Loading…
STLHE 2015 has ended
Achieving Harmony: Tuning into Practice

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Wednesday, June 17
 

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.01 - An interdepartmental curriculum map as a foundation for undergraduate life sciences curriculum reform
The Faculty of Science at Simon Fraser University is home to three life science departments: Biological Sciences (BISC), Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology (BPK), and Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (MBB). The BISC and MBB departments are in charge of the core lower division life science courses that serve to prepare undergraduates from all three departments for program-specific upper division courses. In order to ensure that these core courses are meeting the needs of students and faculty across the life sciences, we have conducted a systematic review of the undergraduate curriculum. This process was challenging due to the diversity of programs that undergraduates go on to complete (seven majors across the three departments) and the volume of information that was analyzed. We generated one large curriculum map with extensive input from faculty in all three departments. Instructors were guided through the process of writing learning outcomes for all of the core courses and many of the electives. We mapped learning outcomes from each course against those from core prerequisite courses and against program-level learning outcomes. This process allowed us to identify key concepts that were redundant between courses or that were omitted or under-emphasized in the curriculum. These areas of redundancy and overlap will be used as the foundation for change in the curriculum.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.02 - Discovery, redesign and fine-tuning: Laying the foundations for leadership competency building within students pursuing a four-year undergraduate business degree program.
In recent years, research has supported the need for undergraduate business students to be exposed to the attributes of leadership and the responsibilities of being a leader in the world of business (Kosicek, 2008; Getz, 2009). The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a cumulative development in leadership competency building amongst undergraduate business students in a Canadian university as they progress through each of their four years within their program. Results were to inform the necessary curriculum design changes thus ensuring this needed leadership foundation. Data was collected using focus groups comprised of students from all four years. A series of open ended questions were asked with respect to the areas of content, continuity, connection and flow from year one organizational behavior, to year two human resource management, to year three management skills leading up to a new year four leadership capstone course. Results revealed deficiencies in all areas and therefore strongly supported the need for better coordination, integration, and sequencing to produce the scaffolding for successful leadership competency building. The new fourth year capstone course will allow the students to apply first, second and third year principles of transactional leadership capabilities to the identification and improvement of their transformational leadership capabilities. The course will require students to build a leadership learning portfolio (LLP) comprising a number of reflections on their four-year commerce program journey, in and outside the classroom (courses; career building experiences; community engagement initiatives; exchange and cross-cultural experiences; volunteer work; professional relationship building).


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.04 - New interdisciplinary science course for first-year faculty of science students: Overview and results from the pilot
Transitioning to university can be a daunting endeavour, with student success dependent on a myriad of effects (Pascarella & Terenzini, 2005). Understanding how to navigate university systems, who to meet, how to get help, how to study and what goals to set can be hard to grasp (Valle et al., 2003). This session provides an overview of the new interdisciplinary foundations course, which piloted in Fall 2014, for first-year Faculty of Science students that i) provides a taste of research-based learning and develops essential skills that are important for their undergraduate degree and future academic or career plans, ii) exposes students to a wide range of departments and programs in the Faculty of Science, and iii) invites students to reflect on their academic journey and how it may be changing as a result of the course. This customized approach that intentionally teaches about institutional resources and expectations while offering opportunities to create networks of support is essential for student success and retention (Kuh, Cruce, Shoup, Kinzie, & Gonyea, 2008) and speaks to a number of considerations highlighted in the literature (e.g., Ambrose, Bridges, DiPietro, Lovett, & Norman, 2010). Other factors considered included balancing the needs of the Faculty, the resources available, and the goals, demands and interests of the students. In this poster presentation, we will describe the course’s design, structure and implementation, a key component of the course (week-long mini-research projects completed in small groups with support from upper-level science students), and preliminary results from a pedagogical study looking at student impact and perception.

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching (1st ed.). Jossey-Bass.

Kuh, G. D., Cruce, T. M., Shoup, R., Kinzie, J., & Gonyea, R. M. (2008). Unmasking the Effects of Student Engagement on First-Year College Grades and Persistence. The Journal of Higher Education, 79(5), 540–563. http://doi.org/10.1353/jhe.0.0019

Pascarella, E. T., & Terenzini, P. T. (2005). How College Affects Students: A Third Decade Of Research. Jossey-Bass Higher & Adult Education.

Valle, A., Cabanach, R. G., Núnez, J. C., González-Pienda, J., Rodríguez, S., & Piñeiro, I. (2003). Multiple goals, motivation and academic learning. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 73(1), 71–87. http://doi.org/10.1348/000709903762869923


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.46 - A comparison of selected undergraduate physiology programs in North America and the United Kingdom
_x000D_Introduction: There are few resources that provide a systematic comparison of the structure and content of undergraduate physiology programs from different institutions. We used web-based resources to examine the content currently covered in the undergraduate programs of established physiology departments in North America and the United Kingdom._x000D_ Methods: Institutions were selected using online university rankings. Data acquisition was performed in two steps. First, preliminary data were collected from an online search conducted using available websites for the institution and department/program of interest. Secondly, a member of the department (usually an undergraduate advisor) was contacted and asked to confirm/correct the details collected online._x000D_ Results: We found that: i) most degree programs require a similar quantity and variety of prerequisite basic science courses; ii) the number of core physiology courses required varies greatly from institution to institution, but the average student will take 5 core physiology courses as part of their degree program; iii) a large number of physiology-specific courses are offered in most departments; however, only a relatively small proportion of those courses are lab-based, animal-based, or have a distinct cellular focus; iv) all programs studied appeared to use a systems approach to instruction, with common key physiological systems identified._x000D_ Discussion: Overall, we have illustrated important demographic and program features from 15 institutions across North America and the United Kingdom. We believe this information may help provide better reference guidelines for educating undergraduate physiology students, to promote consistency within the degree level expectations of undergraduate physiology majors, regardless of the institution attended.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.05 - Slow facilitation: A collective, evidence-based approach to designing peer supports for teaching development
Mentorship has been documented as an effective approach to professional development in many disciplines (De Janasz & Sullivan, 2004). A growing body of evidence informs several different types of peer mentorship initiatives in higher education, including those that focus on professional development, progression to disciplinary maturity, and teaching development (Huston & Weaver, 2008). However, the success of peer mentorship initiatives appears to be partly dependent on how well they take contextual demands into consideration (Bernstein, Jonson, & Smith, 2000). 

The University of Calgary has recently implemented an institution-wide teaching awards program, which has generated a cohort of award winners who are both interested in and committed to contributing to peer support of teaching development on campus. In the effort to decide how the group would do this in a meaningful and sustainable way, the Educational Development Unit has facilitated a slow process of exploration and iterative decision making in order to establish a unique, evidence-based, context-driven peer support initiative for teaching development. 

After engaging with this poster presentation, participants should be able to: (a) conceptualize the process of slow facilitation, (b) imagine how slow facilitation for the purpose of developing a peer mentorship initiative would look at their home institution, and (c) develop one idea for starting a slow facilitation process. The presenter will provide an overview and artefacts of the slow facilitation process, and participate in interactive discussions about how such a process could be implemented at participants’ home institutions. 

Bernstein, D. J., Jonson, J., & Smith, K. (2000). An examination of the implementation of peer review of teaching. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 83, 73-86. doi: 10.1002/tl.8306

De Janasz, S. C., & Sullivan, S. E. (2004). Multiple mentoring in academe: Developing the professorial network. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 64, 263-283. doi: 10.1016/j.jvb.2002.07.001

Huston, T., & Weaver, C. L. (2008). Peer coaching: Professional development for experienced faculty. Innovation in Higher Education, 33(5), 5-20. doi: 10.1007/s10755-007-9061-9

Speakers
avatar for Robin Alison Mueller (University of Calgary)

Robin Alison Mueller (University of Calgary)

Educational Development Consultant (Faculty), University of Calgary


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.07 - Skill enhancement through teaching assistant training
With more than 60 teaching assistants annually helping educate over 3,000 undergraduate students, TAs play a critical role in undergraduate education in the Sociology Department at the University of British Columbia. TAs take on a variety of responsibilities including marking, lecturing, facilitating workshops, invigilating exams, interacting with students in office hours and via email, and leading discussion groups. Novice TA skills can range widely thus effective TA training is paramount. Our TA training consists of four workshops and an evaluation session held at the beginning of the academic year. These workshops focus on skill building through case studies where participants discuss scenarios, with opportunities for veteran TAs to share their experiences and for new TAs to voice their concerns. Emphasis is placed on skills that can be easily adapted, such as professional communication. Each workshop encourages students to interact, promoting a high level of peer social support and collaboration. We conclude with an evaluation session where participants provide feedback that guides future workshops. This poster provides a detailed overview of our TA training program, including the program learning goals and structure as well as plans for revision based on feedback from participants, reviews of best practices, and consultation with faculty members. By the end of this facilitated poster session, participants will be able to identify the key goals of each of four training sessions and articulate the ways in which the program supports both undergraduate and graduate student teaching assistants in their skill development.

Hogan, T. P., Norcross, J. C., Cannon, J. T., & Karpiak, C. P. (2007). Working with and training undergraduates as teaching assistants. Teaching of Psychology, 34(3), 187-190.

Pentecost, T. C. (2012). Graduate teaching assistant training that forsters student-centered instruction and professional development. Journal of College Science Teaching, 41(6), 68-75.

Shannon, D. M., Twale, D. J., Moore, M. S. (1998). TA teaching effectiveness: The impact of training and teacher experience. The Journal of Higher Education, 69(4), 440-466.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.08 - Competency based strategies to support faculty development
The urgent call to transform and reform educational practices rings loud across higher educational landscapes, nationally and internationally (Cohen & Kisker, 2010; Hutchings, Huber, & Ciccone, 2011). According to higher education leaders, a major paradigm shift is needed in the way educators view student learning and evaluation (Bass, 2012; Bain, 2004). To assist faculty at a multisite, multi-program nursing college to successfully transform their teaching practices, a structured faculty development program was implemented to promote the effective use of evidence-based learner-centered strategies. This presentation will examine a new faculty development model to promote the effective use of evidence-based pedagogies to optimize student learning. The framework of the faculty development program includes: (a) the formation of a culture that supports and recognizes scholarly teaching, (b) the formation of an organizational infrastructure that facilitates the successful implementation of the faculty development program across a multi-campus, multistate, undergraduate nursing college, and (c) the use of evidence-based pedagogical strategies to ensure positive student learning experiences and achievement of learning outcomes. This new faculty development model guides, develops, and evaluates the pedagogical knowledge base and learner-centered strategies educators need to optimize student learning. The learner-centered strategies were added to the end of course survey which evaluates faculty. Evaluation of the model includes end of course student survey results and grade distribution over a two year period. 

Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bass, R. (2012). Disrupting ourselves: The problem of learning in higher education. Educause Review, March/April, 2012. 

Cohen, A.M. & Kisker, C.B . (2010). The shaping of American higher education: Emergence and growth of the contemporary system. (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Hutchings, P., Huber, M.T., & Ciccone, A. (2011). The scholarship of teaching and learning reconsidered: Institutional integration and impact. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.09 - A mentoring model: Support structures and resources for community building
Mentoring is an integral aspect of both personal and professional development. Through our research, we are inquiring into the various resources, strategies, theories and frameworks that support effective mentoring relationships at the post-secondary level. Research has identified mentoring as one of the key methods in assisting teachers in their professional growth since it provides mentees with practical support that helps them gain self-confidence, solve problems and apply critical thinking skills to situations affecting student learning (Crow 2007,Hubball et al. 2010). This poster presentation provides an example of an investigation of mentors working with in service K-12 teachers providing small group and one-on-one support, resources, theory, and feedback to support the critical examination and assessment of teaching practice. In this model, mentors engage in relationship building and co-construct a community of practice, collaborating with teachers as they participate in three inquiry-based field studies and a portfolio of their learning. To support mentors, we are developing a shared resource ‘bank’ that can be accessed by mentors and program staff to support teacher learning and encourage leadership. Paraphrasing and questioning prompts, community building activities, and generational and learning style tools are examples of these resources. This poster will provide details of the Mentor/Mentee relationship and the tools included in the resource bank. A QRC will be included for access to resources that others can use to support a mentoring model in their own context.

Crow, G.M., 2007. The professional and organizational socialization of new English head-teachers in school reform contexts. Educational management, administration & leadership, 35 (1), 51–71.

Hubball, H., Clarke, A., and Poole, G., 2010. Ten-year reflections on mentoring SoTL research in a research-intensive university. International Journal for Academic Development, 15 (2), 117–129.

Speakers

Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.10 - A dietetics professional practice course transformed: Students as creators of knowledge
The project team redeveloped, evaluated and refined a pre-practicum professional practice course for the Dietetics program. Stakeholder feedback highlighted issues students experience transitioning to professional environments, which provided the impetus for the project. These issues included: low learning engagement and difficulty applying foundational knowledge during practicum. The pilot course incorporated self-directed learning approaches in order to increase learning engagement and knowledge recall during practicum. Research shows that active, self-directed learning builds self-efficacy, successful performance, and workplace leadership (Boyer et al., 2014). In the pilot course, student groups researched subjects surrounding preparation for practice with the support of professional advisors. Each group identified learning needs, researched this narrowed topic, and created educational content (including media for online sharing, and an interactive workshop for peers). Evaluation showed the pilot course supported student engagement and ownership of learning. Students reported their technological and networking skills improved, and they valued the student-led workshops. Michel et al. (2009) noted similar findings; students in active-learning environments were more participative, accountable, and able to retain knowledge. Students shared that the student-created-media was of greatest value during practicum preparation, when opportunities for exposure to experiential learning in practice settings were not yet available. These results show promise for applying similar pedagogical approaches in preparing for asynchronous learning in professional programs. The objectives of this facilitated poster session are: (1) to share experiences with a course re-design initiative and its effect on learning, and (2) to discuss with attendees strategies to address gaps between academic learning and professional practice. 

Boyer, S.L., Edmondson, D.R., Artis, A.B. and Fleming, D. (2014) Self-directed learning: a tool for lifelong learning. Journal of Marketing Education, 36, 20. doi: 10.1177/0273475313494010

Michel, N., Cater, J., & Varela, O. (2009). Active versus passive teaching styles: An empirical study of student learning outcomes. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 20(4), 397-418. doi: 10.1002/hrdq.20025



Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.11 - Building community, encouraging support: Three streams of student mentoring in University of British Columbia Sociology
Graduate students in the Department of Sociology at the University of British Columbia have been organizing the Sociology Student Mentorship Program since 2010. Approximately 36 students participate in the program annually. This poster provides a detailed overview of the three program streams: undergraduate mentoring, teaching assistant mentoring, and graduate student mentoring. This group of students is often overlooked within the mentorship literature focused on first year undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty (Countryman & Zinck, 2013; Goff, 2011; Le Cornu, 2005). The poster also includes information about the program goals, structure and events. Student photos and experiences are profiled. This facilitated poster session will enable participants to engage directly with the organizers of the peer-mentorship program to discuss experiences, challenges and best practices. By the end of the poster session, participants will be able to identify the key characteristics of each mentorship stream and will be able to articulate the ways in which the program supports mentoring partnerships throughout the term. Overall, our presentation can help establish best practices for the structure of academic peer mentorship programs in post-secondary institutions. 

References:

Countryman, J . & Zinck, A. (2013). Building connections in the first-year undergraduate experience. The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 4(2), 1-18.

Goff, L. (2011). Evaluating the outcomes of a peer-mentoring program for students transitioning to postsecondary education. The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 2(2), 1-13.

Le Cornu, R. (2005). Peer mentoring: Engaging pre-service teachers in mentoring one another. Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning, 13(3), 355-366.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.12 - Do we need to teach in harmony? Developing a food science concept inventory to measure learning effectiveness and fine-tune our teaching practices
The need of a common evaluation tool to assess student learning was identified in an introductory food science course. The course attracts a diverse audience in both science and arts discipline that have an interest in food. The challenge of student prior knowledge of food is compounded by increased enrollment and a course that operates with multi-sections and instructors using different teaching strategies. A concept inventory was developed to measure student knowledge and identify student misconceptions (Adam & Wieman, 2010). Concept inventory is a set of multiple-choice questions where the distractors (wrong answers) are purposely designed to represent commonly held misconceptions. It can be used to identify how many students in a class have mastered a concept and common misconceptions within the class (Garvin-Doxas et al. 2007). Concept Inventories have been developed for undergraduate biology (Kalas et al.,2013) and physics (Adams & Wieman, 2011) courses. This poster session presents the first concept inventory for food science education (FSCI). Common student misconceptions were identified by analysis of exam results (n=229) and a student survey using open ended questions (n=73 ) followed by two student focus groups. Eleven multiple choice questions were developed and tested in 4 sections (n=435) at the start and end of the course. Expert interviews (n=10) were used to evaluate the distractors and modifications to FSCI are reported. These results and their value in the assessment of teaching effectiveness are discussed. The food science topics introduced in this course are prerequisites to study within a food science curriculum. A subset of the questions could be used to test retention at start of senior level courses. How else can we use the FSCI? Teach to the concepts explicitly? Aim to improve the post-test results? How can we use post test results to improve teaching and eventually student learning? We look forward to hearing your candid feedback on these questions.

Adams WK, and Wieman CE. 2010. Development and validation of instruments to measure learning of expert-like thinking. Int J Sci Educ 33:1-24. DOI:10.1080/09500693.2010.512369

Garvin-Doxas K, Klymkowsky M, Elrod S. 2007. Building, using, and maximizing the impact of concept inventories in the biological sciences: report on a National Science Foundation sponsored conference on the construction of concept inventories in the biological sciences. CBE Life Sci Educ 6:277-282. doi: 10.1187/cbe.07-05-0031

Kalas P, O’Neill A, Pollock C, Birol G. 2013. Development of a meiosis concept inventory. CBE Life Sci Educ 12:655-664. doi: 10.1187/cbe.12-10-0174

Speakers
avatar for Judy Chan

Judy Chan

Education Consultant, Faculty Liaison, University of British Columbia
UBC


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.13 - Easing the shock: Improving first generation transfer student success in their transition to a 4-year institution
Community college transfer students are a rapidly growing subset of the student population at research institutions. In spite of their growing numbers, strategies to support their adjustment at the university level have largely been neglected. Difficulty with academic, social and psychological adjustment (Laanan, 2004) to the university take a toll on transfer students’ academic performance resulting in a GPA drop in the first year (termed “transfer shock”;Hills, 1965). This phenomenon is exacerbated for students in STEM majors, traditionally underrepresented minorities (URM) and first generation students. Transfer shock puts transfer students at a disadvantage in their future academic endeavors because their resulting graduation GPA may not be highly competitive. Most studies on the community college post-transfer experience have concentrated on understanding and measuring students' difficulty at the new institution, but little is known about the systematic implementation of interventions to facilitate the adjustment process and reduce the transfer shock.

We will present the preliminary results of a longitudinal randomized control study, which examines the effect of an intervention designed to reduce transfer shock for 67 URM and/or first generation STEM transfer students at a large four-year university. The intervention implemented a model that combines a two-week research intensive, seminars, and peer mentoring. The program is designed to improve academic motivation and identity, resulting in improvements in students’ academic achievement. We will present the findings on the impact of the program on students’ first and second quarter GPA, as well as academic/psychological adjustment measures.

Laanan, F. S. (2004). Studying transfer students: Part I: Instrument design and implications. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 28(4), 331-351.

Hills, John R. "Transfer shock: The academic performance of the junior college transfer." The Journal of Experimental Educational (1965): 201-215.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.14 - Two successful strategies for improving students’ academic writing and study skills in Australia
Many of the University of Newcastle (UoN), Australia’s students come from backgrounds including low SES, first-in-family and mature students, and they are underprepared to succeed at university study. UoN has recently implemented two strategies (one synchronous and one asynchronous) that provide academic writing and study skills to help these students achieve academic success. A student mentoring drop-in service utilising the skills of post-graduate students has been implemented to offer just-in-time assistance to students. Peer-supported writing programs available at other Australian rural university campuses were investigated (Dooley, Mc Niece & Martin, 2012; Williamson and Goldsmith, 2013) and the program initiated. The drop-in replaces individual consultations and structured workshops, and allows ‘just in time’ style support from post-graduate students in an open door fashion. A second support service, econsult, provides written feedback on a piece of writing by email. In 2010-11 we began exploring options for support that would best cater for students who were time poor, and juggling a variety of commitments that included study. As email usage is one of the most commonly held skills (Gray, et al, 2009) this was seen as the most effective method of making the service widely available. Any student can post their selected piece of writing and questions to the econsult address, and they are provided detailed personalised feedback within two days. This is especially helpful for students with multiple external commitments. Also, as most support offered is synchronous, it more closely aligns with the asynchronous nature of online and blended course delivery.

References:

Dooley, S., Mc Niece, A., & Martin, J. (2012, November). Undergraduate students as academic skills tutors: A transformative experience. Paper presented at Students Support Student Learning (SSSL) Symposium, Victoria University, Melbourne. Retrieved from http://www.aall.org.au/sites/default/files/SSSL%20Symposium%202012%20eBook_0.pdf

Gray, K., Kennedy, G., Waycott, J., Dalgarno, B., Bennett, S., Chang, R., Judd, t., Bishop, A., Maton, K. and Krause, K (2009). Educating the Net Generation – A Toolkit for Educators in Australian Universities – 2009. Support for the original work was provided by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council Ltd, an initiative of the Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. Retrieved from http://www.netgen.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/toolkit/NetGenToolkit.pdf

Williamson, F. & Goldsmith, R. (2013) PASSwrite: Recalibrating student academic literacies development. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice. 10(2). Retrieved from http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol10/iss2/r


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.44 - Learner-centered simulations for pre-graduate nursing students: Tuning into their clinical practice needs
Nursing students in our accelerated undergraduate program participate in structured simulations in all clinical courses throughout their two-year program of study. This poster will discuss the pilot use of impromptu student-driven simulations to prepare pre-graduation students for their final practicum. At least half of the class comes into consolidation following a community placement and experience anxiety related to their skill level and lack of recent practice in a hospital setting. The purpose of the pilot was to help students feel more confident about their upcoming placement by practicing self-identified skills and techniques in the context of a situation as close to reality as possible._x000D_
_x000D_
Senior students were invited to sign up ahead of time, specify their learning needs (e.g. giving injections, focused health assessment, prioritizing, etc.), and identify their upcoming clinical placement (e.g. medicine, surgery, etc.). Student groups of six or less worked together in the lab for 2- 4 hours just prior to the start of their practicum. Two faculty members experienced in simulation learning led the scenarios and debriefing sessions. Little preliminary work was done on the simulations. Most scenario development was tailored to the students in the scenario and done on the fly. Pre-simulation briefing was very important to ensure “a psychologically safe context for learning” and active engagement of student learners who did not know each other very well (Rudolph, Raemer & Simon, 2014). Highlights of this learner-centered activity as well as feedback from both students and faculty involved will be shared in this poster._x000D_
_x000D_
Onda, E.L. (2012). Situated cognition: Its relationship to simulation in nursing education. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 8, e273-e280._x000D_
_x000D_
Rudolph, J.W., Raemer, D.B., & Simon, R. (2014). Establishing a safe container for learning in simulation: The role of the presimulation briefing. Simulation in Healthcare, 9(6), 339-349._x000D_
_x000D_
Wooley, N.N. & Jarvis, Y. (2007). Situated cognition and cognitive apprenticeship: A model for teaching and learning clinical skils in a technologically rich and authentic learning environment. Nurse Education Today, 27, 73-79.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.45 - Development of an exit survey to evaluate undergraduate student learning experiences
All University departments are required to undertake internal and external review of their undergraduate programs. Self-assessment is a key component of this process, and student surveys are one commonly used metric of student satisfaction with their educational experiences._x000D_ Informed by historical student experience data from our department and newly conducted student focus group data, we developed an undergraduate student exit survey to evaluate student perspectives of their learning experiences. Our instrument used a combination of selected items from past departmental survey instruments, items from the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), and newly developed items to reflect departmental needs and local context. Our instrument was further refined through peer checking (review by colleagues) and pilot testing. We hope such a systematic approach to student experience survey development informs attendees’ practice at their own institutions._x000D_ Data collected from the survey will be used for internal and external review, and to guide and assess program improvement initiatives, current educational practice, and educational goals. In addition to the benefits to our own programs, we believe this survey contains many general questions about the students’ academic experiences, and would easily be applied to other programs. In relation to the programs offered by our department, we have identified through the survey a number of strengths, as well as opportunities to modify our educational practices. We believe we have developed a reliable instrument to track changes in student perceptions of their educational experiences in response to program modification over time.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.15 - Teaching students argumentation visually with the dialectical map
There is a growing interest in argumentation, its pedagogical significance, and the teaching of argumentation skills. Research has found correlations between students’ argumentation skills and their critical thinking process, which is central to higher education. However, evidence shows that students often lack good argumentation skills. This presentation introduces a newly developed argumentation visualization tool, the Dialectical Map (DM), which facilitates the teaching of argumentation skills. The DM is a hybrid of argument maps and argument vee diagrams . Students create DMs by identifying and composing claims, evidence, and warrants in a computer-supported environment. They then draw an integrated conclusion by evaluating arguments and counterarguments in a visually hierarchical structure. In a lab experiment and two implementations in university-level biology classes, preliminary findings show improvements in students’ argumentation skills over time. Students’ improved argumentation skills showed transfer, with matching improvements in writing styles, organization of information, and reasoning skills. Students responded very positively to the DM. One student said, “It challenged us to learn how to argue effectively.” Another said, “The DM challenged my ability to argue a topic. I thought I had skills [in argumentation] before, but I don't think I was actually very skilled.” The presentation includes the concept of argumentation and its role in teaching and learning. Diagrams are given on how to construct a DM. We then present findings from our case studies using the DM and conclude the presentation with a brief discussion.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.16 - Tuning into student perceptions of eportfolio use for reflective learning and leadership development
Creating 21st century leaders is the focus of a MBA program in Southwestern Ontario. To build leadership capacity among MBA students through reflective learning, ePortfolios were used as an intervention in a thirteen-week course. ePortfolios have been used for reflective learning in higher education and teacher education (Jafari & Kaufman, 2006), but few studies have explored its use among business students (Eynon, Gambio, & Török, 2014). This mixed-methods study investigated student perceptions of ePortfolio use to support transformative learning and leadership development in a MBA program. Analyses of pre-and post-intervention surveys reveal that students’ initial positive attitudes towards ePortfolios were sustained throughout the course as a tool for reflection and communication. Interviews with students, faculty, administrators and staff and content analyses suggest students engaged in transformative learning and leadership development by demonstrating awareness of their leadership strengths, how their awareness changed the way they lead, what type of leader they wanted to become, and the type of leader they were becoming. However, sustaining continued ePortfolio use throughout the program was a challenge. Strategic implementation of ePortfolios from the beginning of the MBA program and support throughout the program modules is needed to help students sustain ePortfolio use and benefit from continued self-reflection for leadership development. The poster presentation will engage participants by sharing ePortfolio exemplars, excerpts from interviews, and a reflective activity to generate shared understanding of how students perceive integration of ePortfolios into a MBA program. 

Eynon, B., Gambino, L. M., & Török, J. (2014). What difference can an ePortfolio make? A Field Report from the Connect to Learning Project. LaGuardia Community College (CUNY). 

Jafari, A., & Kaufman, C. (2006). Handbook of research on ePortfolios. Hershey, PA: Idea Group Reference.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.17 - Tuning into technology: An autobiographical study of the development of teachers' educational technology competencies
This presentation reports the results of a retrospective study of the life-long, technology learning experiences of a sample of technology-literate teachers to determine if there are transformative patterns of experience explaining the development of their information technology (IT) competencies. The teachers completed IT autobiographies that included a timeline of the major IT milestones for the past 40 years and spaces to write biographical explanations of their personal experiences with the particular milestones that were relevant to them. To assist recall, each milestone was graphically illustrated and verbally captioned to explain its historical significance. Mixed-methods analyses of the autobiographies indicated that emergent technologies frequently set trends that supported the learning of both those technologies and IT in general. One example is that a quantitative comparison of the teachers’ education experiences indicated that informal education was significantly more important than formal education for the development of their IT competencies. Another example is that a qualitative analysis of the IT autobiographies indicated there were several common patterns of experience that have facilitated the development of teachers’ IT competencies. Some of these included parents’ purchases of home computers, access to computer games, the presence of IT mentors, and the availability of IT equipment at their schools. 

References:

Anderson, S., Groulx, J., & Maninger, R. (2012). Relationships among pre-service teachers’ technology-related abilities, beliefs, and intentions to use technology in their future classrooms. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 45(3), 321-338.

Aubrey, C., & Dahl, S. (2014). The confidence and competence in information and communication technologies of practitioners, parents and young children in the early years foundation stage. Early Years: An International Journal of Research and Development, 34(1), 94-108.

Prestige, S. (2012). The beliefs behind teachers that influences their ICT practices. Computers and Education, 58, 449-458.

Thompson, P. (2013). The digital natives as learners: Technology use patterns and approaches to learning. Computers & Education, 65, 12-33.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.18 - Women and gamification: Disassembling the gendered classroom
This poster examines the literature in both traditional gaming and educational technology spheres, and uses feminist theory and user demographics to deconstruct enthusiasm for existing instructional gamification methods. Current literature shows that gamified learning environments, including systems using engagement tools such as badges, leaderboards, and so forth, can discourage female and female-identified students from participation or competition due to lack of familiarity, lack of representation, and perceived gender bias. Additionally, literature examining higher education instructional settings reveals that gamified online learning environments can disproportionately encourage male success and perpetuate stereotypes about female educational successes in spite of measured aptitude. Use of gamification elements like scoreboards, use of “violent language”, and mandatory self-identification can discourage and lead to the disengagement of female learners. Additionally, as males represent a disproportionate number of video gamers in their personal time, they are at a distinct advantage regarding video game mechanics, controls, and familiarity with competition structure. Conversely, some gamification methods, particularly those which encourage or facilitate community building, like discussion forums or other collaborative formats, can encourage female participation in online learning environments, and should be explored further to maximize student successes. Because gamification has been identified as a valuable tool to encourage engagement in learners across a broad population group, further research is needed to determine best next-steps for better encouraging female learner success without compromising long-established male learner successes in this type of learning environment.

Ahuja, M. K., & Thatcher, J. B. (2005). Moving beyond intentions and toward the theory oftrying: Effects of work environment and gender on post-adoption information technologyuse. MIS Quarterly, 29, 427–459.

Cassell, J., & Jenkins, H (1998). From Barbie to Mortal Kombat: Gender and computer games.Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Christy, K., & Fox, J. (2014). Leaderboards in a virtual classroom: A test of stereotype threat andsocial comparison explanations for women's math performance. Computers &Education, 78, 66–77. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2014.05.005

Deterding, S., Björk, S., Nacke, L., Dixon, D., & Lawley, E. (2013). Designing gamification:Creating gameful and playful experiences. Proceedings of the CHI Conference on HumanFactors in Computing Systems: Changing Perspectives, Paris, France. 3263–3266.doi:10.1145/2468356.2479662


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.19 - Barriers faced by undergraduate students when reading primary literature
This investigation uncovers student attitudes and approaches to reading life sciences primary literature. Personal, anecdotal (Spiegelberg, 2014), and systematic (van Lacum, Ossevoort, Buikema & Goedhart, 2012) observations suggest that undergraduate students follow a text-based reading strategy, and avoid making independent conclusions based on results and methodology. While the student process of deep vs. surface learning has been examined for several decades (Marton & Säljö, 1976), it needs more investigation into student practices of interpreting biomedical literature (van Lacum, et al.). In this inquiry, students enrolled in a 1st year general biology course (HSCI100 – Human Biology), or a 4th year seminar course (HSCI477 – Senior Seminar in Vaccine Immunology) were assigned a primary literature article, and their reading strategies were assessed by survey. In both classes, we found that students rated the methods section as the least important for helping them understand the paper. Fourth year students spent more time reading the results section than first year students, however, they emphasized text rather than interpretation of figures. Given these observations, activities and assessments should cultivate student appreciation of methodology and direct students into reading practices that emphasize independent interpretation of results. These findings will be used as a basis for further inquiry into individual student reading strategies. Ultimately, these data will inform the design of layered assessments that build student skills in this practice from first year to fourth year.

Reference List:

Marton, F., & Säljö, R. (1976). On qualitative differences in learning. I. Outcome and process. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 46, 4-11. 

Spiegelberg, B.D. (2014). A focused assignment encouraging deep reading in undergraduate biochemistry. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, 42(1), 1-5. 

van Lacum, E., Ossevoort, M., Buikema, H. & Goedhart, M. (2012). First experiences with reading primary literature by undergraduate life science students. International Journal of Science Education, 34(12), 1795-1821.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.20 - Exploring undergraduates' learning strategies and metacognition in an introductory science course
In introductory science and math courses, several students struggle with adopting appropriate study strategies for learning the course material (Grove & Bretz, 2012; Lynch & Trujillo, 2011). As such, scholars call for curriculum and pedagogy that improves students’ learning strategies and metacognition (Tanner, 2012). That is, for curriculum and pedagogy that encourages students to control, evaluate, plan, and monitor their learning (Anderson & Nashon, 2007). This presentation will provide an overview of a mixed methods research project that investigated the catalysts for metacognitive change in a large, second-year organic chemistry course. This course has a reputation of being difficult and as such, the instructor developed several formative resources (i.e. in-class quizzes, study strategy workshops) to provide students with explicit feedback on their learning strategies. A case study approach employing a metacognitive instrument, classroom observations, and one-on-one interviews offered a window into the supports and barriers students perceived as prompting them to address and/or change their approaches to learning. Analysis of the data revealed summative assessments (i.e. midterm and final examinations) as overshadowing the use and usefulness of the resources designed specifically to enhance student learning and metacognition. As such, several students struggled with the course content and found it hard to make effective adjustments to their learning strategies. Ideally, the presentation of this research will engage STLHE scholars in discussions about how we may balance formative and summative assessment in higher education to enhance students’ learning strategies and metacognition.

Anderson, D., & Nashon, S. (2007). Predators of knowledge construction: Interpreting students' metacognition in an amusement park physics program. Science Education, 91(2), 298-320.

Grove, N. P., & Bretz, S. L. (2012). A continuum of learning: from rote memorization to meaningful learning in organic chemistry. Chemistry Education Research and Practice, 13, 201-208

Lynch, D. J., & Trujillo, H. (2011). Motivational beliefs and learning strategies in organic chemistry. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 9(1351-1365).

Tanner, K. (2012). Promoting student metacognition. CBE - Life Sciences Education, 11(2), 113-120.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.21 - Expose yourself to the scholarship of teaching and learning
Forms of research, like human bodies, have multiple entry points which, when identified and understood, can be used to ease the transition into new fields of research. In this poster, we will use the human body as a metaphor to explain how researchers from diverse disciplines can use familiar entry points to ease their transition into the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). As a universal and inherently meaningful feature of life for necessarily embodied human beings, the body is a uniquely relatable metaphorical source of identity. In academia, our identities as researchers are similarly crucial to our sense of who we are and how we navigate and explore our own and other disciplines.

This poster highlights visual representations of the connections between the elements and systems of research with their analogues in the human body, as well as the connections between systems within each member of that metaphorical pair. For example, in the body, two of the digestive system’s primary functions are to absorb nutrients and eliminate waste; comparatively, when we, as researchers, are sifting through countless books and articles in search of evidence, it is imperative we are critical and efficient – absorbing the good, and eliminating the bad. Entry points, system elements, means and types of connections, and functions will be represented to help those entering SoTL better situate themselves in this new field, along the way demystifying its vocabulary and expectations, making it less intimidating and more accessible.

Boyer, E.L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the professoriate. New Jersey: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

Hutchings, P. & Shulman, L.S. (1999). The scholarship of teaching: New elaborations, new developments. Change, September/October, 1999, 10‐15.

Meyer, J. & Land, R. (2003). Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge: Linkages to ways of thinking and practicing within the disciplines. Occasional Report No 4, Enhancing Teaching-Learning Environments in Undergraduate Courses Project, Universities of Edinburgh, Coventry and Durham.

Shulman, L.S. (2000). Inventing the future. In P. Hutchings (Ed.), Opening lines: Approaches to the scholarship of teaching and learning. Menlo Park, CA: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.22 - Faculty perceptions of challenges and enablers of effective teaching
The University of British Columbia (University of British Columbia), home to both campus-wide and Faculty-specific teaching and learning centres, hosts numerous initiatives targeting the improvement of student learning and the student experience. This includes the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative (Faculty of Science, launched in 2007) and the Flexible Learning Initiative (University of British Columbia wide, launched in 2013). In fall 2014, University of British Columbia ran a campus-wide survey on teaching practices with the following goals: a) Establishing baseline information of teaching practices and attitudes among faculty, b) Measuring the impact of existing teaching and learning initiatives such as those mentioned above, and c) Recognizing the conditions leading to change in practices and attitudes around teaching (Borrego & Henderson, 2014). This survey was a modified version of a tool used to investigate the teaching climate at University of British Columbia in 2008. Over 1000 faculty with teaching responsibilities across 10 Faculties responded to the 2014 survey. In this session we will discuss the comments and insights shared by participants around the following issues: the biggest challenges for teaching; changes that could be made at University of British Columbia to help faculty teach more effectively; and factors that have improved their teaching. In this session we will be sharing our methodology and preliminary results on the main challenges and enablers of effective teaching practice at this large research-intensive institution. We will also discuss with the audience connections to existing research (Ambrose, Bridges, DiPietro, Lovett, & Norman, 2010; Kuh, Kinzie, Schuh, & Whitt, 2005) and the connections and implications of our findings for their institutional contexts.

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How learning works: Seven research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Borrego, M., & Henderson, C. (2014). Increasing the use of evidence-based teaching in STEM higher education: A comparison of eight change strategies. Journal of Engineering Education, 103(2), 220–252. doi:10.1002/jee.20040.

Kuh, G. D., Kinzie, J., Schuh, J. H., & Whitt, E. J. (2005). Student success in college: Creating conditions that matter. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Han (University of British Columbia)

Andrea Han (University of British Columbia)

Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology - Senior Manager, Curriculum and Special Projects, University of British Columbia
avatar for Simon Bates (University of British Columbia)

Simon Bates (University of British Columbia)

Senior Advisor, Teaching and Learning | Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology., University of British Columbia
STLHE conference co-chair | Professor of Teaching in Physics and Astronomy at UBC, currently designing a new intro course for first year Physics students.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.23 - Insights from the inaugural cohort of an innovative first-year undergraduate program for international students
This poster presentation showcases innovative aspects of a new first-year undergraduate program for international students at the University of British Columbia. Launched in September 2014, University of British Columbia Vantage College (www.vantagecollege.University of British Columbia.ca) provides a venue for international students who wish to pursue undergraduate studies in Applied Science, Arts, Management or Science, yet who do not meet direct entry English language requirements. Students complete a rigorous first year of credit-bearing courses that prepares them for their second year of study. Courses in the Vantage One program are connected using interdisciplinary approaches and following a language and content integrated learning model (Coyle, Hood, & Marsh, 2010; Crandall & Kaufman, 2002). For each content course (e.g., Physics, Political Science, Psychology), students attend a linked academic English tutorial that enhances students’ comprehension of the concepts and topics, while simultaneously raising their awareness of the language resources used in the respective disciplinary fields. This presentation will outline the Vantage One Program curriculum structure and ways in which collaborative teaching practices are adopted, together with some initial program evaluation findings related to student expectations and perceptions. These preliminary findings from our first student cohort are drawn from quantitative and qualitative analyses of student surveys. A student-facing report of these results was developed and shared with current students to support and enrich their learning experience. Details about the program structure, students in our first cohort, teaching approaches, and program evaluation will be shared, leaving the audience with some innovative ideas to implement in their own programs and teaching.

Coyle, D., Hood, P., & Marsh, D. (2010). Content and language integrated learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Crandall, J. A., & Kaufman, D. (Eds.). (2002). Content-based instruction in higher education settings. Alexandria, VA: TESOL, Inc.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.24 - Institutional teaching cultures: Tuning our attention to process metrics in an era of assessment and accountability
There are increasing demands to find metrics that account for the quality of student learning and teaching (Chalmers, 2008), yet many of the currently available metrics focus on inputs and outputs. To create a more harmonious and holistic view of the quality of teaching and learning, we advocate for also identifying process and outcome metrics that can demonstrate the value, importance, and enhancement of the quality of teaching that our institutions provide. An institutional culture that values teaching quality is likely to improve student learning (Cox, McIntosh, Reason, & Terenzini, 2011). By including process metrics, we can document institutional teaching cultures and provide useful benchmarks for institutions in their ongoing enhancement of teaching and learning. Continuing from preliminary work presented lasted year (Wolf et al, 2014) and based on results from our pilot study at three Ontario institutions, we have refined the Teaching Culture Perception Survey (TCPS). This survey aims to assess educators’ current perceptions of their institutional teaching culture, as well as their perceptions of the importance of various components that comprise a teaching culture. For this interactive poster, we will update participants on our expanding project that now involves over 10 institutions from Ontario and Quebec working collaboratively to tune and test the TCPS. Participants will have an opportunity to share their insights and provide feedback on the revised TCPS, by discussing our current process and outcome indicators and identifying additional ones to consider. 

Chalmers, D., (2008). Indicators of University Teaching and Learning Quality, Australian Learning and Teaching Council, Australia. 

Cox, B. E., McIntosh, K. L., Reason, R. D., & Terenzini, P. T. (2011). A culture of teaching: Policy, perception, and practice in higher education. Research in Higher Education, 52(8), 808-829.

Hénard, F., & Roseveare, D. (2012). Fostering Quality Teaching in Higher Education: Policies and Practices: An IMHE Guide for Higher Education Institutions, Institutional Management in Higher Education, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development www.oecd.org/edu/imhe.

Wolf, P., Ellis, D., Grose, J., Goff, L., Dawson, D., Meadows, K., Doci, F., & Borin, P. (2014). Documenting and transforming institutional teaching cultures. Presented at the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, June 17-20, 2014: Kingston ON.

Speakers
avatar for Erika Kustra

Erika Kustra

Chair, Educational Developers Caucus
Erika Kustra became an educational developer in 1999, beginning to facilitate sessions earlier during her graduate and postdoctoral work in physiological psychology. She has been the EDC Secretary, STLHE Newsletter Editor, and participated in EDC Action Groups. In the last six years... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.25 - Iterative practice, iterative pedagogy: Integrating writing and studio education to foster reflective teaching and transformative learning in the first-year graphic design Classroom
This poster highlights the preliminary findings of a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) pilot project in design education exploring how the design concept of iteration – understood as a practice including research, (re)drafting, reflecting and revising – fosters critical engagement in the first-year Graphic Design classroom. Critical engagement and discourse are fundamental to the process of transformative learning (Mezirow, 2003; Cranton, 2006). They are also fundamental to the process of making: students must recognize preconceptions, undertake research, understand, deconstruct and draw upon the work of other designers, present and discuss their own designs, and provide constructive feedback on the work of their peers. Yet first-year students often lack the necessary skills to productively undertake these processes, and overestimate their abilities to do so as a result of unarticulated habits of mind and unexamined assumptions about research and learning. Research suggests that integrating writing into disciplinary learning contexts can promote critical thinking and deep learning (Bean, 2011). Taking this as its starting point, this pilot project, a cross-disciplinary collaboration between a writing specialist and two design instructors, sought to integrate discipline-specific writing activities into design studio pedagogy. The project’s preliminary findings suggest that these writing tasks supported first-years’ iterative reflective processes and skills development, providing them with the means and opportunities to challenge habits of mind and engage critically with their work, both on their own and in the studio classroom. The poster will also highlight the ways in which the collaborative assignment design process was itself iterative, fostering reflective teaching practice among academic support staff and discipline-specific faculty. 

References: 

Bean, J.C. (2011). Engaging ideas: The professor’s guide to integrating writing, critical thinking, and active learning in the classroom, 2nd edition. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Cranton, P. (2006). Understanding and promoting transformative learning: a guide for educators of adults, 2nd edition. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Mezirow, J. (2003).Transformative Learning as Discourse. Journal of Transformative Education 1(1), 58-63.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.26 - Peer feedback on writing: Is more better? A pilot study
A good deal of SoTL literature shows that engaging in peer feedback can help improve student writing (e.g., Topping, 1998; Cho & MacArthur, 2010; Cho & Cho, 2011; Crossman & Kite, 2012). Still, there are some gaps in the literature. First, most studies published on this topic consider the effect of peer feedback on revisions to a single essay, rather than on whether students use peer comments on one essay when writing another essay. In addition, there is little in the literature about a “dose-response” curve: is peer feedback more effective in improving writing after a certain number of such activities, and/or are there diminishing returns after quite a few sessions? We designed a study to address these gaps by linking the comments given and received on essays to how students change their writing on later essays, in a course in which students write 12 essays over a year and engage in one hour of peer feedback every week. In this poster we report on a pilot study with one section of this course during 2013-2014. We collected all essays and peer comments from the participants in the study, as well as comments by the instructor on those essays. We have coded the peer comments and are in the process of coding instructor comments and the essays themselves. The poster will show our research design, data collection methods, and plan for data analysis for this very complex study with a large amount of qualitative data.

Cho, K., & MacArthur, C. (2010). Student revision with peer and expert reviewing. Learning and Instruction, 20(4), 328–338. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2009.08.006

Cho, Y. H., & Cho, K. (2010). Peer reviewers learn from giving comments. Instructional Science, 39(5), 629–643. http://doi.org/10.1007/s11251-010-9146-1

Crossman, J. M., & Kite, S. L. (2012). Facilitating improved writing among students through directed peer review. Active Learning in Higher Education, 13(3), 219–229. http://doi.org/10.1177/1469787412452980

Topping, K. (1998). Peer Assessment Between Students in Colleges and Universities. Review of Educational Research, 68(3), 249–276. http://doi.org/10.3102/00346543068003249

Speakers
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching in Philosophy, Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver
Philosophy, OER, open textbooks, open pedagogy, accessibility


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.27 - Reflecting on diagnostic errors: Taking a second look is not enough
It is generally accepted that human reasoning is consistent with a “dual process” model and that cognitive errors are associated with a rapid, non-analytical “System 1” process (Kahneman, 2012). Reflective practice (Schön, 1983) on the other hand is associated with analytical thinking (System 2) and is generally assumed to result in fewer errors (Mamede et al. 2004, 2007). This dual-process model, made popular by Daniel Kahneman has been highly influential in medical education and several authors recommend higher education interventions that help medical residents identify cognitive biases and encourage analytic thought (Croskerry, 2003). A series of experiments investigated several key assumptions of the cognitive biases approach to medical reasoning, demonstrating that diagnostic accuracy is not affected by instruction in generalizable reasoning strategies (Monteiro et al. 2015; Norman et al. 2014.; Sherbino et al., 2014; Sherbino et al., 2012). In one study, participants instructed to be more careful and analytic were not significantly more accurate (45%) than participants instructed to diagnose quickly (44.5%) (Norman et al., 2014). In another study, revising a previous incorrect diagnosis resulted in a small benefit, increasing accuracy from 32% to 45% (p< 0.05) for revised diagnoses (Monteiro et al.). However diagnoses that were not revised were far more accurate (62.5%). We will discuss the results of these studies in the context of reflective practice in higher education more broadly. 

1. Kahneman, D. (2011). Thinking. Fast and Slow, Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

2. Norman, G., Sherbino, J., Dore, K., Wood, T., Young, M., Gaissmaier, W., ... & Monteiro, S. (2014). The etiology of diagnostic errors: a controlled trial of system 1 versus system 2 reasoning. Academic Medicine, 89(2), 277-284.

3. Monteiro, S.D., Sherbino, J., Patel, A., Mazzetti, I., Norman, G. and Howey E. Reflecting on diagnostic errors: Taking a second look is not enough. Journal of General Internal Medicine. In Press.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.28 - SoTL snakes and ladders: Variations on a theme
This poster outlines results from an in-depth study at one Ontario institution that explored how academics develop an identity as scholars of teaching and learning. Each of these persons works in a different discipline; they represent diverse backgrounds, and yet, there are similarities in their accounts, particularly around the supports from which they have benefited and the challenges they have encountered. These themes will be compared to the results of two larger studies: Wuetherick, Yu, and Greer’s (in press) overview of SoTL work at the University of Saskatchewan and Poole and Simmons’ (2013) international study to engage you in building a comparative example of the major themes. You will be invited to interact with the poster by helping create a snakes and ladders game, responding to the original study questions: 1) What draws you to this work? 2) What supports you in this work? 3) What challenges you in this work? 4) What could support you further? and 5) What are the outcomes of this work? Your participation will give you an opportunity to consider and discuss how obstacles to SoTL might be overcome and SoTL supports enhanced in your own setting. The intention is to have you play further variations on the theme at your own institution. 

References:

Poole, G., & Simmons, N. (2013). The contributions of the scholarship of teaching and learning to quality enhancement in Canada. In G. Gordon, & R. Land (Eds.), Quality enhancement in higher education: International perspectives (pp. 118-128). London: Routledge.

Wuetherick, B., Yu, S., & Greer, J. (in press). Exploring the SoTL landscape at the university of Saskatchewan. In N. Simmons (Ed.), The scholarship of teaching and learning in Canada: Institutional impact. New Directions in Teaching and Learning.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.29 - Teaching team work skills to undergraduate students: How many teaching strategies do you use?
Teams perform best in achieving their shared goals when individuals within the team have both the necessary discipline knowledge and the skills to engage effectively in the process of teamwork (Hughes & Jones, 2011). Employers want graduates who not only have the required technical knowledge and skills, but have also developed ‘soft skills’ like teamwork (Hood et al., 2013). Teaching and assessing teamwork skills is difficult, usually not done well or not done at all (Hughes & Jones, 2011). There is a growing body of literature on the development of teamwork skills, although there is little evidence in the literature that teamwork skills have been systematically taught or assessed in the health professions. Since the focus on teaching and assessing teamwork skills is relatively new and resources are only beginning to emerge, it is reasonable to assume that academics themselves do not necessarily have well developed teamwork skills nor strategies to cultivate such skills in their students. What is lacking in the literature is evidence of how critical reflection influences how academics teach and assess teamwork skills. Multidisciplinary researchers from health sciences investigated how academics teach and assess teamwork skills. Critical self-reflection was a valuable strategy for academics to improve how they teach and assess teamwork skills. Key recommendations for academics actively teaching and assessing teamwork skills include integrating teamwork skills into the curriculum and allowing time for students to develop their skills across the curriculum. Strategies for developing effective teamwork skills included specific training about teamwork dynamics, conflict management and critical self-reflection. Findings from the study add to the evidence that critical reflection enhances team work teaching. 

References:

Hood, K., Cant, R., Baulch, J., Gilbee, A., Leech, M., Anderson, A., & Davies, K. (2013). Prior experience of interprofessional learning enhances undergraduate nursing and healthcare students' professional identity and attitudes to teamwork. Nurse Education in Practice, 14(2), 1-617-122. doi: 10.1016/j.nepr.2013.07.013

Hughes, R.L., & Jones, S. K. (2011). Developing and assessing college student teamwork skills. New Directions for Institutional Research, 2011(149), 53-64. doi: 10.1002/ir.380



Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.30 - The impact of practice on graduate students’ confidence to give a lecture
In this poster session, we will present findings from a study conducted at the University of Guelph that measured changes in graduate students’ confidence to lecture after delivering a practice lecture and providing/receiving feedback. Participants can expect to identify ways to nurture instructor self-confidence in teaching and to reflect on the role of confidence in their own teaching practice. Teaching workshops are one of the most common forms of professional development for teaching assistants at institutions across Canada. Yet research has suggested that workshops have limited long-term impact on teaching behaviour and attitudes, and student learning (Prieto & Meyers, 2001). With an interest in improving the efficacy of teaching workshops in improving teaching attitudes, and building on Boman’s work (2013), we designed this study to explore the relationship between practice lecturing and graduate student confidence to give a lecture. Our specific research question was “What impact, if any, does practice have on graduate students’ confidence to give a lecture?” Following from this question, we asked “Should practice be incorporated into graduate student teaching development workshops?” Our poster will not only present findings from this study, but will actively engage poster viewers through dialogue with presenters and the poster itself in considering opportunities for incorporating practice in their own experience as educators and life-long learners. 

References:

Boman, J. (2013). Graduate student teaching development: Evaluating the effectiveness of training in relation to graduate student characteristics. Canadian Journal of Higher Education 43(1): 100-114.

Boman, J. (2008). Outcomes of a graduate teaching assistant training program (Ph.D. Dissertation). The University of Western Ontario, Canada.

Prieto, L. R., & Meyers, S. (2001). The teaching assistant training handbook: How to prepare TAs for their responsibilities. Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press.

Speakers
avatar for Meagan Troop (University of Guelph)

Meagan Troop (University of Guelph)

Curriculum Consultant for the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation, University of Guelph


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.31 - The impact of processing skills on students’ use of research resources
Interdisciplinary, active-learning First-Year Seminars increase students’ processing skills (e.g., reading critically, conducting independent research) (Murray & Summerlee, 2007) and long-term grade-point averages (Summerlee & Murray, 2010). This interactive session will explore the association between students’ processing skills and use of different research resources. A total of 1256 students enrolled in a First-Year Seminar between Fall 2011 and Winter 2014 completed anonymous paper-and-pen questionnaires at semester end to assess their frequency of using different research resources and level of processing skills. More frequent use of scholarly articles was associated with greater skills conducting independent research, reading critically, using a variety of resources, and using the library. Students who less frequently relied on their instructor or teaching assistants reported better collaboration skills and comfort with independent research. Students who less frequently used the Internet as a research resource reported greater skills using the library and a variety of sources. Students less skilled at using a variety of sources more commonly used Wikipedia. This session will allow participants to engage in a discussion with each other and the presenters on how to foster students’ collaboration and critical reading skills along with savvy navigation of library systems as a means to increase the quality of students’ research resource reliance. This session is particularly relevant to instructors, librarians, and others working with first-year students, but may also be of interest to those focused on improving research skills and resource use for students at all levels.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.32 - Using easily accessible aggregate LMS and SEoT data to evaluate learning design, learner engagement and perceived course value
Learning analytics research may allow higher education to make better use of ‘big educational data’ for learning design (Ferguson, 2012; Lockyer et al., 2013). In this exploratory study we have brought together several sets of data from our institution to examine whether aggregated course-level data can be used to assess the relationships between different elements of course engagement: course and assessment structure, student online activity, and perceived course value. We explored aggregate course-level data (Learning Management System data and course evaluation (SEoT) data (Marsh, 2007)) from 26 online courses, rather than individual learner data, with the goal of discovering approaches that may be generalizable across higher education institutions, while avoiding use of sensitive personal information. Our preliminary results indicate that online courses in which students spend more time on peer interaction activities (mainly the discussion forum) receive higher evaluation scores, while the relationship between time spent on course content pages and perceived value is not as clear. Having an emphasis on effort-based assessments, on the other hand, and organizing course materials into modules, is associated with higher perceived value. This work demonstrates the value of pooled, easily accessible, and anonymous data for high-level inferences regarding learning in online courses. Specifically, our analysis suggests that courses whose activities and assessments are more demanding of learner time are, in fact, associated with increased perceived value, especially when students use their time in the course to interact with peers. Results also show that course structure can contribute to productive interactions, but not as simply as one would think. _x000D_
_x000D_
Ferguson, R. (2012). Learning analytics: Drivers, developments and challenges. International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 4(5/6), 304–317._x000D_
_x000D_
Marsh, H. W. (2007). Students’ Evaluations of University Teaching: Dimensionality, Reliability, Validity, Potential Biases and Usefulness. In R. P. Perry & J. C. Smart (Eds.) The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Evidence-Based Perspective (pp319-383). Springer Netherlands._x000D_
_x000D_
Lockyer, L., Heathcote, E., & Dawson, S. (2013). Informing pedagogical action: Aligning learning analytics with learning design. American Behavioral Scientist, 57(10), 1439-1459. doi:10.1177/000276421347936

Speakers
avatar for Ido Roll

Ido Roll

Director, Institute for Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, University of British Columbia
Technology can Help folks be eager learners Fruitful in context


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.33 - Effectiveness of collaborative group work in a first-year Health Sciences course
Group work is frequently used to promote collaboration skills and critical thinking in post-secondary education (Kågesten & Engelbrecht, 2007). The value of group work is well established in professional education and senior level courses in a variety of disciplines; this study examines the group work experience in a first-year undergraduate setting (Bourner et al., 2001; Brown & McIlroy, 2011; Pauli et al., 2008). First year students are unique in that they are just beginning to build conceptual foundations and may lack the confidence in their knowledge base to fully engage in active learning activities for fear of being judged as “not smart”. This poster presentation will outline the findings of a study undertaken to investigate the effect of group work on student learning experience and course outcomes in a first year health sciences course. Specifically, students completed a modified Student Feedback on Group Work questionnaire (SFGWQ) after the completion of a group Journal Club group presentation (Bourner et al., 2001). Overall, students reported a positive learning experience as a result of the group project (82%), and data suggests that this group project contributed to building important collaboration skills; particularly working with others, planning, and time management. 95% of students also reported that the group project helped improve their critical thinking skills. This poster presentation will highlight the benefits and challenges of using group work and tips on how to structure group work to promote a positive learning experience. _x000D_
_x000D_
Bourner, J., Hughes, M., & Bourner, T. (2001). First-year Undergraduate Experiences of Group Project Work. [Article]. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 26(1), 19-39. doi: 10.1080/02602930020022264_x000D_
_x000D_
Brown, C. A., & McIlroy, K. (2011). Group work in healthcare students' education: what do we think we are doing? [Article]. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 36(6), 687-699. doi: 10.1080/02602938.2010.483275_x000D_
_x000D_
Kågesten, O., & Engelbrecht, J. (2007). Student group presentations: a learning instrument in undergraduate mathematics for engineering students. [Article]. European Journal of Engineering Education, 32(3), 303-314. doi: 10.1080/03043790701276833_x000D_
_x000D_
Pauli, R., Mohiyeddini, C., Bray, D., Michie, F., & Street, B. (2008). Individual differences in negative group work experiences in collaborative student learning. [Article]. Educational Psychology, 28(1), 47-58. doi: 10.1080/01443410701413746

Lead Speaker(s)
FA

Fabiola Aparicio-Ting (University of Calgary)

Assistant Director, Health & Society, BHSc program; Instructor, Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary

Speakers

Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.34 - Electronic portfolio assessment: Developing a rubric for student evaluation in a course setting at the undergraduate level
An electronic portfolio (ePortfolio), known at McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario) as the Learning Portfolio, is an online platform for students to organize content to help reflect on and learn from their experiences. Students can include multimedia, such as documents, graphics, and audio files. ePortfolios can be used as an educational tool to support deep learning (Gambino, 2014). Following a review of the literature, Eynon et al. (2014) concluded that: “ePortfolio helps students to construct purposeful identities as learners” (p. 98). Furthermore, ePortfolios are useful in enhancing meaningful learning of curricular (Chang, 2001) and co-curricular content (Brown, 2002). One challenge in the use of ePortfolios is objective assessment in light of the often-subjective nature of artifacts. Since each student, and their learning experience, is unique, the style and content of their portfolios could vary widely. Despite this diversity, students must be assessed using an objective scale. We have developed a rubric to address this need. Our rubric evaluates ePortfolio content on four components: reflections, artifacts, writing mechanics, and professionalism. Reflection assessment includes students viewing their learning experience through a variety of “lenses”: the self lens, a reflection of their personal development; the binoculars, a reflection of their academic and professional development; and the social lens, a reflection of how the educational experience can benefit others on a societal level. Other components evaluate presentation and layout, use of multimedia, and general clarity in meaning and writing. As ePortfolios play a larger role in the post-secondary learning process, finding effective assessment strategies will become increasingly important for successful incorporation into course design and implementation.

Brown, J. O. (2002). Know thyself: The impact of portfolio development on adult learning. Adult Education Quarterly, 52(3), 228-245. doi:10.1177/0741713602052003005

Chang, C. (2001). Construction and evaluation of a web-based learning portfolio system: An electronic assessment tool. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 38(2), 144-155. doi: 10.1080/13558000010030194

Eynon, B., Gambino, L., Torok, J. (2014). What Difference Can ePortfolio Make? A Field Report from the Connect to Learning Project. International Journal of ePortfolio, 4(1), 95-114. Retrieved from http://www.theijep.com/pdf/IJEP127.pdf

Gambino, L. M. (2014). Putting E-Portfolios at the center of our learning. Peer Review, 16(1), 1-8. Retrieved from http://www.niu.edu/p20network/readiness-activities/ePortfolio-materials/Gambino-Peer-Review-2014.pdf


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.36 - Examining changes in faculty teaching and sustainability of changes after professional development
This paper examines the relationship among changes in faculty conceptions, approaches, and practices of teaching after professional development, employing a mixed-method approach, with interviews, surveys, and classroom observations, to triangulate the relationship among faculty conceptions, approaches, and practices of teaching. Conceptions are examined with a semi-structured interview protocol designed to explore participants’ understanding of teaching (Light 2008). The Approaches to Teaching Inventory, a Likert-scale instrument, is used to measure approaches (Trigwell 2004). Instructional practices are analyzed by coding video recordings of classroom sessions with a protocol that tracks observable instructor and student activities in defined time intervals (Smith 2013). Interviews and classroom observations are coded by at least two raters, with inter-rater agreement at greater than 0.7 and 0.8 respectively. Three case studies are chosen because of their different patterns of changes in conceptions of teaching. Two observations emerge from these case studies. First, conceptions of teaching inform instructional practices, whereas approaches can be disconnected. From our data, the three instructors have similar approaches but different conceptions, and their instructional practices have observable differences informed by their conceptions. Second, sustainable changes in practices may be associated with changes in conceptions. One instructor, whose conception did not change, attempted new instructional practices but reverted to transmission-based practices in the second implementation of the course. The other two instructors, who developed acquisition-based and conceptual-change conceptions, sustained their new practices._x000D_
_x000D_
Light G, Calkins S (2008). The experience of faculty development: Patterns of variation in conceptions of teaching. International Journal for Academic Development 13: 27-40._x000D_
Smith MK, Jones FHM, Gilbert SL, Wieman CE (2013). The classroom observation protocol for undergraduate STEM (COPUS): A new instrument to characterize university STEM classroom practices. CBE Life Sciences Education 12: 618-627._x000D_
Trigwell K, Prosser M (2004). Development and use of the approaches to teaching inventory. Educational Psychology Review 16: 409-424.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.37 - Observing TAs’ teaching: Improving practice
Peer teaching observations between graduate students is not a widely adopted practice. This poster will demonstrate how observations conducted by peer mentors observing new TAs were an effective way to provide formative feedback, build confidence and promote professional development. Contributors, experienced TAs and one faculty mentor, identify many aspects associated with conducting teaching observations, such as: 1) introducing new graduate students to this “situated act” (Edgerton, 1991) as academic best practice; 2) that observing does not occur only in the classroom; 3) how kinds of changes – technical, pedagogical, and critical (Bell, 2001) – were required, prevalent, or surprising; and 4) how the initial observation led to new TAs working towards refining aspects of their teaching practice. Suggestions for preparing TAs for teaching observations, including observation protocols and relationship building, are discussed, as well as questions to prompt viewer dialogue. Several handouts will be provided. These will include: observation protocol forms used by contributors, relevant resources to help begin a TA peer observation program.

Bell, M. (2001). Supported reflective practice: a programme of peer observation and feedback for academic development. International Journal for Academic Development, 6 (1) 29-39.

Edgerton, R. (1991). The teaching portfolio as a display of best work. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Higher Education, Washington, DC.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.38 - Prevalence of academic misconduct on written tests: How to measure it and how to stop it!
Self-reports suggest over 50% of Canadian university students cheat at some point in their academic career (Christensen Hughes & McCabe, 2006). A recent survey suggests only a small number of students are punished for cheating, and true values of academic misconduct (AM) are difficult to obtain (Moore, 2014). We had a concern that students were performing AM by altering written tests and resubmitting them for higher grades; thereby compromising the integrity of our current assessment style. Therefore, we objectively quantified the prevalence of AM on written tests in 11 senior courses. All student midterms were scanned and any midterm submitted for re-grading was compared to its original for evidence of AM. Student characteristics, test details, and course information were also recorded. Results show that this form of AM was rare; prevalent on


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.39 - Tuning into practice: Engaging entry-to-practice doctor of pharmacy students using simulation in a physical assessment course
The shift in pharmacy practice to a more advanced role has necessitated the restructuring of programs and course material that include opportunities for students to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in topics such as communication, physical assessment and clinical decision-making (Frankel, Louizos, & Austin, 2014). This shift has provided increased opportunities for the inclusion of innovative educational technologies allowing students to practice clinical skills in a safe environment._x000D_
This poster will describe the evolution of a physical assessment course for students enrolled in an entry-to-practice Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program with an emphasis on the use of simulation in the laboratory component. Observation and course evaluation data suggested that the original delivery methods of lecture followed by practice of assessment in the lab be reworked to better reflect the needs of students in a pharmacy program._x000D_
Conference participants will see examples of techniques used in the course and will be encouraged to share their experiences with the use of simulation._x000D_
Emerging evidence supports the use of simulation in pharmacy education and may include techniques such as role play, case study examples and use of human patient simulators (Skoy, Eukel, & Frenzel, 2013; Vyas, Bray, & Wilson, 2013). Opportunities for students to engage with the course material through the use of case examples and simulation were initiated in every lab. Student feedback was elicited through weekly and course evaluations. Including simulation as part of a physical assessment course may increase student engagement and support a positive impact on future clinical practice.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.40 - Evidence-based recommendations to improve the accuracy of peer-evaluation of written assignments.
Peer-evaluation is used frequently in higher education, as both a supplement to instructor grading (Sho, Schunn & Charney, 2006), and as a replacement to instructor grading (Harris, 2011). Many factors likely contribute to the success of any peer-review activity (skill level, number of assessments etc.), however these are not well defined (Topping, 2010). The accuracy and reliability of peer-evaluations is an important consideration, as research has shown examples at both ends of the spectrum (Sho et al., 2006, Yankulov & Couto, 2012). The objective of this study was to systematically determine which factors (course, assignment and student related) have the strongest influence on the accuracy of peer-assessment. We identified 17 variables and ranked their correlations with accuracy and reliability across three courses from different disciplines that used peer-assessment on written assignments (research proposals, term papers) over four years (>1000 peer-reviews). We then altered the single most significant variable in one course to confirm our prediction. We demonstrate that the number of reviews completed per reviewer has the greatest influence on the accuracy of peer-assessment. Our calculations suggest that six reviews must be completed per reviewer to achieve quantitative peer assessment that is no different from the instructor. Effective training, previous experience and strong academic abilities in the reviewers may reduce this number. This poster will provide evidence based suggestions for instructors to encourage accurate peer-evaluations in their classrooms. Importantly, it will also indentify factors that don’t seem to influence the success of peer-evaluation, allowing flexibility for instructors._x000D_
_x000D_
References:_x000D_
1. Cho, K., Schunn, C. D., & Charney, D. (2006). Commenting on writing: typology and perceived helpfulness of comments from novice peer reviewers and subject matter experts. Written Communication 23 (3), 260-294._x000D_
2. Harris, J. R. (2011). Peer assessment in large undergraduate classes: and evaluation of a procedure for marking laboratory reports and a review of related practices. Advances in Physiology Education 35, 178-187._x000D_
3. Topping, K. J. (2010). Methodological quandaries in studying process and outcomes in peer assessment. Learning and Instruction 20, 339-343._x000D_
4. Yankulov K, Couto R. (2012). Peer Review in Class: Metrics and Variations in a Senior Course. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, 40 (3), 161-168.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.41 - Using PhotoVoice to learn about complexity and interconnectedness in the context of social inequity and health.
Students studying Health Sciences are often required to take courses that focus on the role that social inequalities play in impacting health. This includes issues related to social structures, culture, and history, such as poverty and oppression. These courses aim to prepare students to understand that both individual and population health are impacted by a range of intersecting social, environmental, and biophysical factors. The interaction between such an array of health determinants makes this a complex issue to learn about, particularly in large undergraduate classes where student engagement and discussion can be difficult to elicit (Hanover Research, 2010; Valerien, 1991). This poster describes the development of a PhotoVoice assignment: a novel method of analysis which uses photography to represent and express points of view and lived realities. PhotoVoice has been used in a variety of university classroom settings (Chandler & Baldwin, 2010; Cook & Rust, 2013). This project was developed to test if a more experiential approach supported student learning outcomes and assisted students in understanding the interconnectedness of the topic. Findings from survey data and focus groups will be outlined on the poster. Participants will also be able to interact with the poster using a QR Code that will take their cell or tablet to a website that contains more information about the project and examples of student work._x000D_
_x000D_
Learning outcomes:_x000D_
• Understand how PhotoVoice can transition students from an individual to a social perspective._x000D_
• Access resources so that participants can explore these methods in their own practice._x000D_
_x000D_
References:_x000D_
_x000D_
Chandler, L., & Baldwin, C. (2010). Views from the Water’s Edge: The Impact of Images in Communicating Perspectives of Climate Change. In M. Raesch (Ed.), Mapping Minds, pp. 95-106. Oxford, UK: Interdisciplinary Press._x000D_
Cook, K., & Rust, C. (2013). Connecting to Our Community: Utilizing PhotoVoice as a Pedagogical Tool to Connect College Students to Science. International Journal of Environmental & Science Education, 8(2), 339–357._x000D_
Hanover Research. (2010). Strategies for Teaching Large Undergraduate Classes. Retrieved January 22, 2015 from https://www.baruch.cuny.edu/facultyhandbook/documents/LargeClasses_StrategiesforTeaching.pdf_x000D_
Valerien, J. (1991). Innovations for Large Classes: A Guide for Teachers and Administrators. Paris: UNESCO.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.42 - Understanding the curve: Implications of norm-referenced grading in large introductory science courses
Curving grades in introductory science courses is a common practice, with approximately half of chemistry and physics professors and one-quarter of biology professors reporting that they grade on a curve (Goubeaud, 2010). Proponents argue curving accounts for changes in the difficulty of exams, guards against grade inflation, and is a tool for ranking students and evaluating potential for graduate school (Sadler, 2005). However, critics argue that curving grades does not provide a valid measure of the degree of content mastery (Goubeaud, 2010). Despite the contentious debate over whether curving student grades is a valid assessment strategy, little empirical research has examined this practice. We will present the results of our study which examined the effects of curving introductory chemistry grades at a large, four-year university using data from over 16,000 students enrolled between 2008 and 2013. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to model students’ chemistry course grades as function of individual- and class-level characteristics. Results indicate that students’ grades were associated not only with their own prior achievement, but also with the prior achievement of students in their class. Being in a class with students who scored higher on the SAT and chemistry placement exam was associated with a decrease in student grades. This suggests that, as a result of curving, student grades are not representative of their own competency.Because the distribution of students varies substantially across classes, curving artificially deflates students’ grades in higher-achieving classes and inflates grades in lower-achieving classes. 

Goubeaud, K. (2010). How is science learning assessed at the postsecondary level? Assessment and grading practices in college biology, chemistry and physics. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 19(3), 237-245.

Sadler, D. R. (2005). Interpretations of criteria‐based assessment and grading in higher education. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 30(2), 175-194.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer

4:00pm PDT

POSTER.43 - You can’t change what you can’t measure: Measuring teaching practices and student learning to promote improvement in introductory science classes
In order improve, we have to be able to measure, but measurement in introductory science courses has often been limited to examinations designed for grading purposes and course evaluations to assess instructor effectiveness. The data from these measures do not provide the comprehensive understanding of student learning and pedagogy that is needed to promote change and improve student learning. We have expanded assessment efforts in introductory science courses at a large 4-year institution to focus on students’ conceptual understanding of course material, students’ mindsets, pedagogical approaches, and classroom interactions. Conceptual understanding is measured through assessments that are aligned with individual course learning goals. Student mindsets are assessed using the C-LASS (Adams et al., 2006) to assess the extent of expert thinking. Finally, pedagogical approaches and classroom interactions are measured using the General Observation and Reflection Tool, an application to record observations and reflections related to learning activities (Smith et al., 2013). Measures are implemented throughout the course in order to assess outcomes and quantify change. The triangulation of these instruments, in conjunction with regular classroom assessments, student characteristics and prior achievement provide a thorough picture of course instruction and student learning. This allows instructors and departments to measure change and make evidence-based decisions. We will present an overview of the tools and assessment strategies that have been used to measure student learning and pedagogical approaches at our institution, and how these measures have promoted change. 

Adams, W. K., Perkins, K. K., Podolefsky, N. S., Dubson, M., Finkelstein, N. D., & Wieman, C. E. (2006). New instrument for measuring student beliefs about physics and learning physics: The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey. Physical Review Special Topics-Physics Education Research, 2(1), 010101.

Smith, M. K., Jones, F. H., Gilbert, S. L., & Wieman, C. E. (2013). The classroom observation protocol for undergraduate STEM (COPUS): a new instrument to characterize university STEM classroom practices. CBE-Life Sciences Education, 12(4), 618-627.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Bayshore Foyer