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Achieving Harmony: Tuning into Practice

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Leadership in Teaching and Learning [clear filter]
Tuesday, June 16
 

9:00am

Capturing and learning from the experiences of tenure-track teaching faculty in Canada to develop a set of best practices
The Teaching Track is a type of faculty position that involves specializing in teaching and may or may not include a research mandate. These positions are being considered, debated, and implemented across Canada (e.g., Bradshaw, 2013; Chapnick, 2012) and therefore have the potential for creating division or harmony. The objective of this preconference day is to draw experiences from stakeholders from across different institutional contexts (e.g., current Teaching Track faculty, current University/College administrators) with the ultimate goal of creating a set of best practices that administrators, faculty associations, and others can use to create or strengthen an existing Tenure Track Teaching Stream.

First, we will invite a breadth of experiences and perspectives from participants centering on a few basic topics: what value the Teaching Track brings to individuals and to the institution, how Teaching Track positions differ across institutions, and what challenges people face in the Teaching Track. Next, we will use the results of the earlier discussion to collaboratively identify and imagine best practices institutions can use to successfully implement and foster the development of a Teaching Track. Participants will leave with a draft list of Ten Quick Tips for implementing a Tenure Track Teaching Stream they can bring to their institutions. To maximize the potential impact of this preconference, we will integrate results with data from an ongoing national survey led by the co-authors in a publication.

Speakers
avatar for Joanne Fox (University of British Columbia)

Joanne Fox (University of British Columbia)

Principal, Professor of Teaching, UBC Vantage College; Michael Smith Laboratories and Dept of Microbiology and Immunology
avatar for Catherine Rawn

Catherine Rawn

University of British Columbia


Tuesday June 16, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
Seymour Room
 
Wednesday, June 17
 

1:45pm

CON03.11 - Taking your teaching beyond your classroom: Teaching practice and educational leadership
Educational leadership includes extending the reach and impact of teaching beyond the classroom (The University of British Columbia, 2014). The objective of this panel is to offer examples of educational leadership to inspire reflection, dialogue and action (Cunningham & Cordeiro, 2006). In what ways can faculty, graduate students and instructional development staff extend their teaching practices beyond their current courses and classrooms through educational leadership (Carr, 2014)? Following an introduction to educational leadership as conceptualized at University of British Columbia, the panel will present examples of student-centered educational leadership initiatives undertaken by University of British Columbia faculty that produce significant impacts on student learning and teaching careers. The panel will support the conference theme “Achieving harmony: Tuning into practice” by providing examples of how teaching practice and educational leadership approaches can be combined to spark teaching collaboration among faculty and extend their teaching practices beyond their typical professional contexts. Panelists will highlight how students, teachers, and educational institutions can benefit from these forms of educational leadership. In this session, participants will:

• Explore the diverse experiences of teachers who have pursued educational leadership initiatives that extended their teaching practice across a wide range of interdisciplinary, institutional, and student learning environments;

• Share their own teaching practices with other session participants and collaboratively identify potential educational leadership opportunities to extend their teaching practices beyond their courses and classrooms;

• Identify and share with session participants one or more concrete examples of teaching initiatives that could make a significant impact on teaching and learning at their own institutions.


Carr, W. (2014). Teaching and learning beyond the classroom. Education Canada, 54(4), 24-27.

Cunningham, W. G., & Cordeiro, P. A. (2006). Educational leadership: A problem-based approach. Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.

The University of British Columbia. (2014). Guide to reappointment, promotion, and tenure procedures at University of British Columbia 2014/2015. Vancouver, B.C.: The University of British Columbia.

Speakers
avatar for Joanne Fox (University of British Columbia)

Joanne Fox (University of British Columbia)

Principal, Professor of Teaching, UBC Vantage College; Michael Smith Laboratories and Dept of Microbiology and Immunology
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching in Philosophy, Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology, The University of British Columbia
Philosophy, OER, open textbooks, open pedagogy
avatar for Catherine Rawn

Catherine Rawn

University of British Columbia



Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Salon 3

3:00pm

CON04.01 - 3M National Student Fellowship - Describing processes that nurture a culture of student educational leadership in post secondary institutions

This past year, I actively engaged in processes at my home university to encourage colleagues and students to get involved in the 3MNSF program: both as applicants and as professionals/practitioners who can finesse the institutional processes to make it possible for students to see themselves as potential candidates. Nurturing student leadership is not unique to the 3MNSF program. Chickering’s early work (1969) proposed guidelines, of a sort, for the environments and processes that contribute to leadership development in students. Kolb (1984) and, more recently, Komives, et al (2011) have also suggested ongoing considerations that make it more likely for students not only to see themselves as leaders, but also to seek out courses and learning /mentoring experiences that explicitly teach and value this aspect of learning in the post-secondary context. This session will describe the actions taken at one institution to nurture a culture of student educational leadership and invites participants to describe the processes that are enacted at their institutions. Small group description and discussion and large group consolidation of patterns and salient features will allow us to formulate suggestions applicable for colleagues ready to begin this process and colleagues ready to refine their existing processes.

Paolo Freire (1970) cautions that “it is not our role to speak to the people about our view of the world, nor to attempt to impose that view on them, but rather to dialogue with the people about their view and ours” (p. 96). This session hopes to enact this sentiment.


Chickering, A.W. (1969) Education and Identity. San Francisco: Jossey Bass

Freire, P. (1970) Pedagogy of the Oppressed. New York: Seabury Press

Kolb, D. (1984) Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of Learning and Development. Englewood Cliffs, N.J. Prentice Hall

Komives, S.R., Dugan, J.P., Owen, J.E., Slack, C., and Wagner, W. (Eds) (2011) The Handbook for Student Leadership Development. San Francisco: Jossey Bass



Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

3:00pm

CON04.05 - Sustained harmony: Building an institutional culture for the scholarship and practice of teaching and learning (SoTL)
Post-secondary institutions are placing growing emphasis on the importance of both the practice and scholarship of teaching and learning. Individuals and networks of practice (Roxå & Mårtensson, 2009; Roxå, Mårtensson, & Alveteg, 2011) across institutions are using SoTL’s cycle of systematic inquiry and dissemination to establish, implement, and investigate initiatives related to enriching the quality of our teaching and learning environments. In turn, engagement in the SoTL helps to establish a reciprocal culture of teaching and learning that is supported by SoTL, and a SoTL culture that is supported by a strong culture for teaching and learning. Recent research has focused on the importance of taking an integrated, multi-level approach to supporting the practice and scholarship of teaching and learning in post-secondary institutions (Williams et al., 2013). In this interactive session, participants will actively explore a multi-level framework for building a sustained culture for the scholarship and practice of teaching and learning, through both small group and large group discussion. The framework is based on a recent case study at the University of Guelph, which presents three catalysts for supporting engagement in the SoTL across multiple institutional levels: Leadership Commitment; Reward and Recognition; and Integrated Networks for Sustained Support (Kenny, Watson, & Desmarais, in press). By the end of this session, participants will be able to evaluate their own institutional context and use this framework to identify specific actions and opportunities for building and supporting a sustained culture for the scholarship and practice of teaching and learning. 

References:

Kenny, N., Watson, G. P. L., & Desmarais, S. (in press). Building sustained action: Supporting an institutional practice of SoTL at the University of Guelph. New Directions for Teaching and Learning. 

Roxå, T., & Mårtensson, K. (2009). Significant conversations and significant networks–exploring the backstage of the teaching arena. Studies in Higher Education, 34(5), 547-559. 

Roxå, T., Mårtensson, K., & Alveteg, M. (2011). Understanding and influencing teaching and learning cultures at university: a network approach. Higher Education, 62(1), 99-111. 

Williams, A. L., Verwoord, V., Beery, T. A., Dalton, H., McKinnon, J., Strickland, K., . . . Poole, G. (2013). The power of social networks: A model for weaving the scholarship of teaching and learning into institutional culture. Teaching and Learning Inquiry: The ISSOTL Journal, 1(2), 49-62.

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Kenny

Natasha Kenny

Natasha Kenny is Director of the Educational Development Unit in the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning at the University of Calgary
avatar for Gavan Watson

Gavan Watson

Associate Director, eLearning, Western University
Gavan P.L. Watson is the Associate Director, eLearning at Western University’s Teaching Support Centre and is the past chair of the Council of Ontario Educational Developers. With a PhD in environmental education, Gavan has a professional background in educational development and... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Seymour Room

3:00pm

CON04.10 - Coaching as a learning methodology in one University's Academic Leadership Development Program
While coaching is rapidly becoming a recognized, and evidence-based approach to learning and change (Stober and Grant, 2006; Nekoranec and Fourrier, 2013), and there is a large body of literature with respect to the development of skills in coaching practice (Blakey and Day, 2012; Britton, 2013), research on its efficacy in the higher education setting is just emerging. Given the conference theme of Achieving Harmony: Tuning into Practice, we note that coaching fosters learning (according to the principles of Ambrose, Bridges, and Lovett, 2010) that supports and sustains development, surfaces and explores complexity, gauges readiness for change, and helps reach action. The session explores the idea of bringing this value to our teaching, and to “student” learning in the context of developing educators. Participants will walk away with a preliminary understanding of: (i) how adapting a coaching methodology can accelerate learning, encourage greater accountability and an increased capacity to self-direct and self-correct, and enhance academic leadership development, and (ii) the flow of a coaching conversation in this context. The session will start with a brief introduction to the use of coaching as a learning methodology in a University’s Academic Leadership Development program, followed by a live coaching demonstration to help participants contextualize this work. After this, participants will engage in a peer coaching exercise and experience coaching and being coached. There will be an opportunity at the end to ask questions of the facilitators.

References:

Blakey, J., & Day, I. (2012). Challenging coaching: Going beyond traditional coaching to face the FACTS. London: Nicholas Brealey Publishing.

Britton, J. J. (2013). From one to many. best practices for team and group coaching. Ontario: John Wiley & Sons.\

Nekoranec, W., & Fourrier, D. (2013). Coaching managers through change. Training & Development, May, 26-29.

Stober, D. R., & Grant, A. M. (Eds.). (2006). Evidence based coaching handbook: Putting best practices to work for your clients. Hoboken N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Salon 2

3:00pm

CON04.11 - Addressing food insecurity through social innovation: improving the educational experience of physical and engineering science students through multi-disciplinary teamwork
Canadians waste ~40% of all food produced, while ~13% of Canadian households are food insecure (Gooch et al. 2010, Tarasuk et al. 2014). Given the many resources Canada has, there is a disconnect preventing every Canadian from having access to safe, nutritious, healthy food. To address these issues, students from multiple disciplines were brought together to develop solutions to reduce food insecurity and waste. Specifically, computer science students were tasked to work with community partners, local experts, and colleagues from disciplines spanning the physical and social sciences, to develop mobile and web-based apps to quantify and reduce food insecurity and waste. This talk explores the experiences of students, faculty, and partners over the course of a three year study of community-engaged scholarship within a third year computer science classroom. The talk will also provide observations from extracurricular events (e.g. hackathons) run parallel to the classroom. _x000D_
To capture student experience, attendees will be placed in multidisciplinary teams, and tasked with developing a prototype app that will quantify or reduce food insecurity or waste. Attendees will explore solution creation and refinement by understanding and integrating discipline specific knowledge, while also addressing community partners needs, and the intended users of their app. Attendees will learn the importance of communication, understanding and working with experts from multiple domains, and understanding the target audience of social innovation. Attendees will learn of the benefits of a community-engaged physical and engineering science classrooms, and of multidisciplinary student teams.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Salon 3

4:00pm

POSTER.06 - 3M National Teaching Fellowship Program: Impact study
As part of a three year study we have collected and analyzed data regarding the impact of the 3M National Teaching Fellowship through focus groups, a national survey, and the collection of archival material. Throughout our study, we maintain a focus on how this award has evolved over time, the impact on the individual, institution, the STLHE community at large, and the broader Canadian context. In our poster we will highlight findings from our national survey that targets 3M Fellows, educational developers, faculty, students, and administrators. We share a preliminary assessment of how the 3M national teaching fellowship program makes a difference to Canadian higher education. Do award-winning teachers in departments and across institutions continue to make significant contributions to learning and teaching after receiving the award? What impact have the almo st 300 3M National Teaching Fellows had, if any, on Canadian higher education? And how would one know? Although focused on the 3M National Teaching Fellowship, this poster explores how successful programs might go about measuring their impact.

Ahmad, A., Stockley, D, & Moore, R. (2013). 3M fellows making a mark in Canadian higher education. In D. Salter (Ed), Cases on quality teaching practices in higher education (pp. 182-190).

Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Brawer, J., Steinert, Y., St-Cyr, J., Watters, K., & Wood-Dauphinee, S. (2006). The significance and impact of a faculty teaching award: Disparate perceptions of department chairs and award recipients. Medical Teacher, 28 (7), 614–617.

Lead Speaker(s)
Speakers
avatar for Arshad Ahmad

Arshad Ahmad

Associate Vice-President, Teaching and Learning & Director, MIIETL, McMaster University
Dr. Arshad Ahmad is the Associate Vice-President Teaching and Learning and Director of Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL) at McMaster University. He is the Past Coordinator of the 3MNTF program and a 3M National Teaching Fellow. He is the Past... Read More →
RS

Ron Smith

Concordia Univeristy
Dr. Ron Smith is a Professor Emeritus, Education Department Concordia University and a 3M National Teaching Fellow. He is the Past-Chair of the 3M Council and has served on the adjudication for the 3M.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.08 - Competency based strategies to support faculty development
The urgent call to transform and reform educational practices rings loud across higher educational landscapes, nationally and internationally (Cohen & Kisker, 2010; Hutchings, Huber, & Ciccone, 2011). According to higher education leaders, a major paradigm shift is needed in the way educators view student learning and evaluation (Bass, 2012; Bain, 2004). To assist faculty at a multisite, multi-program nursing college to successfully transform their teaching practices, a structured faculty development program was implemented to promote the effective use of evidence-based learner-centered strategies. This presentation will examine a new faculty development model to promote the effective use of evidence-based pedagogies to optimize student learning. The framework of the faculty development program includes: (a) the formation of a culture that supports and recognizes scholarly teaching, (b) the formation of an organizational infrastructure that facilitates the successful implementation of the faculty development program across a multi-campus, multistate, undergraduate nursing college, and (c) the use of evidence-based pedagogical strategies to ensure positive student learning experiences and achievement of learning outcomes. This new faculty development model guides, develops, and evaluates the pedagogical knowledge base and learner-centered strategies educators need to optimize student learning. The learner-centered strategies were added to the end of course survey which evaluates faculty. Evaluation of the model includes end of course student survey results and grade distribution over a two year period. 

Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bass, R. (2012). Disrupting ourselves: The problem of learning in higher education. Educause Review, March/April, 2012. 

Cohen, A.M. & Kisker, C.B . (2010). The shaping of American higher education: Emergence and growth of the contemporary system. (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Hutchings, P., Huber, M.T., & Ciccone, A. (2011). The scholarship of teaching and learning reconsidered: Institutional integration and impact. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm

POSTER.09 - A mentoring model: Support structures and resources for community building
Mentoring is an integral aspect of both personal and professional development. Through our research, we are inquiring into the various resources, strategies, theories and frameworks that support effective mentoring relationships at the post-secondary level. Research has identified mentoring as one of the key methods in assisting teachers in their professional growth since it provides mentees with practical support that helps them gain self-confidence, solve problems and apply critical thinking skills to situations affecting student learning (Crow 2007,Hubball et al. 2010). This poster presentation provides an example of an investigation of mentors working with in service K-12 teachers providing small group and one-on-one support, resources, theory, and feedback to support the critical examination and assessment of teaching practice. In this model, mentors engage in relationship building and co-construct a community of practice, collaborating with teachers as they participate in three inquiry-based field studies and a portfolio of their learning. To support mentors, we are developing a shared resource ‘bank’ that can be accessed by mentors and program staff to support teacher learning and encourage leadership. Paraphrasing and questioning prompts, community building activities, and generational and learning style tools are examples of these resources. This poster will provide details of the Mentor/Mentee relationship and the tools included in the resource bank. A QRC will be included for access to resources that others can use to support a mentoring model in their own context.

Crow, G.M., 2007. The professional and organizational socialization of new English head-teachers in school reform contexts. Educational management, administration & leadership, 35 (1), 51–71.

Hubball, H., Clarke, A., and Poole, G., 2010. Ten-year reflections on mentoring SoTL research in a research-intensive university. International Journal for Academic Development, 15 (2), 117–129.

Speakers

Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bayshore Foyer
 
Thursday, June 18
 

11:30am

CON06.01 - Wellness and self-care for teachers: Practical solutions, and a call for change
This interactive workshop will focus on practices of self-care, wellness and balance for teachers in higher education. Autonomy with the promise of pursuing research and teaching in a collegial atmosphere are the ultimate pay off for becoming a professor. No wonder Susan Adams in a 2013 Forbes article named “university professor” as one of the least stressful jobs! In reality, stress, fatigue and burnout are not uncommon among post-secondary teachers who face pressing multiple demands from their personal and professional lives while dealing with swiftly changing institutions. These are the not-so-secret but seldom publicly acknowledged results of a work ethic focused on achievement against all odds and with a ‘do whatever it takes even if it ruins you’ attitude. These habits are often formed as students and are linked to achievement and recognition in young scholars. However, they may in fact set the stage for discord, lack of productivity and dissatisfaction by mid or later career. This workshop will discuss recent literature on wellness and focus on sharing practical strategies and solutions aimed at enhancing individual teacher self-care. We will also discuss our collective responsibility to change teaching culture to foster wellness as a core principle at an institutional level.

Sources:

Adams, Susan. (2013). The Least Stressful Jobs of 2013. Forbes, January 3, 2013. http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2013/01/03/the-least-stressful-jobs-of-2013/ Accessed January 9, 2015.

Hubball, H., & West, D. (2008). Faculty wellness strategies: Critical foundations for the scholarship of teaching and learning. Transformative Dialogues, Teaching & Learning Journal, 2(1), 1-11, Article 2.

Kabat-Zinn, Jon. Full Catastrophe Living (Revised Edition): Using the Wisdom of the Your Body and Mind to Face Stress, Pain, and Illness. New York: Bantam, 2013.


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Bayshore Salon ABC

11:30am

CON06.05 - Creating SoTL concertos for institutional impact
Scholarship of teaching and learning can have a positive impact on educational quality at various levels such as institutional, disciplinary, and national (Poole, Taylor, & Thompson, 2007) but little work has assessed this impact, particularly at the institutional level (Poole & Simmons, 2013; Wuetherick & Yu, 2013). The purpose of the session is therefore to build on our 2014 presentation of work in progress to discuss: How can post-secondary institutions in Canada create a crescendo in Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) programs and practices such that they impact institutional pedagogical climates? We (authors for an upcoming special issue of New Directions in Teaching and Learning) will offer several institutional case studies as variations on a theme to provide examples and evidence of the potential impact of SoTL initiatives. A concerto is a piece for solo instrument and orchestra. Taking these case studies as solo lines, your role as workshop participants will be as the orchestra. In small and large groups you will draw parallels and explore distinctions in the case studies, outline challenges, and suggest recommendations for synthesized models. Your role in the concerto is to consider the merits of various practices, approaches to assessing impact, and make suggestions for resolving continuing challenges with this work such that you can implement successful practices at your own institution. 

References:

Poole, G., & Simmons, N. (2013). The contributions of the scholarship of teaching and learning to quality enhancement in Canada. In G. Gordon, & R. Land (Eds.), Quality enhancement in higher education: International perspectives. London: Routledge.

Poole, G., Taylor, L., & Thompson, J. (2007). Using the scholarship of teaching and learning at disciplinary, national and institutional levels to strategically improve the quality of post-secondary education. International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 1(2). 

Wuetherick, B., & Yu, S. (2013). The Canadian teaching commons: Exploring the state of SoTL in Canadian higher education. Presented at the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning annual conference, Raleigh, October 3-5.

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Kenny

Natasha Kenny

Natasha Kenny is Director of the Educational Development Unit in the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning at the University of Calgary
avatar for Elizabeth Marquis

Elizabeth Marquis

McMaster University
Beth Marquis is an Assistant Professor in the Arts & Science Program and the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL).
avatar for Roselynn Verwoord

Roselynn Verwoord

University of Victoria
avatar for Gavan Watson

Gavan Watson

Associate Director, eLearning, Western University
Gavan P.L. Watson is the Associate Director, eLearning at Western University’s Teaching Support Centre and is the past chair of the Council of Ontario Educational Developers. With a PhD in environmental education, Gavan has a professional background in educational development and... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Seymour Room

11:30am

CON06.07 - Reaching the high notes: Evidencing your leadership in learning and teaching
In this interactive session we will consider the nature of academic leadership and evidencing the impact of academic leaders. In the UK, fellowship of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) is increasingly being seen as a benchmark of faculty and institutional credibility and professionalism and a focus on the student learning experience. Fellowships are available in four categories and, to achieve Senior and Principal Fellowship, applicants are required to evidence their academic leadership and their impact and influence on students, colleagues and the sector more broadly. Professor Cryan, Vice Chancellor of the University of Huddersfield where 100% of faculty have achieved fellowship, has stated that all staff had benefited from the process ‘which had translated into better teaching and improved academic performance by students’ (Cryan 2014). This session – co-presented by academic developers from the UK and Canada – will provide an opportunity for participants to consider the relevance of a sector-wide national framework for benchmarking professionalism in the leadership of learning and teaching such as the UK Professional Standards Framework (HEA 2011). Discussion will be prompted by short video sequences filmed with academics in the UK who have successfully gained recognition for their achievements and their academic leadership discussing the benefits that the process recognition has brought. Participants will debate the implications of professional recognition in the higher education sector in Canada and elsewhere. We will also consider how such a recognition framework could operate and, through it, how best to evidence achievements in teaching and supporting learning and in academic leadership.

References:

Cryan, B. (2014, March 5) Students in dark on teaching credentials. Times Higher No 2.141.

Higher Education Academy (2011) UK Professional Standards Framework. Retrieved from: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/professional-recognition/uk-professional-standards-framework-ukpsf

Speakers
avatar for Celia Popovic

Celia Popovic

Director Teaching Commons, York University
Susan Vail, associate vice-president teaching and learning at York University, has announced that Celia Popovic has been appointed to the position of director of York University’s Teaching Commons.“I am so pleased that Dr. Popovic will now have the opportunity to share her pedagogical... Read More →



Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Chairman Room

11:30am

CON06.10 - Teaching and/or leadership? Leadership and/or teaching? Common threads, Common purpose?
Depending on how you conceive of leadership (leader as guide, etc.) and how you conceive of teaching (teacher as guide, etc.), you could be forgiven for using the labels interchangeably – they seem to share overlapping skill sets. What are seen as the best practices in some types of leadership (e.g., servant leadership, Spears, 2010) might inform our teaching practices and what are seen as best teaching practices (Samples & Copeland, 2013) might inform us as leaders. Yet, while many committed teachers shy away from taking on explicit leadership roles, often citing workload and stress concerns, Parker Palmer (2000, p.74) reminds us that “”Leadership” is a concept we often resist. …. But if it is true that we are made for community, then leadership is everyone’s vocation, and it can be an evasion to insist that it is not”. During this guided discussion, which will include a variety of solo, partner and small group activities, we will explore how these conceptions of teaching and leadership might encourage us to consider accepting more explicit leadership opportunities, to refine our decision making about what leadership opportunities we want to nurture or decline, and/or to expand our conceptualization of what might constitute leadership within the diverse landscape of academic culture. By the end of the discussion, participants will have better questions to consider when making decisions about their potential contributions to collegial leadership in their departments, institutions, or disciplines.

Palmer, P. J. (2000). Let your life speak: Listening for the voice of vocation. San Francisco, CA: Wiley & Sons.

Samples, J. W., & Copeland, S. E. (2013). The universality of good teaching: A study of descriptors across disciplines. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 25(2), 176-188.

Spears, L. C. (2010). Character and servant leadership: Ten characteristics of effective, caring leaders. The Journal of Virtues & Leadership, 1, 25-30.


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Salon 2

1:45pm

RTD.43 - Teaching and learning councils: Engaging faculty in changing institutional teaching practices
Post-secondary institutions aim to provide high-quality education through a commitment to student success, community engagement and associated scholarship. Individual faculty members’ primary role in creating quality educational experiences is traditionally accomplished through their individual teaching and committee activities. Although faculty members can play a critical role in producing a harmonious institutional approach to defining and operationalizing quality post-secondary education (Fullan, 2007), they rarely have opportunities to do so. One such opportunity can be created through an institutional teaching and learning council, which provides an innovative way for faculty to work with colleagues beyond their own Faculty, advance teaching practice, support student success across the university and create and implement original educational initiatives (Katz, Earl, & Jafaar, 2009). This session reports on experiences in two Canadian universities who have recently established teaching and learning councils to help advance a culture of scholarly teaching and empower faculty members to affect institutional change in teaching practices (Warhust, 2006). Through a roundtable discussion, the processes used in these two institutions will be summarized and participants will share their own experiences in engaging faculty at the institutional level. By the end of the session, participants should be able to identify effective structures and processes for facilitating institutional level faculty engagement in enhancing teaching and learning and overcoming challenges to such participation.

Fullan, M. (2007). The new meaning of educational change. New York, NY: Teachers College Press. 

Katz, S., Earl, L. & Ben Jaafar, S. (2009). Building and connecting learning communities: The power of networks for school improvement. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Warhurst, R. P. (2006). “We Really Felt Part of Something”: Participatory learning among peers within a university teaching-development community of practice. International Journal of Academic Development, 11(2), 111 – 122. doi: 10.1080/13601440600924462

Speakers
avatar for Liesel Knaack

Liesel Knaack

Director, Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning, Vancouver Island University
Liesel is the director of the Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning at VIU. The centre supports faculty and students with learning technologies, pedagogical design, online learning and scholarly teaching and learning. Liesel was formerly a K-12 teacher and Associate Professor... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Mackenzie Room

1:45pm

RTD.44 - An investigation of transformational and transactional leadership used by professors and its impact on student learning and engagement
Today’s students are evolving and consequently require teaching methods that incorporate a more situational-sensing leadership approach. This exploratory paper brings together two relevant bodies of literature: transactional and transformational leadership (Judge & Piccolo, 2004) and specific learning styles/approaches within teaching and learning research. The paper addresses the learning styles of an accommodator, diverger, converger and assimilator (Kolb, 1984); as well as surface and deep approaches to learning (Caudill, Murphy & Young, 2008). When professors attempt to best match their leadership approaches to student learning styles, and to develop more “tuned in” ways of delivering lectures, engagement can be enhanced. Students can observe professors developing effective situational sensing leadership and teaching methods. Professors’ use of transformational leadership approaches can inspire and motivate students to participate, while at the same time utilization of transactional leadership can provide students with contingent rewards to increase engagement. A primary survey was administered to a sample population of undergraduate Business students, consisting of qualitative questions on teaching and learning. Findings emphasize the necessity of fostering better techniques for professor-student relations; elements of the most productive learning environments for students; and the importance of relating theory to real world examples in order to increase student participation. Findings also reveal the necessity for professors to have a mindset of adapting leadership and teaching methods in order to close the current learning gaps. Lastly, the paper concludes with discussions on specific feedback from students on how professors can “tune into practice” to effectively increase professor-student engagement and cohesiveness.

Caudill, Eve M., J. William Murphy and Mark R. Young. (2008). Evaluating Experiential Learning Activities. Journal for Advancement of Marketing Education, Vol. 13: 28-33, 36, 38.

Judge, T.A., & Piccolo, R.F. (2004). Transformational and Transactional Leadership: A meta-analytic test of their relative validity. Journal of Applied Psychology, 89, 755-768.

Kolb, D.A. (1984). Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall Inc.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Mackenzie Room

1:45pm

RTD.45 - Building a community of practice for teaching-track faculty
Teaching is a creative process that often occurs in isolation, in the context of one’s own classes. People whose careers are centred squarely on teaching (e.g., sessional instructors, tenure-track teaching faculty) may risk isolation. To address this issue, the University of British Columbia Instructor Network was formed in 2009 to cultivate professional development and collegiality among teaching-track faculty at the University of British Columbia (see The University of British Columbia, 2014). The Instructor Network is exclusive to tenure-track teaching faculty, providing identity and connection to faculty in this relatively rare and sometimes misunderstood position. In 2009, we struck a Steering Committee for the Instructor Network. In its first year, the Steering Committee created a comprehensive cross-faculty listserv and website. Since then, the Steering Committee has organized an annual series of events for Network members. Given increased recognition and influence of the Network, the Steering Committee recently organized a “re-visioning session” to obtain feedback from Network members regarding the goals and future of the Instructor Network. We will begin this Roundtable Discussion by briefly sharing the current mandate and structure of the Instructor Network and the results of the re-visioning session. Following from the interests of the group, the ensuing conversation may focus on the importance of community among teaching-track faculty, and/or the challenges and opportunities associated with establishing a grass-roots community of practice (Wenger, 1998). Participants in this Roundtable Discussion will leave with ideas and strategies to develop a community of teaching practitioners at their own institutions.

The University of British Columbia. (2014). Guide to Reappointment, Promotion, and Tenure Procedures at University of British Columbia 2014/2015. Vancouver, B.C.: The University of British Columbia. 

Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice: Learning, meaning and identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Mackenzie Room

1:45pm

RTD.46 - Creating opportunities for international collaboration and dialogue: A joint program for Canadian and Japanese university education managers and developers
In order to foster understanding, share experiences and resources, and to develop meaningful and sustainable collaborative partnerships an educational developers and manager program was developed between partner institutions in Canada and Japan. This initiative was part of the Educational Management and Leadership program in Japan which cultivated leaders or change agents that can drive educational improvement and reform at individual universities. It provided participants with the opportunity to build or improve expertise, skills and capabilities for designing, enabling and managing educational improvements at institutional level as well as promoting good teaching at the individual level. Groups of Japanese academic leaders participated in a week-long intensive program at a Canadian university which included a series of workshops focused on aspect of educational development and leadership, individual consultations and meeting with relevant Canadian stakeholders designed to support the participants in developing their own project or initiative. The purpose of this session is to describe the program that was developed in partnership with a Canadian Centre for Teaching and Learning and a Japanese University Center for the Advancement of Higher Education and to consider the rationales and benefits for internationalization (Knight, 2008, Chap.11) in educational development for the host Canadian institution and the selected Japanese participants and their institutions. This session will highlight the opportunities that exist for institutions in Japan and Canada to collaborate. Participant will learn about this program, but also discuss the similarities, differences, challenges and opportunities for collaboration that can be developed with other international institutions of Higher Education. 

Knight, J. (2008) Higher Education in Turmoil, The Changing World of Internationalization, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Mackenzie Room

1:45pm

RTD.48 - Lessons learned: A discussion of a TA training program for graduate students
In the intense job market of higher education today, the importance providing graduate students with adequate opportunities for engaging in the practice of teaching is becoming increasingly apparent. (Nyquist, 1991; Pannapacker, 2012) At the same time, many departments often find it extremely difficult to create change in the face of a diversity of opinions and the inertia of long-sustained traditions.(Carlson, 2013) Based on our experience creating a new TA training program, and also a recent study by Jennifer S. Boman, we will lead a roundtable discussion of how TA training programs can create substantive change in the learning experiences of teaching assistants.(Boman, 2013) Topics we hope to touch on include financial and logistical challenges, partnerships with outside experts, and introducing students to the fundamentals of teaching theory and practice within the unique context of the courses offered by one’s department. Finally, we hope to discuss ways to encourage professional development without taking time away from more traditional scholarly and academic pursuits. 

References:

Boman, J. S. (2013). Graduate Student Teaching Development: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Training in Relation to Graduate Student Characteristics. The Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 43(1), 100–114.

Carlson, A. D. (2013, November 6). Hard Lessons From the Front Lines of Change. The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Nyquist, J. D. (Ed.). (1991). Preparing the professoriate of tomorrow to teach: selected readings in TA training. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Pub. Co.

Pannapacker, W. (2012). Should Students Be Encouraged to Pursue Graduate Education in the Humanities? Journal of Markets and Morality, 15(2), 445–53.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Mackenzie Room

1:45pm

RTD.49 - Does it blend? Preparing to teach a blended course: Lessons learned in helping instructors transform a course
The research is clear that teaching a blended course produces enhanced learning outcomes for students. (U.S. Department of Education, 2010). However successfully teaching a blended course requires instructors to adopt a new approach to teaching, learn new skills, and to rethink their course design. This is a time-consuming and intellectually-challenging task for instructors who are already carrying a full teaching and research load. How can a university motivate and support instructors to explore teaching in a blended learning environment and help them (re)design their course to incorporate active learning (Freeman, S., 2014, 8410-8415) (.Wieman, C. E. 2014, 8319–8320) in both the online and face-to-face contexts for an enhanced learning experience? At University of British Columbia, we have developed a cohort-based blended course on blended course design (T-BLE). This roundtable discussion will summarize lessons learned about designing and delivering three successful iterations of a blended course to prepare instructors to design and deliver their own blended courses. It will also include the voices of T-BLE participants who will provide feedback from their perspectives both as students in T-BLE and as instructors designing their blended courses. Working collaboratively, participants will:

- identify challenges and potential solutions when implementing blended learning in their (specific) contexts
- explore avenues to introduce instructors to the pedagogy of blended teaching and learning
- consider administrative, design and teaching strategies for motivating and supporting instructors as they move to a blended learning environment.

References:
1 U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning: A Meta-Analysis and Review of Online Learning Studies, Washington, D.C., 2010.

2. Freeman, S., Eddy, S. L., McDonough, M., Smith, M. K., Okoroafor, N., Jordt, H., & Wenderoth, M. P. (2014). Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(23), 8410–8415. http://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1319030111

3 Wieman, C. E. (2014). Large-scale comparison of science teaching methods sends clear message. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(23), 8319–8320. http://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1407304111


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Mackenzie Room

1:45pm

RTD.55 - How to do educational leadership for student learning? Preliminary findings from a staff training programme in educational leadership
At Roskilde University we have developed a staff training programme in educational leadership. The objectives are three-fold. A. to qualify the educational leaders in leadership; B. to create a good and strong framework around the institution's study programmes (degrees) and C. to prepare the leaders to actively work with staff motivation and quality enhancement of teaching for student learning. The programme provides the participants with both knowledge about learning and teaching, and with a forum for peer reflection and sharing of experiences of how best to navigate the known and unknown waters between many stakeholders and to navigate between regulations and opportunities, management and vision. An important goal of the programme is to facilitate the building of communities of practice (Wenger, 1998 & 2000) by sharing knowledge and engaging the participants in reflexive and innovative dialogues about their practice as leaders. The great challenge for the Heads of Studies is to motivate and manage the teachers, who are also researchers, as well as providing opportunities for developing contiguous teaching activities that lead to deep learning (Gibbs et.al, 2008). In the roundtable we will discuss how to develop educational leadership for improved student learning outcome – what is needed?


Gibbs G., Knapper C. & Piccinin, S. (2008), Disciplinary and Contextually Appropriate Approaches to Leadership of Teaching in Research-Intensive Academic Departments in Higher Education in Higher Education Quarterly, vol. 62, no. 4, Oct 2008, pp 416-436

Wenger, E. (2000) Communities of Practice and Social Learning Systems Organization May 2000 vol. 7 (2), pp 225-24

Wenger, E. (1998), Communities of practice: learning, meaning, and identity, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press

Lead Speaker(s)
avatar for Sidsel Winther (Roskilde University)

Sidsel Winther (Roskilde University)

Denmark, Roskilde, Roskilde University

Speakers

Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Seymour Room

3:00pm

CON07.12 - Faculty perceptions of the impact of professional development: Interculturalizing the curriculum
A variety of demographic shifts has resulted in increased cultural diversity in our classrooms leaving many educators challenged to deliver course content the ways they may have previously. This presentation will outline a research inquiry into the impacts of an intensive professional development program: Interculturalizing the Curriculum. In this session the presenters will outline the program features and share the findings of their mixed methods study. The Interculturalizing Curriculum has been delivered to 4 interdisciplinary cohorts between 2008 and 2013, with a total of 60 faculty participants. The program consists of several days of professional development based in intercultural and pedagogical theory in order to support individual faculty to make shifts to their curriculum and delivery. The aim of the program is to provide faculty with intercultural and indigenous frameworks and pedagogical strategies that may enhance both their ability to work with culturally diverse learners and to incorporate intercultural and global learning outcomes in their coursework. The purpose of this research project was to gain an understanding of faculty perceptions of the impact of the program to them personally, professional, and to their learners. Close to 40% of past participants consented to be part of the research. We used a mixed methods approach to data gathering: a likert scale online questionnaire, peer video interviews, and individual interviews. The findings are promising and contribute to the field of professional development in education. 

Deardorff, D. K. (2011). Assessing intercultural competence. New Directions for Institutional Research, (149), 65-79. 

Kuokkanen, R. (2007). Reshaping the university: Responsibility, indigenous epistemes, and the logic of the gift. Vancouver, BC: University of British Columbia Press. 

Lee, A., Poch, R., Shaw, M.,& Williams, R. (2012). Engaging diversity in undergraduate classrooms: A pedagogy for developing intercultural competence. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 38, Number 2.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Cypress 2 Room

4:30pm

CON09.12 - Going the distance to promote excellence in teaching: Tracking the effectiveness of a reciprocal peer observation approach in higher education
In this session, participants will learn about the development of a peer observation of teaching initiative at the University of Windsor. In addition, attendees will also find out about a novel mapping software that provides an opportunity to “see” the impact of teaching and learning initiatives instituted on university campuses. Peer observation of teaching has been shown to helps educators develop new skills (Chester, 2012), learn about personal strengths and weakness (Koc, 2011), and affirm self-efficacy (Hendry & Oliver, 2012). Our peer collaboration network was designed to stimulate professional and pedagogical growth, enable instructors to give and receive feedback and share experiences and ideas with colleagues to improve teaching and learning. The effectiveness of the network will be discussed in two ways. First, qualitative feedback from network participants will be presented as it relates to several consistently reported themes. Secondly, network expansion and development will be highlighted using scaled visual maps which depict the extent of the collaboration among peer observers and observees, academic units, and faculties within the network. Through the novel application of mapping software, network expansion and development can be monitored and quantified in terms of the number of connections made between participants, as well as between and within units on campus. The application of this mapping approach to other educational development initiatives will be discussed.

Chester, A. (2012). Peer partnerships in teaching: Evaluation of a voluntary model of professional development in tertiary education. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 12(2), 94-108.

Hendry, G. D., & Oliver, G. R. (2012). Seeing is believing: The benefits of peer observation. Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, 9(1), 11

Koc, C. (2011). The views of prospective class teachers about peer assessment in teaching practice. Educational Sciences: Theory and Practice, 11(4), 1979-1989.

Speakers
avatar for Judy AK Bornais

Judy AK Bornais

Experiential Learning Specialist, Teaching Leadership Chair, University of Windsor
Judy Bornais is currently an Experiential Learning Specialist with the Faculty of Nursing. She feels that teaching has been at the core of her work as a practitioner and academic. Teaching nursing students appealed to Judy as an opportunity to make a broader contribution to health... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Cypress 1 Room
 
Friday, June 19
 

8:30am

CON10.09 - Developing institutional learning and teaching frameworks – The Royal Roads University experience
An institutional learning and teaching framework defines and communicates the academic qualities that help give a university or college its unique identity. Most institutional frameworks combine research from the current literature on learning, teaching, and pedagogical innovation with an inductively-generated description of the educational principles, characteristics, or elements that guide learning and teaching within the specific institution. The development of these frameworks is becoming more prevalent worldwide as universities and colleges strive to define and preserve a unique institutional identity amidst the broader post-secondary landscape (Hamilton, Marquez & Agger-Gupta, 2013a). This paper begins with an exploration of the rationale for creating an institutional framework for teaching and learning as well as an overview of the potential benefits and challenges. Several examples of different approaches will be described. Next, through a series of integrative exercises, participants will (1) identify why they would want to develop an institutional framework, (2) explore their initial thoughts on what a framework might look like at their institution and (3) map out a potential development process. To guide these activities, a case study will be presented describing the “Learning and Teaching Mode (LTM)” that has recently been developed at Royal Roads University. This model has been presented to a number of national and international conferences (Hamilton, Marquez, & Agger-Gupta, 2013a, Hamilton, Marquez, & Agger-Gupta, 2013b). The case study will explore why the LTM was created, how the process unfolded, what activities are currently being carried out to support its implementation as well as what future directions are being explored. 

References

Hamilton, D.N., Marquez, P. & Agger-Gupta, N.(2013a). Institutional frameworks that support learning and teaching – The Royal Roads University experience. Presented at the Learning Congress, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC. June 7th.

Hamilton, D.N., Marquez, P. & Agger-Gupta, N. (2013b). Real life, real learning – The Royal Roads University experience. Paper presented at the International Congress of Distance Education 25th World Conference, Tianjin, China, October 16-20, 2013.


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am
Salon 1

9:30am

CON11.03 - Exploring educational leadership: People, networks, practices
Traditional understandings of universities emphasize formal, hierarchical, and discipline-based silos, overlaid by centralized managerial structures. However, universities are also beginning to be understood as complex systems produced by autonomous, interdependent networks of individuals who operate on the basis of what they understand to be their own interests, or that of their various cohort group. There is considerable evidence that effecting change within such systems is enormously difficult, but that increased awareness of the dynamic nature of leadership may enhance the chances of successful change. Educational leaders, focused on the improvement of teaching and learning in universities, function within and among such networks. These leaders may establish credibility within multiple local networks, and may learn to navigate the larger system; however, most acquire these skills the hard way – on their own, through trial and error and without a supportive network. Based on a study of educational leadership at one institution and a series of workshops held with leaders from Canada and the United States, participants in this session will explore the implications of emerging international research on the 'distributed leadership' model. Participants will discuss some of the fundamental patterns which shape leadership practice in post-secondary settings, reflect on their leadership efforts, and explore the role of networks in inspiring and sustaining – or in potentially limiting – leadership capacity in their respective institutions.

Astin, A. & Astin, H. (2000). Leadership reconsidered: Engaging higher education in social change. Battle Creek: Kellogg Foundation.

Bolden, R., Petrov, G., & Gosling, J. (2008). Developing collective leadership in higher education, final report. London: Leadership Foundation for Higher Education.

Roxå, T. & Mårtensson, K. (2008). Significant conversations and significant networks: Exploring the backstage of the teaching arena. Studies of Higher Education. Retrieved from http://www. kuleuven.be/duo/_pdf/JournalClubArtikels.pdf

Trowler, P., Saunders, M., & Knight, P. (2003). Change thinking, change practices. A guide to change for Heads of Department, Programme Leaders, and other change agents in Higher Education, LTSN Generic Centre.

Speakers
avatar for Erika Kustra

Erika Kustra

Chair, Educational Developers Caucus
Erika Kustra became an educational developer in 1999, beginning to facilitate sessions earlier during her graduate and postdoctoral work in physiological psychology. She has been the EDC Secretary, STLHE Newsletter Editor, and participated in EDC Action Groups. In the last six years... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am
Bayshore Salon EF

9:30am

CON11.08 - Arts and IC technology: Transforming ‘seminar’ teaching and learning
The objective of this session is to explore the value of educators incorporating ‘Arts’ and ‘Information and Communication Technology’ (ICT) approaches in seminar classes. At the end of the session participants will be prepared to (1) identify the value of ‘Arts’ and ‘ICT’ approaches in facilitating deep learning; (2) self-reflect on their experience with ‘Arts’ and ‘ICT’ approaches, and (3) identify an ‘Arts’ or ‘ICT’ approach to incorporate into their teaching practice. This interactive presentation explicates the author’s vision of leadership through innovative teaching approaches. The author argues that student learning is enhanced when the development of the course syllabus (Small, 2014) includes planning for the weekly integration of ‘Arts’ and/or ‘ICT’ approaches. Such a creative dance engages learners’ hearts, minds, and bodies with the transformative teaching role being one of facilitating deep learning, creativity, and meaning making (Feller et al., 2004; Macdonnell & Macdonald, 2011). ‘Arts’ approaches include visual arts, poetry, music, and additional creative expressions that challenge students to dialogue and critically reflect upon their feelings, thoughts, and actions within a framework of social justice and equity (Macdonnell & Macdonald, 2011). ‘ICT’ approaches promote meaningful learning, guided by constructivist learning principles (Paily, 2013). Included are blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, internet, twitter, e-portfolios, texting, and film. The presentation will engage participants in several ‘Arts’ and ‘ICT’ approaches and reflective dialogue to generate a sense of the classroom experience of learners. Participants will be encouraged to identify one new ‘arts’ or ‘ICT’ approach to incorporate into their teaching practice. 

Feller, A., Jensen, A., Marie, D., Peddigrew, B., Clinchard-Speda, L., & Campbell, E. (2004). Quadrinity learning. Journal of Transformative Education, 2(3), 219-230.  doi:10.1177/1541344604265370

MacDonnell, J. & Macdonald, G.J. (2011). Arts based critical inquiry in nursing and interdisciplinary professional education: Guided imagery, images, narratives, and poetry. Journal of Transformative Education, 9 (4), 203 -212. doi:1177/1541344612441083

Paily, M.U. (2013). Creating constructivist learning environment: Role of “Web 2.0” technology. International Forum of Teaching and Studies, 9(1), 39-50. _x000D_
Small, D. (2014). Essay: Teaching adult students: Creating a syllabus. International Forum of Teaching and Studies, 10(2), 60-65.

Lead Speaker(s)
avatar for Geraldine Macdonald

Geraldine Macdonald

University of Toronto
Geraldine (Jody) Macdonald RN EdD is an Associate Professor, Teaching Stream at the Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto. She teaches community health nursing and facilitating learning in the undergraduate and graduate programs. She also enjoys provides service to the... Read More →

Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am
Director Room

10:45am

CON12.08 - Development and implementation of a campus-wide survey of faculty teaching practices and perceptions
During the 2014-2015 academic year, the University of British Columbia (University of British Columbia), ran a large, campus-wide survey to measure the impact of initiatives intended to influence teaching practices, provide data to inform strategic planning, and to inform a larger research project exploring factors that influence faculty to change teaching practices. In the first section of the survey, faculty provided details about teaching practices in their largest enrolment course. In the second section, faculty responded to both closed and open-ended questions about their attitudes toward specific teaching practices and their perceptions of the teaching climate at University of British Columbia. Over 1100 faculty with teaching responsibilities across 11 Faculties responded to the survey. This session is intended for those who may be interested in running a similar survey. In this session we will share the survey and discuss it’s evolution from an instrument developed in 2008 as part of a campus-wide initiative to modifications by various institutions in the Bay View Alliance as well as the Association of American Universities. We will also discuss how the survey was tested and how we achieved campus-wide buy-in which, despite no financial incentives, we believe resulted in a high number of responses. We will share high-level survey data, highlighting questions that were particularly useful and discussing areas where further modifications could improve internal validity. Finally, we’ll discuss how the results have been disseminated and share plans for future analysis.

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How learning works: Seven research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Kuh, G. D., Schneider, C. G., & Association of American Colleges and Universities. (2008). High-impact educational practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Sens, A., & Fryer, M. (2012). Enriched Educational Experiences at University of British Columbia: A Framework for Dialogue and Action. Retrieved from http://vpstudents.University of British Columbia.ca/files/2012/07/E3_framework_report_2012_final.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Han (University of British Columbia)

Andrea Han (University of British Columbia)

Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology - Senior Manager, Curriculum and Special Projects, University of British Columbia
avatar for Simon Bates (University of British Columbia)

Simon Bates (University of British Columbia)

Senior Advisor, Teaching and Learning | Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology., University of British Columbia
STLHE conference co-chair | Professor of Teaching in Physics and Astronomy at UBC, currently designing a new intro course for first year Physics students.


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am
Salon 1