogy, clearly articulated goals, measurable outcomes, committed and dedicated instructors, and excellent support from educational developers (Li & Akins, 2005). In this talk, presenters will share their experiences with designing and delivering their first online course as a team. New to online teaching, four faculty members from diverse academic ranks and practical experience levels worked together over a period of three months to articulate and apply the topic of e-Pedagogy to design an innovative course that would engage students not only with the content area but also with technology supportive of the chosen pedagogy. Challenged to come to terms with their understandings (and often misunderstandings) of what an effective online course should look like, the instructors engaged in regular meetings with educational developers to discuss and reconcile their visions for the course with research-supported pedagogical techniques and educational technologies (including a 3D environment) available to bring the learning scenarios to life. The actual implementation of the course, in turn, carried with it unforeseen trials as well as much welcomed triumphs. Participants in this session will leave with a first-hand experience of the said course and an understanding of the challenges and successes that can come from collaboratively designed and team-taught online courses.

Li, Q., & Akins, M. (2005). Sixteen myths about online teaching and learning in higher education: Don’t believe everything you hear. TechTrends, 49, 51-50.

Speakers
avatar for Peggy Hartwick

Peggy Hartwick

Instructor, Carleton University
Peggy was a recipient of the 2015 Brightspace Innovation Award in Teaching and Learning. She is an Instructor and PhD student in the School of Linguistics and Language Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa. As a passionate educator who cares deeply about her students’ learning... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am
Salon 3