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Achieving Harmony: Tuning into Practice

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Learners Considerations and Support [clear filter]
Wednesday, June 17
 

12:00pm

CON02.03 - Australian universities’ use of learning analytics for increased student retention
As learning analytics utilizing “big data” relating to student performance become more sophisticated, individual teaching academics are being encouraged to leverage this rich information for the improvement of student success and the student experience (Beer, Jones & Clark 2012, Ferguson 2012, Clow 2013). This presentation reports findings from a national, federally-funded study including 29 Australian universities and over 400 university teachers, determining the maturity of the universities’ implementation of learning analytics for the improvement of student retention. Data was collected via an institutional level survey, an academic level survey and semi-structured interviews of teaching academics. Twenty-two institutions and over 350 teaching academics from across Australia responded to the institutional/individual surveys relating to their use/intentions for use of Learning Analytics data for the purposes of student retention and success. Survey and interview findings reveal that the use of analytics is embraced more actively by senior university leaders and teaching and learning and institutional research professionals than by individuals teaching in the classroom. Recommendations will be made relating to the increased readiness, encouragement and engagement of university teachers in learning analytics with student retention as an outcome. Participants will engage in a structured activity considering a formal model for universities’ implementation of learning analytics for student retention. They will be asked to determine the maturity level of their institutions in the use of learning analytics as well as how they feel that their own role and experience affects their view of the analytics wave that is changing how we support students worldwide. 

Beer, C., Jones, D., & Clark, D. (2012). Analytics and complexity: Learning and leading for the future. In M. Brown, M Hartnett & T. Stewart (Eds.), Future Challenges, Sustainable Futures (proceedings ASCILITE, Wellington, 2012), (pp.78-87). Retrieved from http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/ wellington12/ 2012/images/custom/asclite2012_proceedings.pdf

Clow, D. (2013). An overview of learning analytics, 

Ferguson, R. 2012. Learning analytics: Drivers, developments and challenges. International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 4(5/6), 304–317. doi:10.1504/IJTEL.2012.051816


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Mackenzie Room

12:00pm

CON02.11 - Exploring the impact of a fall break policy on student mental health outcomes
Increasing attention is being paid to the mental health of university and college students as they report higher levels of stress and anxiety than that of the general population (Stallman, 2010). As mental illness commonly develops between the ages of fifteen and twenty-four (Eisenberg, Golberstein, Gollust, & Hefner, 2007) post-secondary students are at particular risk. In fact, the higher stress levels associated with being a first year university student alone lead to higher dropout rates than either anxiety or depression (Tamin, 2013). Many universities across Ontario are implementing a policy for a fall break in hopes of alleviating students’ stress and anxiety in order to improve mental health, heighten retention, and increase academic productivity. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of an educational policy change to institute a fall break on student stress and retention. A mixed methods methodology is used to collect self-reported qualitative and quantitative indicators of stress and academic achievement along with objective measures of academic achievement and retention using a three-year longitudinal cross-sectional survey design. The Fall Break did decrease students overall stress. Students agree the break was beneficial, that workload did not increase as a result of the break (before or after) and that stress did not increase as a result. The group reporting the greatest benefit was first year students. This research provides comprehensive evidence regarding the utility of a Fall Break to reduce stress and increase retention in order to inform effective education policies in this respect.

Eisenberg, D., Gollust, S. E., Golberstein, E., & Hefner, J. L (2007). Prevalence and correlates of depression, anxiety, and suicidality among university students. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 77(4), 534-542.

Stallman, H. M. (2010). Psychological distress in university students: A comparison with general population data. Australian Psychologist, 45(4), 249-257.

Tamin, S. K. (2013). Relevance of mental health issues in university student dropouts. Occupational Medicine, 63(6), 410-414.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Cypress 1 Room

1:45pm

CON03.03 - Cohort-building and enabling risk and growth
In the IASK Program (Integrated Analytical Skills and Knowledge), students enroll in six integrated, thematic, interdisciplinary courses that aim to foster complex evaluativistic epistemological beliefs (Brownlee 2009) in a cohort-based learning environment. Pizzolato (2008) found that students often “short circuit” their own learning, refusing risk in favour of “getting a grade.” One of IASK’s goals is to intervene in this process by fostering a greater willingness to take intellectual risk. A strong, mutually supportive student cohort is crucial and demands that attention be paid to both “heart and head,” the linking of affective emotional stances to “availing” (Muis 2004) attitudes toward learning and knowledge. We begin this workshop with an interactive cohort-building exercise focused on intellectual risk. Psycho-drama activities will be used to map our relationships with risk onto both body and space to move participants from intellectual, at times anxiety driven, responses to “gut level” or intuitive understandings of complex concepts (Landy, 2003). Such exercises encourage deep learning, making space for “heart responses” emblematic of risk and vulnerability, which in turn foster group cohesion (Corey, 2011). We will conclude with a group discussion of the relationship between cohort-building and a harmonious “whole student” approach to epistemological development, asking participants to reflect on the relationship between “head and heart” in their classrooms and the practical ways that this cohesiveness might be better achieved. The workshop addresses the “Learners consideration and support” stream and contributes to the field of personal epistemology by linking theory to classroom practice for the fostering of positive learning environments.

References:

Brownlee, J., Walker, S., Lennox, S., Exley, B., & Pearce, S. (2009). The first year university experience: Using personal epistemology to understand effective learning and teaching in higher education. Higher Education, 58(5), 599-618.

Corey, G. (2000). Theory and practice of group counseling. Belmont, California: Wadsworth.

Landy, R. J. (2003). Drama Therapy with Adults. In C. E. Schaefer (Ed.) , Play Therapy with Adults (pp. 15-32). New York: J. Wiley.

Pizzolato, J. E. (2007). Meaning making inside and outside the academic arena: Investigating the contextuality of epistemological development in college students. Journal of General Education, 56, 228-251.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Bayshore Salon EF

1:45pm

CON03.12 - Exploring the contextual variables and ethical ideologies that help inform decisions about everyday moral dilemmas in teaching
Educators are regularly confronted with moral dilemmas for which there are no easy solutions. Increasing course sizes and program enrolments coupled with a new consumerist attitude towards education have only further exacerbated the quantity and quality of students’ requests for special academic consideration (Macfarlane, 2004). Extensions, late submissions, and grade bumps – once rare – are now commonplace. However, there is very little in the pedagogical literature that addresses these everyday dilemmas. In a culture of transparency, unspoken policies that inform these requests are the form of learner consideration that is the least transparent to students and educators alike. This session will explore some of the variables that contribute to the complexity of these dilemmas, and the ethical ideologies that can inform their resolution. Our goal is not to provide best practices, but rather to facilitate reflection about how individuals make these decisions. Participants will be presented with fictional vignettes of real-life teaching dilemmas, and asked how they would resolve them, using clicker voting and group discussion. We will then describe the notions of relativism and idealism as two axes that define Forsyth’s (1980) four ethical ideologies, and help participants identify their own ethical ideology as it applies to teaching. Finally, we will look at centralization of academic integrity (cf. Neufeld & Dianda, 2007), and explore its parallels with issues around ethical dilemmas in teaching. With participant engagement, we will look at both sides of the debate around centralization of special academic consideration to further illustrate the inherent complexity of teaching with integrity. 

Neufeld, J., & Dianda, J. (2007). Academic dishonesty: A survey of policies and procedures at Ontario Universities. Council of Ontario Universities.

Forsyth, D. R. (1980). A taxonomy of ethical ideologies. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 39(1), 175-21.

Macfarlane, B. (2004). Teaching with integrity: The ethics of higher education practice. New York, NY: Routledge.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Cypress 1 Room

1:45pm

CON03.13 - Head, heart, hands and home: A meaningful way to support students navigate choice
Students are faced with increasing pressure to “do it all”; perform well academically, get involved, give back, get career-related experience, and have a variety of meaningful learning moments. With all these pressures the burden of choice falls to the student to select from an overwhelming array of on and off campus opportunities - but which opportunities are the “right” ones?

Head, Heart, Hands and Home is a reflection model and tool that advisors can use to support students as they begin to answer their own questions of “what should I do?”  This model can be used to help students; reflect on previous experiences, make decisions about the present and plan for the future.

The Head, Heart, Hands and Home model is derived from several bodies of literature; transformational education theory, student development theory, sustainability education literature and is informed by critical, place-based and aboriginal pedagogies.  This model embraces a holistic view of the student and supports them in identifying value and making meaning from their experiences.

This interactive session will bring this model to life through meaningful reflection and purposeful conversation.  There will be a short presentation that introduces the model and frames the context and challenge.  This will be followed by a live session where attendees are facilitated in groups to work through audience generated cases.  Attendees will get a chance to apply the tool in reflective conversation and leave confident in their ability to apply it in future conversations with students.

Astin, A. (1984) "A developmental theory for higher education" Journal of College Student Personnel, 25 [4], 297–308

Gruenewald, D. A. (2003). The best of both worlds: A critical pedagogy of place. Educational Researcher, 32(4), 3-12.

Mezirow, J. (1991) Transformative Dimensions of Adult Learning. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.

Sipos, Y. Battisti, B., & Grimm, K. (2008). Achieving transformative sustainability learning: engaging head, hands and heart, International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 9(1), 68-86.



Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Cypress 2 Room

3:00pm

CON04.13 - Dissonance or harmony? Reflections on alignment between students-as-partners principles and practices in post-secondary Institutions in Canada
How do faculty and students meaningfully engage in partnerships to improve teaching and learning? What structural and institutional mechanisms support this kind of engagement? How do power differences between faculty and students impact engagement, particularly for students? Within the context of these questions, we (one faculty, one graduate student, and one undergraduate) examine Canadian cases to incorporate the principles of students-as-partners in teaching, research and institutional practices. Informed by international literature on students-as-partners (see Cook-Sather, Bovill, and Felten, 2014; Healey, Flint, and Harrington, 2014; Werder and Otis, 2010) as well as critical and feminist pedagogy (Fraser, 2009; Freire, 2000) we seek to identify sites of harmony and sites of dissonance between students-as-partners principles and practices, to help teaching and learning become more responsive to the tensions inherent in efforts to adopt students-as-partners principles. Specifically, this session includes: 1) a brief introduction to the literature on students-as-partners, 2) examples of student-faculty partnership from our own institutional contexts, and 3) participant discussion (using a jigsaw) of examples of student-as-partners practices they have adopted or have seen adopted. Participants will be invited to identify sites of harmony (cases where participants believe the principles have been successfully applied in practice), sites of dissonance (cases where participants believe the principles have not been successfully applied in practice) and strategies for reducing dissonance. This session is of interest to faculty and students who are curious about engaging in partnership activities, educational developers who may be supporting partnership activities, and educational administrators involved in institutional change efforts.

Cook-Sather, A., Bovill, C., and Felten, P. (2014). Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Fraser, N. (2009). Scales of justice: Reimagining political space in a globalizing world. New York: Columbia University Press. 

Freire, P. (2000). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: The Continuum International Publishing Group Inc. 

Healey, M., Flint, A., and Harrington, K. (2014). Engagement through partnership: Students as partners in learning and teaching in higher education. York: HE Academy. 

Werder, C., and Otis, M. (2010). (Eds.) Engaging student voices in the study of teaching and learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Cypress 2 Room

4:00pm

POSTER.10 - A dietetics professional practice course transformed: Students as creators of knowledge
The project team redeveloped, evaluated and refined a pre-practicum professional practice course for the Dietetics program. Stakeholder feedback highlighted issues students experience transitioning to professional environments, which provided the impetus for the project. These issues included: low learning engagement and difficulty applying foundational knowledge during practicum. The pilot course incorporated self-directed learning approaches in order to increase learning engagement and knowledge recall during practicum. Research shows that active, self-directed learning builds self-efficacy, successful performance, and workplace leadership (Boyer et al., 2014). In the pilot course, student groups researched subjects surrounding preparation for practice with the support of professional advisors. Each group identified learning needs, researched this narrowed topic, and created educational content (including media for online sharing, and an interactive workshop for peers). Evaluation showed the pilot course supported student engagement and ownership of learning. Students reported their technological and networking skills improved, and they valued the student-led workshops. Michel et al. (2009) noted similar findings; students in active-learning environments were more participative, accountable, and able to retain knowledge. Students shared that the student-created-media was of greatest value during practicum preparation, when opportunities for exposure to experiential learning in practice settings were not yet available. These results show promise for applying similar pedagogical approaches in preparing for asynchronous learning in professional programs. The objectives of this facilitated poster session are: (1) to share experiences with a course re-design initiative and its effect on learning, and (2) to discuss with attendees strategies to address gaps between academic learning and professional practice. 

Boyer, S.L., Edmondson, D.R., Artis, A.B. and Fleming, D. (2014) Self-directed learning: a tool for lifelong learning. Journal of Marketing Education, 36, 20. doi: 10.1177/0273475313494010

Michel, N., Cater, J., & Varela, O. (2009). Active versus passive teaching styles: An empirical study of student learning outcomes. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 20(4), 397-418. doi: 10.1002/hrdq.20025



Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.11 - Building community, encouraging support: Three streams of student mentoring in University of British Columbia Sociology
Graduate students in the Department of Sociology at the University of British Columbia have been organizing the Sociology Student Mentorship Program since 2010. Approximately 36 students participate in the program annually. This poster provides a detailed overview of the three program streams: undergraduate mentoring, teaching assistant mentoring, and graduate student mentoring. This group of students is often overlooked within the mentorship literature focused on first year undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty (Countryman & Zinck, 2013; Goff, 2011; Le Cornu, 2005). The poster also includes information about the program goals, structure and events. Student photos and experiences are profiled. This facilitated poster session will enable participants to engage directly with the organizers of the peer-mentorship program to discuss experiences, challenges and best practices. By the end of the poster session, participants will be able to identify the key characteristics of each mentorship stream and will be able to articulate the ways in which the program supports mentoring partnerships throughout the term. Overall, our presentation can help establish best practices for the structure of academic peer mentorship programs in post-secondary institutions. 

References:

Countryman, J . & Zinck, A. (2013). Building connections in the first-year undergraduate experience. The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 4(2), 1-18.

Goff, L. (2011). Evaluating the outcomes of a peer-mentoring program for students transitioning to postsecondary education. The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 2(2), 1-13.

Le Cornu, R. (2005). Peer mentoring: Engaging pre-service teachers in mentoring one another. Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning, 13(3), 355-366.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.12 - Do we need to teach in harmony? Developing a food science concept inventory to measure learning effectiveness and fine-tune our teaching practices
The need of a common evaluation tool to assess student learning was identified in an introductory food science course. The course attracts a diverse audience in both science and arts discipline that have an interest in food. The challenge of student prior knowledge of food is compounded by increased enrollment and a course that operates with multi-sections and instructors using different teaching strategies. A concept inventory was developed to measure student knowledge and identify student misconceptions (Adam & Wieman, 2010). Concept inventory is a set of multiple-choice questions where the distractors (wrong answers) are purposely designed to represent commonly held misconceptions. It can be used to identify how many students in a class have mastered a concept and common misconceptions within the class (Garvin-Doxas et al. 2007). Concept Inventories have been developed for undergraduate biology (Kalas et al.,2013) and physics (Adams & Wieman, 2011) courses. This poster session presents the first concept inventory for food science education (FSCI). Common student misconceptions were identified by analysis of exam results (n=229) and a student survey using open ended questions (n=73 ) followed by two student focus groups. Eleven multiple choice questions were developed and tested in 4 sections (n=435) at the start and end of the course. Expert interviews (n=10) were used to evaluate the distractors and modifications to FSCI are reported. These results and their value in the assessment of teaching effectiveness are discussed. The food science topics introduced in this course are prerequisites to study within a food science curriculum. A subset of the questions could be used to test retention at start of senior level courses. How else can we use the FSCI? Teach to the concepts explicitly? Aim to improve the post-test results? How can we use post test results to improve teaching and eventually student learning? We look forward to hearing your candid feedback on these questions.

Adams WK, and Wieman CE. 2010. Development and validation of instruments to measure learning of expert-like thinking. Int J Sci Educ 33:1-24. DOI:10.1080/09500693.2010.512369

Garvin-Doxas K, Klymkowsky M, Elrod S. 2007. Building, using, and maximizing the impact of concept inventories in the biological sciences: report on a National Science Foundation sponsored conference on the construction of concept inventories in the biological sciences. CBE Life Sci Educ 6:277-282. doi: 10.1187/cbe.07-05-0031

Kalas P, O’Neill A, Pollock C, Birol G. 2013. Development of a meiosis concept inventory. CBE Life Sci Educ 12:655-664. doi: 10.1187/cbe.12-10-0174

Speakers
avatar for Judy Chan

Judy Chan

Education Consultant, Faculty Liaison, University of British Columbia
UBC


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.13 - Easing the shock: Improving first generation transfer student success in their transition to a 4-year institution
Community college transfer students are a rapidly growing subset of the student population at research institutions. In spite of their growing numbers, strategies to support their adjustment at the university level have largely been neglected. Difficulty with academic, social and psychological adjustment (Laanan, 2004) to the university take a toll on transfer students’ academic performance resulting in a GPA drop in the first year (termed “transfer shock”;Hills, 1965). This phenomenon is exacerbated for students in STEM majors, traditionally underrepresented minorities (URM) and first generation students. Transfer shock puts transfer students at a disadvantage in their future academic endeavors because their resulting graduation GPA may not be highly competitive. Most studies on the community college post-transfer experience have concentrated on understanding and measuring students' difficulty at the new institution, but little is known about the systematic implementation of interventions to facilitate the adjustment process and reduce the transfer shock.

We will present the preliminary results of a longitudinal randomized control study, which examines the effect of an intervention designed to reduce transfer shock for 67 URM and/or first generation STEM transfer students at a large four-year university. The intervention implemented a model that combines a two-week research intensive, seminars, and peer mentoring. The program is designed to improve academic motivation and identity, resulting in improvements in students’ academic achievement. We will present the findings on the impact of the program on students’ first and second quarter GPA, as well as academic/psychological adjustment measures.

Laanan, F. S. (2004). Studying transfer students: Part I: Instrument design and implications. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 28(4), 331-351.

Hills, John R. "Transfer shock: The academic performance of the junior college transfer." The Journal of Experimental Educational (1965): 201-215.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.14 - Two successful strategies for improving students’ academic writing and study skills in Australia
Many of the University of Newcastle (UoN), Australia’s students come from backgrounds including low SES, first-in-family and mature students, and they are underprepared to succeed at university study. UoN has recently implemented two strategies (one synchronous and one asynchronous) that provide academic writing and study skills to help these students achieve academic success. A student mentoring drop-in service utilising the skills of post-graduate students has been implemented to offer just-in-time assistance to students. Peer-supported writing programs available at other Australian rural university campuses were investigated (Dooley, Mc Niece & Martin, 2012; Williamson and Goldsmith, 2013) and the program initiated. The drop-in replaces individual consultations and structured workshops, and allows ‘just in time’ style support from post-graduate students in an open door fashion. A second support service, econsult, provides written feedback on a piece of writing by email. In 2010-11 we began exploring options for support that would best cater for students who were time poor, and juggling a variety of commitments that included study. As email usage is one of the most commonly held skills (Gray, et al, 2009) this was seen as the most effective method of making the service widely available. Any student can post their selected piece of writing and questions to the econsult address, and they are provided detailed personalised feedback within two days. This is especially helpful for students with multiple external commitments. Also, as most support offered is synchronous, it more closely aligns with the asynchronous nature of online and blended course delivery.

References:

Dooley, S., Mc Niece, A., & Martin, J. (2012, November). Undergraduate students as academic skills tutors: A transformative experience. Paper presented at Students Support Student Learning (SSSL) Symposium, Victoria University, Melbourne. Retrieved from http://www.aall.org.au/sites/default/files/SSSL%20Symposium%202012%20eBook_0.pdf

Gray, K., Kennedy, G., Waycott, J., Dalgarno, B., Bennett, S., Chang, R., Judd, t., Bishop, A., Maton, K. and Krause, K (2009). Educating the Net Generation – A Toolkit for Educators in Australian Universities – 2009. Support for the original work was provided by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council Ltd, an initiative of the Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. Retrieved from http://www.netgen.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/toolkit/NetGenToolkit.pdf

Williamson, F. & Goldsmith, R. (2013) PASSwrite: Recalibrating student academic literacies development. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice. 10(2). Retrieved from http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol10/iss2/r


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.44 - Learner-centered simulations for pre-graduate nursing students: Tuning into their clinical practice needs
Nursing students in our accelerated undergraduate program participate in structured simulations in all clinical courses throughout their two-year program of study. This poster will discuss the pilot use of impromptu student-driven simulations to prepare pre-graduation students for their final practicum. At least half of the class comes into consolidation following a community placement and experience anxiety related to their skill level and lack of recent practice in a hospital setting. The purpose of the pilot was to help students feel more confident about their upcoming placement by practicing self-identified skills and techniques in the context of a situation as close to reality as possible._x000D_
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Senior students were invited to sign up ahead of time, specify their learning needs (e.g. giving injections, focused health assessment, prioritizing, etc.), and identify their upcoming clinical placement (e.g. medicine, surgery, etc.). Student groups of six or less worked together in the lab for 2- 4 hours just prior to the start of their practicum. Two faculty members experienced in simulation learning led the scenarios and debriefing sessions. Little preliminary work was done on the simulations. Most scenario development was tailored to the students in the scenario and done on the fly. Pre-simulation briefing was very important to ensure “a psychologically safe context for learning” and active engagement of student learners who did not know each other very well (Rudolph, Raemer & Simon, 2014). Highlights of this learner-centered activity as well as feedback from both students and faculty involved will be shared in this poster._x000D_
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Onda, E.L. (2012). Situated cognition: Its relationship to simulation in nursing education. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 8, e273-e280._x000D_
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Rudolph, J.W., Raemer, D.B., & Simon, R. (2014). Establishing a safe container for learning in simulation: The role of the presimulation briefing. Simulation in Healthcare, 9(6), 339-349._x000D_
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Wooley, N.N. & Jarvis, Y. (2007). Situated cognition and cognitive apprenticeship: A model for teaching and learning clinical skils in a technologically rich and authentic learning environment. Nurse Education Today, 27, 73-79.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.45 - Development of an exit survey to evaluate undergraduate student learning experiences
All University departments are required to undertake internal and external review of their undergraduate programs. Self-assessment is a key component of this process, and student surveys are one commonly used metric of student satisfaction with their educational experiences._x000D_ Informed by historical student experience data from our department and newly conducted student focus group data, we developed an undergraduate student exit survey to evaluate student perspectives of their learning experiences. Our instrument used a combination of selected items from past departmental survey instruments, items from the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), and newly developed items to reflect departmental needs and local context. Our instrument was further refined through peer checking (review by colleagues) and pilot testing. We hope such a systematic approach to student experience survey development informs attendees’ practice at their own institutions._x000D_ Data collected from the survey will be used for internal and external review, and to guide and assess program improvement initiatives, current educational practice, and educational goals. In addition to the benefits to our own programs, we believe this survey contains many general questions about the students’ academic experiences, and would easily be applied to other programs. In relation to the programs offered by our department, we have identified through the survey a number of strengths, as well as opportunities to modify our educational practices. We believe we have developed a reliable instrument to track changes in student perceptions of their educational experiences in response to program modification over time.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer
 
Thursday, June 18
 

10:30am

CON05.02 - Students' perceptions of self-directed learning: Meaning, experiences, and value
Canadian post-secondary institutions aim to graduate critical thinkers, lifelong learners, and people who work well with others. But how do students develop these skills? Self-directed learning (SDL) is promoted as a process for developing student aptitude for lifelong independent and social learning (Brookfield, 2009). For instructors, students’ perceptions of their experiences with SDL provide critical input to informing the facilitation of this process (Raidal & Volet, 2009). This workshop presents findings from a course-based SoTL inquiry project designed to understand the experiences of 17 upper-level undergraduate students enrolled in a special topics SDL course using formal debate and seminar activities. Thematic analysis of a pre/post qualitative survey revealed students’ initially sensed uncertainty–yet satisfaction–in setting their own learning goals and charting their own learning paths. In moving through the SDL process, uncertainty transitioned into appreciating different ways of learning, which gave rise to an intrinsic sense of fulfillment in achieving their own learning goals. This workshop is organized into two parts: first, an overview of the project’s findings framed within the SDL literature, and second, participants sharing examples of their successes and challenges in facilitating SDL and discussing strategies to effectively prepare students for SDL. The intended outcome is to generate ideas for instructors to better design and support students through course-based SDL activities. This session will be of interest to faculty interested in using SDL in classrooms, educational developers who support instructors in using SDL, and educational administrators interested in learning more about the course-level application of SDL._x000D_
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Brookfield, S. (2009). Self-Directed Learning. In R. Maclean & D. N. Wilson (eds.), International Handbook of Education for the Changing World of Work: Bridging Academic and Vocational Learning (pp. 2615-2627). Bonn: Springer._x000D_
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Raidal, S. L., & Volet, S. E. (2009). Preclinical students’ predispositions towards social forms of instruction and self-directed learning: a challenge for the development of autonomous and collaborative learners. Higher Education, 57(5), 577–596.


Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am
Seymour Room

10:30am

CON05.10 - Bridging campus and community through flexible learning: Continuing professional education for Aboriginal learners
The Certificate in Aboriginal Health and Community Administration provides an excellent example of flexible learning and continuing professional development for Indigenous adult learners that links campus with community and workplace needs. Offered in partnership between the University of British Columbia Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Heath and University of British Columbia Continuing Studies, this blended-learning program draws approximately two-dozen learners annually from urban and rural settings who are interested in building administration skills in communication, leadership, human resources, information management, policy development and research, in order to strengthen the health and capacity of Indigenous communities. In this session, the certificate partners will use group discussion and case studies to highlight the design elements that facilitate the success of the program for this group of learners, noting how Indigenous approaches to teaching and learning are woven throughout the ten-month, blended-learning experience. They will explore the benefits of the online format (Kawalilak, Wells, Connell & Beamer, 2012) and how having Elders and instructors grounded in Indigenous andragogy leading the sessions and opening circles, ensures there is space for the learners to bring their whole selves to the experiential residential components.(Chase, Charnley & McLean, 2010) The presenters will outline how the program design supports participants to bring their extensive work experience to the courses, as they integrate and apply the new concepts to their home communities through the assignments. Case studies highlighting challenging moments in program implementation will also be shared for group discussion, analysis and consideration for those thinking of designing similar programs at their home institutions.

Chase, M, Charnley, K. & McLean, S. (2010). Recognizing Aboriginal oral tradition through blended learning: A success story. In F. Sudweeks, H. Hrachovec & C. Ess, (Eds). Proceedings Cultural Attitudes Towards Communication and Technology (pp.19-27). Murdoch, Australia: Murdoch University. 

Kawalilak, C., Wells, N., Connell, L. & Beamer, K. (2012). E-learning access, opportunities, and challenges for Aboriginal adult learners located in rural communities. College Quarterly, 15 (2).


Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am
Cypress 2 Room

11:30am

CON06.08 - Illuminating scholarship to students: The role of librarian-faculty course collaborations
Faculty-librarian collaborations can lead to effective assignments, in-class activities and resources that guide students towards better research and writing (Kuh, 2008). Bolan et al. (2014) identifying criteria for effective faculty-librarian collaboration, highlight that, for collaborative success, faculty and librarians should work together towards shared learning outcomes, ensuring that their learning activities tune students into the practice of scholarship. Information literacy, the set of skills needed to find, retrieve, analyze, and use information (Association of College and Research Libraries, 2015), is often the starting point for building an effective collaboration as it is a competency that both faculty and librarians have refined throughout their academic experiences (Bennett, O., & Gilbert, K., 2009; Brasley, 2008; Gunnarsson et al., 2014). Join us for an interactive session highlighting collaborative strategies such as designing homework for finding scholarly references, in-class discussions and assignments on avoiding plagiarism, copyright cleared readings linked on course websites, online resource guides for students, and in-class visits by librarians with examples that integrate research tools into students’ growing understanding of scholarship. Through individual, small and whole group activities, we will share our experiences and seek your examples, questions and comments. Let’s combine our experiences to improve literacy and scholarship amongst our students. You will leave the session with links to a web guide summarizing our collaborative philosophy, and our examples. We believe that when faculty, librarians and others work together, their shared passion for illuminating scholarship really translates the scholarly narrative into something visible, doable and beautiful.

Association of College and Research Libraries. (2015). Introduction to information literacy.http://www.ala.org/acrl/issues/infolit/overview/intro

Bennett, O., & Gilbert, K. (2009). Extending liaison collaboration: Partnering with faculty in support of a student learning community. Reference Services Review, 37(2), 131-142. doi:10.1108/00907320910957170

Brasley, S. S. (2008). Effective librarian and discipline faculty collaboration models for integrating information literacy into the fabric of an academic institution. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 2008(114), 71-88. doi:10.1002/tl.318

Bolan, J, P. Bellamy, J. Szurmak, R. Vine. (2014). A Partnership for Academic and Student Success: Educational Developers, Librarians and Lessons Learned University of Toronto. 2014 STLHE Conference.

Gunnarsson, J., Kulesza, W., and Pettersson, A. (2014). Teaching international students how to avoid plagiarism: Librarians and faculty in collaboration. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 40(3-4), 413-417.

Kuh, GD (2008). High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them and Why They Matter. AAC&U Publications.

Lead Speaker(s)
Speakers
avatar for Alice Cassidy

Alice Cassidy

Principal, In View Education and Professional Development
Alice Cassidy is an educational developer, science educator and wildlife biologist. She has designed, taught and coordinated courses at the University of British Columbia, and led large-scale educational programs. As a consultant, she leads workshops on teaching and learning. She... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Director Room

1:45pm

RTD.52 - Self-care in higher education: Finding balance and promoting mental well-being
Students in higher education experience unique stressors, including the rigours of academic life (assignment deadlines, tests, conducting research), financial pressures (educational costs as well as a variety of life expenses), navigating new social situations and relationships, and learning to live independently. High levels of stress are known to adversely effect academic performance as well as personal well-being. Myers, Sweeney, Popick, Wesley, Bordfeld and Fingerhut (2012) found a positive relationship between educating graduate psychology students about self-care practices and competency in managing stress levels. Napoli and Bonifas (2011) discussed strategies for creating an atmosphere of mindfulness in the classroom for social work students through participation in a mindfulness training program. After a comprehensive review of 136 graduate psychology programs, Bamonti, Keelan, Larson, Mentrikoski, Randall, Sly, Travers and McNeil (2014) urged programs to consider implementing a proactive and healthful focus, encouraging wellness. How can we as graduate students develop within ourselves and support one another in methods of self-care, and how can we support undergraduate students we work with as TAs in finding balance through self-care? As citizens of higher education communities, how do we foster an increase in the inherent value conferred upon self-care and mental well-being? In this 20 minute engaging, round-table discussion, participants will discover the benefits of self-care, explore what self-care might look like in their own life, and investigate the ways in which they can support undergraduate students in taking greater self-care.

Bamonti, P. M., Keelan, C. M., Larson, N., Mentrikoski, J. M, Randall, C. L., Sly, S. K., and McNeil, D. W. (2014). Promoting ethical behavior by cultivating a culture of self-care during graduate training: A call to action. Training And Education In Professional Psychology, 8(4), 253-260.

Myers, S. B., Sweeney, A. C., Popick, V., Wesley, K., Bordfeld, A., and Fingerhut, R. (2012). Self-care practices and perceived stress levels among psychology graduate students. Training And Education In Professional Psychology, 6(1), 55-66.

Napoli, M., and Bonifas, R. (2011). From Theory Toward Empathic Self-Care: Creating a Mindful Classroom for Social Work Students. Social Work Education: The International Journal, 30(6), 635-649.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Gardner

Nicole Gardner

Nicole Gardner
I am a graduate certificate student at UVic in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (LATHE) and a PhD student in Sustainable Education through Nipissing University in North Bay, Ontario. I have a Master's in Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies from UVic in Measurement... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Seymour Room

1:45pm

RTD.53 - Student as producer: Enhancing student learning through meaningful collaboration
The “student as producer” pedagogical model emphasizes the role of the student as collaborators in the production of knowledge (Neary & Winn, 2013). In this model, the university's approaches to learning and research are closer aligned; for example, students, similar to researchers, are asked to share their work beyond the walls of the classroom and not just with their immediate instructor or advisor (Bruff, 2013). This round-table session will examine how educators, through the embrace of open pedagogies, can support learners in their role as active participants in both their learning and their institution's intellectual output. It will explore case studies from multiple open courses, assignments, and projects at University of British Columbia and other institutions that asked learners to not only be students but also creators, authors, researchers, performers, instructors, scholars, designers, and problem solvers. The session will provide an in-depth discussion on the how choices around accessible curriculum, remixable content, and extendible technologies can impact student abilities to fully participate and engage as equals in their learning. It will also explore best practices for how institutions can establish sustainable frameworks that support emerging pedagogical practices, open education initiatives, and modern web trends, such as open badges, leading to authentic learning experiences that empower students. Participants will be encouraged to discuss and reflect on how the “student as producer” model can be applied at their their home institutions in order to support teaching practices where “the student is encouraged and supported in being not just a student-consumer but rather a productive, critical, digitally literate social individual” (Winn, 2011).

Bruff, D. (2013). Students as producers: An introduction. Retrieved from http://cft.vanderbilt.edu/2013/09/students-as-producers-an-introduction/

Neary, M. and Winn, J. (2009). The student as producer: Reinventing the student experience in higher education, in Neary, M, Stevenson, H and Bell, L (ed) The future of higher education: Pedagogy, policy and the student experience, pp 126-38, London: Continuum

Winn, J. (2011). Pedagogy, technology and student as producer. Retrieved from http://joss.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/2011/01/28/pedagogy-technology-and-student-as-producer/


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Seymour Room

3:00pm

CON07.02 - The leaking pipeline: Can empathy help to reduce attrition in STEM?
Seymour (1997) discusses how numerous studies have found that the apathetic environment found in STEM classrooms is the most frequently cited reason students leave. This chilly environment is typified by a feeling that faculty don't care about students and that students are not 'gifted' enough to be successful in these fields. Student confidence and motivation are critical issues that need to be addressed, and we believe we can make a difference. Tinto (2006) states that faculty engagement, especially in first year courses, is critical to enhancing student retention. We report on a web-based learning tool that allows students to work through a number of problem-based active learning activities that coincide with each week’s content. In our course, topics build upon each other, and it is important to identify and support students that fall behind early. To support student confidence, the tool provides a pressure-free environment to investigate the material, step-by-step hints, and support for further questions. Veletsianos (2014) reminds us that simply replacing the medium in which material is presented, without changing the underlying practices of instruction, will have little impact on learning. Our tool collects usage data, allowing us to revisit problems, and to answer all of the student’s questions areas before progressing onto new material. This helps to show we do care about their success. Through a preliminary qualitative assessment, we report on the impact our approach has had with respect to student confidence, metacognition, and the ability for an individual to envision success in computer science. 

Seymour, E., & Hewitt, N. M. (1997). Talking about leaving: Why undergraduates leave the sciences (Vol. 12). Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Tinto, V. (2006). Research and practice of student retention: what next?.Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice, 8(1), 1-19.

Veletsianos, G. (2014). The significance of educational technology history and research. eLearn, 2014(11), 1.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Bayshore Salon EF

4:30pm

CON09.08 - Seeing is doing: Modeling academic writing and research through instructional videos to support our English Language Learners (ELLs)
As universities in Canada admit unprecedented numbers of English Language Learners, teaching strategies must adapt. These often gifted students work hard to compensate for their still imperfect academic literacy skills, and universities want to support them without putting extra burden on busy instructors. One method to achieve harmony and promote academic writing in lower division courses is through implementing instructional videos. Koumi (2006) states that videos have the ability to model a process, offer a visual metaphor and provide vicarious experiences which motivate students. Many university courses focus on product rather than process which is a disadvantage to ELLs (Hinkel, 2004). Videos offer a combination of the visual plus audio which supports novice learners (Kalyuga, 2000). By posting videos on public sites such as YouTube, they are available 24/7 for multiple viewings. The value of designing instructional videos through narrative will be explored. When students identify with characters portrayed in a familiar story of arrival at university, they feel less stigma at needing extra help. They see people like themselves talking to friendly librarians, learning to do search steps and revising texts. This allows them to reflect on a more holistic vision of themselves and cast themselves in new identities (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000). Segments of two videos that the author has created will be shown for discussion, and participants will better understand the nature of teaching and supporting ELLs in higher education. This interactive presentation will appeal to academic instructors, administrators and advisors. Video links will be shared.

Clandinin, D. J. & Connelly, F.M. (2000). Narrative inquiry: Experience and story in qualitative research. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Hinkel, E. (2004). Teaching academic ESL writing: Practical techniques in vocabulary and grammar. Mahwah, NJ: L. Erlbaum Associates

Kalyuga, S. (2000). When using sound with a text or picture is not beneficial for learning. Australian Journal of Educational Technology, 16 (2): 161–72.

Koumi, J. (2006). Designing video and multimedia for open and flexible learning. NY: Routledge.


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Director Room
 
Friday, June 19
 

8:30am

CON10.13 - EAL writers as peer reviewers: Challenges and opportunities
It can be challenging to incorporate peer review in writing-curriculum design or renewal, especially with a significant English-as-additional-language (EAL) population. Students distrust peer review if they believe peers are weak writers, and EAL writers may not feel confident about their ability to provide “correct” feedback. In pre-professional programs such as business, peer review has not been widely adopted in writing courses (Rieber, 2010) even though students will need those skills in their working lives (Holst-Larkin, 2008). Proposing that peer review can enhance EAL students’ writing skills, professionalism, and confidence, we begin this session by describing why and how we incorporated peer review in three business-writing classes, each with a large EAL constituency. We then invite discussion to explore such questions as—How does peer review impact students’ revisions? Does peer review increase EAL students’ confidence in their feedback and writing? How do we help peers work through differences in language fluency? What value do students place on peer review? What do students and instructors learn? We conclude with a brief review of studies about the effects of peer-review on EAL writers (e.g. Choi, 2013; Vorobel & Kim, 2013), including early results from our research-in-process on this topic. Our experience will resonate with writing instructors and course developers considering or using peer review. Session participants will learn more about the challenges and opportunities of incorporating peer review, and will take away strategies to support EAL and non-EAL learners.

Choi, J. (2013). Does peer feedback affect L2 writers’ L2 learning, composition skills, metacognitive knowledge, and L2 writing anxiety? English Teaching, 68(3), 187-213.

Holst-Larkin, J. (2008). Actively learning about readers: Audience modelling in business writing. Business Communication Quarterly, 71(75), 75-80. doi:10.1177/1080569907312878

Rieber, L. J. (2010). Using peer review to improve student writing in business courses. Journal of Education for Business, 81(6), 322-326. doi:10.3200/JOEB.81.6.322-326

Vorobel, O. & Kim, D. (2013). Focusing on content: Discourse in L2 peer review groups. TESOL Journal, 5(4), 698-720. doi:10.1002/tesj.126



Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am
Cypress 2 Room

10:45am

CON12.03 - Online course design to facilitate transition from MOOC to fully-registered university student
We are currently running a totally online version of Introduction to Psychology I and II (PSYC1001, PSYC1002). The courses have tuition fees and normal admission standards and credit is granted for successful completion. The courses start and end like a typical semester but lectures and exams are conducted whenever the student desires. It is available to students globally who meet our university’s admission standards. We also run a non-credit (MOOC) version of the courses. The MOOC has no tuition fees nor admission standards or formal exams but is otherwise identical to the first courses. It enables people to “taste-test” PSYC1001 or PSYC1002 who are otherwise uncertain of their university readiness, or who may have insufficient time or money. Students may register in the MOOC at any time and proceed entirely at their own pace. A third version of PSYC1001 and PSYC1002 serves as a bridge from the MOOC to the for-credit version. If a student finds the material interesting or accessible to them, Flex Term allows them to capitalize on their learning and become a tuition-paying, for-credit student. Flex Term allows students to avoid the restrictions of due dates and deadlines associated with the typical semester structure. We will summarize the development of these courses, initial reactions and feedback, and discuss implications of this model. Participants will leave with first-hand experience of these courses and an understanding of the challenges and successes that flow from the intention to facilitate student transition from a MOOC to a tuition-bearing, for-credit university course.

Atenas, J. (2015). Model for democratization of the contents hosted in MOOCs. RUSC Universities and Knowledge Society Journal, 12(1). 3-14. Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v12i1.2031

Noll, J. (2015). Taking psychology online with quality, rigor, and engagement. Presentation at the National Institute for the Teaching of Psychology. St. Petersburg, FL.

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Lyons

Patrick Lyons

Director, Teaching and Learning, Carleton University
Patrick Lyons is the Director, Teaching and Learning in the Office of the Associate Vice-President Teaching and Learning at Carleton University. He is responsible for the leadership and direction for Carleton’s initiatives in blended and online learning, educational development... Read More →
avatar for Bruce H. Tsuji (Carleton University)

Bruce H. Tsuji (Carleton University)

Carleton University
Teaching psychology online, human-computer interaction


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am
Mackenzie Room

10:45am

CON12.09 - Developing collaborative teaching and learning initiatives in support of diversity and inclusive practices in higher education
The Teaching and Learning Framework at Memorial University emphasizes work that is engaging, supportive, inclusive, transformative, and outcomes-oriented for both educators and learners. The goal was to develop initiatives to respond to the specific needs of identified groups of non-traditional learners: 1) academically vulnerable first year students; 2) students with individual learning needs associated with disorders and/or mental health issues; 3) international students and those from non-western cultures. The challenges faced by non-traditional students have received considerable attention in the literature (Gardner & Holley, 2011; Offerman, 2011; Rendon, Jalomo, & Nora, 2000). Research has shown that non-traditional students have a higher rate of attrition than traditional students (Bean & Metzner, 1985). These students face the challenge of finding a balance between their academic and external commitments that allows for them to sustain a sufficient level of engagement. It has been found that the most important variables in the retention of non-traditional students are an increased use of learning support services and higher levels of perceived social integration (Gilardi & Guglielmetti, 2011). This presentation will act as a guide through the process of developing initiatives that embrace learner diversity and engage attendees in exploring methods of overcoming challenges. The focus of this session will be on effective practice, and will be of particular interest to university administrators and educators wishing to implement similar initiatives on their campuses. An overview of the research conducted to develop these initiatives will be followed by an open discussion where the sharing of research, initiatives, and best practices for the enhancement of teaching and learning is welcomed.

References:

Bean, J.P., & Metzner, B.S. (1985). A conceptual model of nontraditional undergraduate student attrition. Review of Educational Research, 55(4), 485-540. 

Gardner, S.K., & Holley, K. (2011). “Those invisible barriers are real”: The progression of first-generation students through doctoral education. Equity and Excellence in Education, 44, 77-92. 

Gilardi, S., & Guglielmetti, C. (2011). University life of non-traditional students: Engagement styles and impact on attrition. The Journal of Higher Education, 82(1), 33-53.

Offerman, M. (2011). Profile of the nontraditional doctoral degree student. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 129, 121-130. 

Rendon, L.I., Jalomo, R.E., & Nora, A. (2000). Theoretical considerations in the study of minority student retention in higher education. In J.M. Braxton (Ed.), Reworking the student departure puzzle (pp.127-156). Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press.


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am
Salon 2