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Achieving Harmony: Tuning into Practice

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Wednesday, June 17
 

1:45pm PDT

CON03.06 - A meaningful plan: Using a “portfolio of practice” approach to strategic planning in higher education
Strategic planning has become common practice at universities. Most strategic planning processes, however, are adopted from corporate domains (Ellis, 2010)—with little research evidence to support the efficacy of these models within post-secondary environments. Furthermore, teaching and learning centers have often been at the periphery of centralized strategic planning processes (Gibbs, 2006). Such centers may now find themselves facing requirements to engage in strategic planning without the benefit of established processes that adequately fit their contexts and purposes. The Educational Development Unit at the University of Calgary engaged in a process that explicitly merged collaborative strategic planning techniques, current higher education research (Mueller, 2015), and wisdom of practice (Weimer, 2001) in order to create a living strategic plan. This portfolio of practice approach allows us to reflect on and document our educational development beliefs and practices in an inclusive and collaborative manner, while also creating a research-informed and contextually-driven strategic plan. By the end of this interactive session, participants should be able to: (a) evaluate the portfolio of practice strategic planning model, and (b) adapt components of the model to meet their own institutional contexts. The presenters will provide an overview of the strategic planning process that has been implemented at the Educational Development Unit. Paired and small group discussion will be used to generate ideas about how such a process might be used at participants’ home institutions. The session will conclude with an open-group debrief to critically evaluate this strategic planning approach. 


Ellis, S. E. (2010). Introduction to strategic planning in student affairs: A model for process and elements of a plan. New Directions for Student Services, 132, 5-16. doi: 0.1002/ss.371

Gibbs, G. (2006). Supporting educational development within departments. International Journal for Academic Development, 1(1), 27-37. doi: 10.1080/1360144960010104

Mueller, R. (2015). Do values drive the plan? Investigating the nature and role of organizational values in university strategic planning. Tertiary Education and Management, 21(1). doi: 10.1080/13583883.2014.998270

Weimer, M. (2001). Learning more from the wisdom of practice. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 86, 45-56. doi: 10.1002/tl.15

Speakers
avatar for Robin Alison Mueller (University of Calgary)

Robin Alison Mueller (University of Calgary)

Educational Development Consultant (Faculty), University of Calgary
avatar for Natasha Kenny

Natasha Kenny

Natasha Kenny is Director of the Educational Development Unit in the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning at the University of Calgary


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Thompson Room

1:45pm PDT

CON03.08 - Incorporating active listening into day to day practices of educational development

Active listening has been defined as a state of hearing the other person, avoiding premature judgment, reflecting understanding, clarifying information, summarizing, and sharing (Hoppe, 2011). Active listening is considered a critical communication skill in administrative, leadership and management as well as in a variety of occupational and therapeutic fields (Hoppe, 2011; Romero et al., 2001; Slizewski, 1995; Weger, et al., 2014). However there is no research that addresses active listening within an Educational Development context. As Educational developers we engage in consultation, needs assessment, workshop and program design and facilitation, program coordination, program evaluation, and variety of other processes all of which rely heavily on the practice of active listening skills. Although active listening is highly valued, it is often deprioritized when in competition with other components of educational development processes (facilitation, program coordination, etc.) for our attention and resources. In this 60 minute interactive workshop we will engage participants in small group, guided practice, and brainstorming activities to identify unconscious acts of self-projection during active listening, and recognize the ethical hazards involved in self-projection. Participants will develop processes of self-monitoring and work to find an appropriate ethical and practical balance between self and other when actively listening.



• Hoppe, M. H. (2011). Active listening: Improve your ability to listen and lead Pfeiffer. 

• Romero, D. B., & Ebrary Academic Complete (Canada) Subscription Collection. (2001). The business of listening: A practical guide to effective listening. Menlo Park, Calif: Crisp Learning. 

• Slizewski, P. (1995). Tips for active listening. HR Focus, 72(5), 7.

• Weger, H., Castle Bell, G., Minei, E. M., & Robinson, M. C. (2014). The relative effectiveness of active listening in initial interactions. International Journal of Listening, 28(1), 13-31. doi:10.1080/10904018.2013.813234


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Director Room

1:45pm PDT

CON03.09 - Pursuing professional pedagogical growth through peer observation of teaching: Come one, come all, come hear all about it!
Peer observation of teaching (POT) has been shown to help teachers develop new skills (Cairns, Bissell, & Bovill, 2013) and become more aware of their own teaching (O’Keefe, Lecouteur, Miller, and McGowan, 2009). There is also an apparent reciprocal benefit for both the teacher being observed and the observer. It is speculated that this process allows teachers to reflect on each other’s perspectives and learn from one another (Cairns et al., 2013). Moreover, learning appears to occur regardless of one’s level of expertise, seniority, or faculty status (Bell & Cooper, 2013). Despite POT being an internationally recognized strategy to enhance the quality of teaching and learning in higher education (McMahon, Barrett & O’Neill, 2007), it is not practiced in all institutions. A POT initiative was introduced on our campus which uses a framework of reciprocal classroom observations and reflections amongst peers. This interactive workshop will provide participants with an opportunity to reflect on and share the types of feedback they have received regarding their classroom teaching. In addition, participants will learn about the different POT models that exist in higher education, including the Peer Collaboration Network (PCN) operating at our institution. The benefits of the PCN model, as well as challenges and solutions to keep in mind when developing a similar initiative, will also be discussed. Through this discussion participants will take away the value of POT as a means of engaging in on-going professional pedagogical growth and fine-tuning educational practice. 

Bell, M., & Cooper, P. (2013). Peer observation of teaching university departments: A framework for implementation. International Journal for Academic Development, 18(1), 60-73.

Cairns, A. M., Bissell, V., & Bovill, C. (2013). Evaluation of a pilot peer observation of teaching scheme for chair-side tutors at Glasgow University dental school. British Dental Journal, 214(11), 573-576.

McMahon, T., Barrett, T., & O’Neill, G. (2007). Using observation of teaching to improve quality: Finding your way through the muddle of competing conceptions, confusion of practice and mutually exclusive intentions. Teaching in Higher Education, 12(4), 499-511.

O’Keefe, M., Lecouteur, A., Miller, J., & McGowan, U. (2009). The colleague development program: A multidisciplinary program of peer observation partnerships. Medical Teacher, 31(12), 1060-1065.

Lead Speaker(s)
avatar for Judy AK Bornais

Judy AK Bornais

Experiential Learning Specialist, Teaching Leadership Chair, University of Windsor
Judy Bornais is currently an Experiential Learning Specialist with the Faculty of Nursing. She feels that teaching has been at the core of her work as a practitioner and academic. Teaching nursing students appealed to Judy as an opportunity to make a broader contribution to health... Read More →

Speakers

Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Salon 1

1:45pm PDT

CON03.11 - Taking your teaching beyond your classroom: Teaching practice and educational leadership
Educational leadership includes extending the reach and impact of teaching beyond the classroom (The University of British Columbia, 2014). The objective of this panel is to offer examples of educational leadership to inspire reflection, dialogue and action (Cunningham & Cordeiro, 2006). In what ways can faculty, graduate students and instructional development staff extend their teaching practices beyond their current courses and classrooms through educational leadership (Carr, 2014)? Following an introduction to educational leadership as conceptualized at University of British Columbia, the panel will present examples of student-centered educational leadership initiatives undertaken by University of British Columbia faculty that produce significant impacts on student learning and teaching careers. The panel will support the conference theme “Achieving harmony: Tuning into practice” by providing examples of how teaching practice and educational leadership approaches can be combined to spark teaching collaboration among faculty and extend their teaching practices beyond their typical professional contexts. Panelists will highlight how students, teachers, and educational institutions can benefit from these forms of educational leadership. In this session, participants will:

• Explore the diverse experiences of teachers who have pursued educational leadership initiatives that extended their teaching practice across a wide range of interdisciplinary, institutional, and student learning environments;

• Share their own teaching practices with other session participants and collaboratively identify potential educational leadership opportunities to extend their teaching practices beyond their courses and classrooms;

• Identify and share with session participants one or more concrete examples of teaching initiatives that could make a significant impact on teaching and learning at their own institutions.


Carr, W. (2014). Teaching and learning beyond the classroom. Education Canada, 54(4), 24-27.

Cunningham, W. G., & Cordeiro, P. A. (2006). Educational leadership: A problem-based approach. Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.

The University of British Columbia. (2014). Guide to reappointment, promotion, and tenure procedures at University of British Columbia 2014/2015. Vancouver, B.C.: The University of British Columbia.

Speakers
avatar for Joanne Fox (University of British Columbia)

Joanne Fox (University of British Columbia)

Principal, Professor of Teaching, UBC Vantage College; Michael Smith Laboratories and Dept of Microbiology and Immunology
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching in Philosophy, Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver
Philosophy, OER, open textbooks, open pedagogy, accessibility
avatar for Catherine Rawn

Catherine Rawn

University of British Columbia



Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Salon 3

1:45pm PDT

CON03.03 - Cohort-building and enabling risk and growth
In the IASK Program (Integrated Analytical Skills and Knowledge), students enroll in six integrated, thematic, interdisciplinary courses that aim to foster complex evaluativistic epistemological beliefs (Brownlee 2009) in a cohort-based learning environment. Pizzolato (2008) found that students often “short circuit” their own learning, refusing risk in favour of “getting a grade.” One of IASK’s goals is to intervene in this process by fostering a greater willingness to take intellectual risk. A strong, mutually supportive student cohort is crucial and demands that attention be paid to both “heart and head,” the linking of affective emotional stances to “availing” (Muis 2004) attitudes toward learning and knowledge. We begin this workshop with an interactive cohort-building exercise focused on intellectual risk. Psycho-drama activities will be used to map our relationships with risk onto both body and space to move participants from intellectual, at times anxiety driven, responses to “gut level” or intuitive understandings of complex concepts (Landy, 2003). Such exercises encourage deep learning, making space for “heart responses” emblematic of risk and vulnerability, which in turn foster group cohesion (Corey, 2011). We will conclude with a group discussion of the relationship between cohort-building and a harmonious “whole student” approach to epistemological development, asking participants to reflect on the relationship between “head and heart” in their classrooms and the practical ways that this cohesiveness might be better achieved. The workshop addresses the “Learners consideration and support” stream and contributes to the field of personal epistemology by linking theory to classroom practice for the fostering of positive learning environments.

References:

Brownlee, J., Walker, S., Lennox, S., Exley, B., & Pearce, S. (2009). The first year university experience: Using personal epistemology to understand effective learning and teaching in higher education. Higher Education, 58(5), 599-618.

Corey, G. (2000). Theory and practice of group counseling. Belmont, California: Wadsworth.

Landy, R. J. (2003). Drama Therapy with Adults. In C. E. Schaefer (Ed.) , Play Therapy with Adults (pp. 15-32). New York: J. Wiley.

Pizzolato, J. E. (2007). Meaning making inside and outside the academic arena: Investigating the contextuality of epistemological development in college students. Journal of General Education, 56, 228-251.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Bayshore Salon EF

1:45pm PDT

CON03.12 - Exploring the contextual variables and ethical ideologies that help inform decisions about everyday moral dilemmas in teaching
Educators are regularly confronted with moral dilemmas for which there are no easy solutions. Increasing course sizes and program enrolments coupled with a new consumerist attitude towards education have only further exacerbated the quantity and quality of students’ requests for special academic consideration (Macfarlane, 2004). Extensions, late submissions, and grade bumps – once rare – are now commonplace. However, there is very little in the pedagogical literature that addresses these everyday dilemmas. In a culture of transparency, unspoken policies that inform these requests are the form of learner consideration that is the least transparent to students and educators alike. This session will explore some of the variables that contribute to the complexity of these dilemmas, and the ethical ideologies that can inform their resolution. Our goal is not to provide best practices, but rather to facilitate reflection about how individuals make these decisions. Participants will be presented with fictional vignettes of real-life teaching dilemmas, and asked how they would resolve them, using clicker voting and group discussion. We will then describe the notions of relativism and idealism as two axes that define Forsyth’s (1980) four ethical ideologies, and help participants identify their own ethical ideology as it applies to teaching. Finally, we will look at centralization of academic integrity (cf. Neufeld & Dianda, 2007), and explore its parallels with issues around ethical dilemmas in teaching. With participant engagement, we will look at both sides of the debate around centralization of special academic consideration to further illustrate the inherent complexity of teaching with integrity. 

Neufeld, J., & Dianda, J. (2007). Academic dishonesty: A survey of policies and procedures at Ontario Universities. Council of Ontario Universities.

Forsyth, D. R. (1980). A taxonomy of ethical ideologies. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 39(1), 175-21.

Macfarlane, B. (2004). Teaching with integrity: The ethics of higher education practice. New York, NY: Routledge.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Cypress 1 Room

1:45pm PDT

CON03.13 - Head, heart, hands and home: A meaningful way to support students navigate choice
Students are faced with increasing pressure to “do it all”; perform well academically, get involved, give back, get career-related experience, and have a variety of meaningful learning moments. With all these pressures the burden of choice falls to the student to select from an overwhelming array of on and off campus opportunities - but which opportunities are the “right” ones?

Head, Heart, Hands and Home is a reflection model and tool that advisors can use to support students as they begin to answer their own questions of “what should I do?”  This model can be used to help students; reflect on previous experiences, make decisions about the present and plan for the future.

The Head, Heart, Hands and Home model is derived from several bodies of literature; transformational education theory, student development theory, sustainability education literature and is informed by critical, place-based and aboriginal pedagogies.  This model embraces a holistic view of the student and supports them in identifying value and making meaning from their experiences.

This interactive session will bring this model to life through meaningful reflection and purposeful conversation.  There will be a short presentation that introduces the model and frames the context and challenge.  This will be followed by a live session where attendees are facilitated in groups to work through audience generated cases.  Attendees will get a chance to apply the tool in reflective conversation and leave confident in their ability to apply it in future conversations with students.

Astin, A. (1984) "A developmental theory for higher education" Journal of College Student Personnel, 25 [4], 297–308

Gruenewald, D. A. (2003). The best of both worlds: A critical pedagogy of place. Educational Researcher, 32(4), 3-12.

Mezirow, J. (1991) Transformative Dimensions of Adult Learning. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.

Sipos, Y. Battisti, B., & Grimm, K. (2008). Achieving transformative sustainability learning: engaging head, hands and heart, International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 9(1), 68-86.



Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Cypress 2 Room

1:45pm PDT

CON03.07 - Leading change with learning spaces
Students need to be actively engaged in the classroom in order to create opportunities for meaningful, deep learning. Students are also “likely to adopt the mode of learning signaled by the existing layout and type of furniture” (JISC, 2006, p.25). Only recently has there has been an increasing focus in higher education on the transformation of the physical learning environment on campus based on what we know about how students learn (Jamieson, 2000). How does a university develop this shift towards thinking about learning spaces? Ten years ago, the Provost gave our teaching and learning centre the opportunity to lead the process of redesigning learning spaces. This decision, while historically not seen as a role for a teaching and learning centre, was seen as an opportunity to enact change across the institution. This interactive session will focus on exploring and discussing a ten-year process on how our university has changed to make learning spaces a strategic priority. Participants will reflect on and discuss the key elements of success and how it could apply to their own university teaching and learning initiatives. 

Jamieson, P., Fisher, K., Gilding, T., Taylor, P. G., & Trevitt, A.C.F. (2000). Place and space in the design of new learning environments. Higher Education Research and Development, 19(2), 221-237.

Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC). (2006). Designing spaces for effective learning: A guide to 21st Century learning space design. Retrieved from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/uploaded_documents/JISClearningspaces.pdf


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Chairman Room

1:45pm PDT

CON03.04 - How do you partner with student scholars?
Whether you are keen to engage students as partners in particular initiatives (Felten et al., 2013), or as co-inquirers who shape research, (Dunne & Zandstra, 2011) or as agents in transformative learning experiences and multiple perspectives (Cook-Sather, 2013), this session addresses several puposes.Healthy partnerships come with its challenges, including dismantling entrenched structures of authority or sharing power meaningfully (Delpish et al., 2010). Establishing partnerships is hard, and the democratizing potential of the students as change agents can sometimes be overstated (Weller et al., 2013). Last year, the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL) named enhanced student partnerships as a central goal in its strategic plan. MIIETL implemented a novel student scholar program that has grown from 16 to about 50 students. Student partners are full members of institute project teams, and involved in much of MIIETL’s core business. We provide brief perspectives from students, faculty, and staff involved in this initiative, and map these on to established models of student engagement (e.g., Healey et al.). Most of the session will be devoted to exchanging implementation strategies, successes and challenges with the audience.This session exemplifies the conference theme of Achieving Harmony, Tuning Into Practice, with a particular focus on transforming the relationships between students, faculty and staff. Participant outcomes include learning about the existing literature on students as partners, examples of several case studies that will build on that scholarship highlighting possibilities for engaging students as change agents in their own contexts.

Cook-Sather, A. (2014). Student-faculty partnership in explorations of pedagogical practice: A threshold concept in academic development. International Journal for Academic Development, 19(3), 186-198. **Note the year was wrong in the abstract. Should be (Cook-Sather 2014).

Dunne, E. & Zandstra, R. (2011). Students as Change Agents. New Ways of Engaging with Learning and Teaching in Higher Education. Bristol: HE Subject Centre for Education. Retrieved from: http://escalate.ac.uk/downloads/8247.pdf.

Felten, P., Bagg, J., Bumbry, M., Hill, J., Hornsby, K., Pratt, M., & Weller, S. (2013). A call for expanding inclusive student engagement in SOTL. Teaching and Learning Inquiry, 1(2), 63-74.

Healey, M., Flint, A., & Harrington, K. (2014) Engagement through Partnership: Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education. York: HE Academy. Retrieved from: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/engagement-through-partnership-students-partners-learning-and-teaching-higher-education

Speakers
avatar for Arshad Ahmad

Arshad Ahmad

Associate Vice-President, Teaching and Learning & Director, MIIETL, McMaster University
Dr. Arshad Ahmad is the Associate Vice-President Teaching and Learning and Director of Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL) at McMaster University. He is the Past Coordinator of the 3MNTF program and a 3M National Teaching Fellow. He is the Past... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Marquis

Elizabeth Marquis

McMaster University
Beth Marquis is an Assistant Professor in the Arts & Science Program and the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL).


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Mackenzie Room

1:45pm PDT

CON03.05 - Exploring links between learning environments and student well-being
Although campus health has traditionally been the responsibility of student services, recent literature and public health models suggest that diverse players across the institution can play a role in creating healthy campus communities in higher education (American College Health Association, 2014; Keeling, 2014; Tsouros, Dowding, Thompson & Dooris, 1998; Washburn, Teo, Knodel, & Morris, 2013). There is growing interest in in creating conditions for well-being in higher education, with particular attention to the learning environment. This session will present the results of original research exploring the links between learning environments and student well-being at a comprehensive, Canadian institution. Over 1000 student responses were collected through a participatory action research study involving 14 faculty members. The session will present the rationale for the Well-being in Learning Environments project, the process of working collaboratively with campus partners and the results, both in terms the original research conducted and resources created. The Well-being in Learning Environments project, a partnership between the Teaching and Learning Centre and Health Promotion, has garnered national and international attention and was recognized with an Innovation Award from the Canadian Association of College and University Student Services in June 2014. Participants will have an increased understanding of the links between learning environments and student well-being and how learning environments can be shaped to contribute to student well-being. In addition, participants will discuss how the research findings can be used as a catalyst for collaboration at their institution, to create conditions for well-being in learning environments.

References:

American College Health Association (2014). Healthy Campus 2020 Objectives. Retrieved from http://www.acha.org/HealthyCampus/objectives.cfm

Keeling, R. (2014). An Ethic of Care in Higher Education: Well-being and Learning. Journal of College and Character, 15(3), 141-148.

Tsouros, A., Dowding, G., Thompson, J. & Dooris, M. (1998). Health Promoting Universities: Concept, Experience and Framework for Action. World Health Organization: Geneva.

Washburn, C., Teo, S., Knoedel, R., & Morris, J. (2013). Post-Secondary Student Mental Health: A Guide to a Systemic Approach. Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) and the Canadian Association of Colleges and University Student Services (CACUSS).



Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Seymour Room

1:45pm PDT

CON03.10 - Leadership to advance scholarly teaching at post-secondary institutions
A panel of teaching centre leaders from a variety of post-secondary institutions will facilitate a discussion on academic institutional leadership and support for scholarly teaching. The aim of the session is to have an open sharing of ideas and discussion with teaching and learning leaders on creating a supportive scholarly teaching culture, mitigating research challenges (i.e. research ethics boards, supporting faculty transition to human subject research, grants/funds and “acceptance”), and connecting scholarly teaching communities with other communities provincially, nationally and internationally. This session will also focus on the multiple entry points faculty can come to being engaged in a culture of scholarly teaching at the post-secondary level. The panelists will first share the practices currently working at their institutions and then the floor will be open for participants to contribute their successful practices, ask questions and help build a collection of ideas for leaders to take back to their institutions.

Hubball, H.T., & Albon, S. (2007). Developing a Faculty Learning Community: Enhancing the Scholarship of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Practice. Journal on Excellence in College Teaching, 18(2),119-142.

Hubball, H.T., Clarke, A., & Poole, G. (2010). Ten-year Reflections on Mentoring SoTL Research in a Research-Intensive University. (Accepted). International Journal for Academic Development.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Arthur

Peter Arthur

University of British Columbia Okanagan
avatar for Stephanie Chu

Stephanie Chu

Vice Provost Teaching & Learning, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Passionate about advancing teaching and learning and related University community and culture. Imagine what we can do together!
avatar for Gary Hunt

Gary Hunt

Coordinator, Teaching and Learning Support, Thompson Rivers University
TRU
avatar for Liesel Knaack

Liesel Knaack

Director, Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning, Vancouver Island University
Liesel is the director of the Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning at VIU. The centre supports faculty and students with learning technologies, pedagogical design, online learning and scholarly teaching and learning. Liesel was formerly a K-12 teacher and Associate Professor... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Salon 2

1:45pm PDT

CON03.01 3M Welcome to My Class - Tuning into the fun in teaching – how to stop worrying and embrace creativity
"Take everything you like seriously, except yourselves." Rudyard Kipling

Worry about being taken seriously can wring the fun out of a course and stifle the creativity of teachers and learners. In this interactive workshop we will discuss our experiences of embracing creativity in our teaching across a variety of disciplines in higher education including arts, sciences and medicine. Gardner (2008, p. 162) is firm about the connection between disciplines and creativity: “… creativity goes hand in glove with disciplinary thinking”. Activation of imagination provokes learning because it is meaningful, “sticky,” and memorable (James & Brookfield, 2014). We will briefly review the literature on creativity, discussing a number of techniques for developing new approaches to teaching existing content, and providing examples of how these can be applied in the classroom using approaches described by Pink (2005) and Catmull & Wallace (2014). We will lead a discussion on how to combine unexpected elements to teach in new ways, how to find new angles on old topics and how to find ways to employ fun and creative approaches in seemingly “serious” fields. The workshop includes a live interactive exercise in creativity for the participants. Through interactive exercises and discussion, participants will generate a repertoire of ways to combine unexpected elements of creativity and play in their teaching. 

References:
1. Gardner, H. (2008). 5 Minds for the Future. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

2. James, A., & Brookfield, S. D. (2014). Engaging Imagination: Helping Students Become Creative and Reflective Thinkers. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 

3. Pink, D. H. (2005). A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future. New York, NY: Riverhead.

4. Catmull, E., & Wallace, A. (2014). Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration. New York, NY: Random House.



Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Bayshore Salon ABC

1:45pm PDT

CON03.02 - Promoting teamwork skills using peer assessment in team-based learning

Teamwork has been identified as a critical professional skill (Hughes, 2011; Kozlowski & Bell, 2003), and is a key learning outcome in undergraduate education (Biggs & Tang, 2011). Research (e.g. Biggs, 1996; Riebe, Roepen, Santarelli & Marchioro, 2010) suggests that deliberately teaching and assessing teamwork is an effective way to build teamwork skills. This workshop will model the use of concept mapping for a mini-team based activity, as a potential method for students to build a common understanding of teamwork. Participants will use our tested teamwork instrument to assess their own and others teamwork skills as demonstrated in the mini-team based activity. This method has been adopted because assessment of teamwork is often inferred from a myriad of attitudes and behaviors, and is sometimes overlooked in favour of assessing a group-based product. This complicates the student and instructor’s ability to develop and track performance of teamwork as an outcome. Identifying performance criteria and behavioral markers indicative of teamwork skills is highly valuable in building the quality of individual student contributions to a team such that targeted feedback can be provided and outcomes improved. In our research, we psychometrically tested the TeamUp rubric (Hastie, Fahy & Parratt, 2014), developed from criteria in the AAC& U teamwork Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) rubric. Peers, class facilitators and research assistants undertook measurement of individual teamwork skills. By using this tool peers were able to provide highly reliable assessment of individual teamwork skills. Furthermore, a modified version of the tool was developed based on the results of these analyses. It is assumed that development and mastery of these skills will enhance student success within the professional sector, by preparing them to be effective team members. Following the workshop activities will be a discussion of the possible application, contextual issues, and institutional implications of assessing teamwork as a desired undergraduate outcome.

References:

Biggs, J. (1996). Enhancing teaching through constructive alignment. Higher education, 32(3), 347-364.

Biggs, J., & Tang, C. (2011). Teaching for quality learning at university. McGraw-Hill International.

Hastie, C., Fahy, K., & Parratt, J. (2014). The development of a rubric for peer assessment of individual teamwork skills in undergraduate midwifery students. Women and Birth, 27(3), 220-226.

Hughes, R. L., & Jones, S. K. (2011). Developing and assessing college student teamwork skills. New Directions for Institutional Research, 2011, 53-64.

Kozlowski, S. W., & Bell, B. S. (2003). Work groups and teams in organizations. Handbook of psychology.

Riebe, L., Roepen, D., Santarelli, B., & Marchioro, G. (2010). Teamwork: effectively teaching an employability skill. Education and Training, 52(6/7), 528-539.




Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Bayshore Salon D

3:00pm PDT

CON04.09 - Getting to impact: Connecting evidence and practice
In light of rising pressures for transparency in post-secondary institutions in Canada, the need for evidence-based assessment of what we do is rapidly increasing. Yet, despite student cries for getting added value for their education (Fullan, 1993), there is little credible evidence to guide instructors in how to connect evidence and decision-making with practice. However, in this climate of change, successful teaching and learning centres are engaging key stakeholders in tracking how well various programs and services are working, and deciding on what evidence results in positive effects on teaching and learning (Healey, 2013; Scott, 2013). 

Drawing from and building upon this work, this presentation aims to describe the experiences of developing and implementing an impact assessment framework that integrates evidence with practice (Impact Plus) at McMaster University. We will provide tools to engage participants in: exploring what impact means; what counts as evidence; and, how impact is assessed within their own centres. By presenting preliminary findings from our ongoing study within Education Development, we will present tools and processes, and explore common challenges to and facilitators of getting to impact. Through paired dialogue, participants will discuss ways of translating these assessment approaches into effective strategies within their own contexts. Using newly developed performance indicators (ED-DEV, McMaster) for programs and activities, participants will come away with ideas for connecting evidence and practice for making informed decisions. 

Fullan, M. (1993). Change forces: probing the depths of educational reform. London: Falmer

Healey, M., Bradford, M., Roberts, C., & Knight, Y. (2013). Collaborative discipline-based curriculum change: applying change academy processes at department level, International Journal of Academic Development, 18, 31-44.

Scott, G. (2003). Effective change management in higher education, Educause review, Nov. 65-80.

Speakers
avatar for Janette Barrington

Janette Barrington

Associate Director, Educational Development, McMaster University
Janette Barrington is Manager, Strategic Initiatives, McMaster Institute for Innovation & Excellence in Teaching & Learning (MIIETL). She holds a PhD in Educational Technology and is actively involved in research on interdisciplinary perspectives on teaching and learning in higher... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm PDT
Salon 1

3:00pm PDT

CON04.05 - Sustained harmony: Building an institutional culture for the scholarship and practice of teaching and learning (SoTL)
Post-secondary institutions are placing growing emphasis on the importance of both the practice and scholarship of teaching and learning. Individuals and networks of practice (Roxå & Mårtensson, 2009; Roxå, Mårtensson, & Alveteg, 2011) across institutions are using SoTL’s cycle of systematic inquiry and dissemination to establish, implement, and investigate initiatives related to enriching the quality of our teaching and learning environments. In turn, engagement in the SoTL helps to establish a reciprocal culture of teaching and learning that is supported by SoTL, and a SoTL culture that is supported by a strong culture for teaching and learning. Recent research has focused on the importance of taking an integrated, multi-level approach to supporting the practice and scholarship of teaching and learning in post-secondary institutions (Williams et al., 2013). In this interactive session, participants will actively explore a multi-level framework for building a sustained culture for the scholarship and practice of teaching and learning, through both small group and large group discussion. The framework is based on a recent case study at the University of Guelph, which presents three catalysts for supporting engagement in the SoTL across multiple institutional levels: Leadership Commitment; Reward and Recognition; and Integrated Networks for Sustained Support (Kenny, Watson, & Desmarais, in press). By the end of this session, participants will be able to evaluate their own institutional context and use this framework to identify specific actions and opportunities for building and supporting a sustained culture for the scholarship and practice of teaching and learning. 

References:

Kenny, N., Watson, G. P. L., & Desmarais, S. (in press). Building sustained action: Supporting an institutional practice of SoTL at the University of Guelph. New Directions for Teaching and Learning. 

Roxå, T., & Mårtensson, K. (2009). Significant conversations and significant networks–exploring the backstage of the teaching arena. Studies in Higher Education, 34(5), 547-559. 

Roxå, T., Mårtensson, K., & Alveteg, M. (2011). Understanding and influencing teaching and learning cultures at university: a network approach. Higher Education, 62(1), 99-111. 

Williams, A. L., Verwoord, V., Beery, T. A., Dalton, H., McKinnon, J., Strickland, K., . . . Poole, G. (2013). The power of social networks: A model for weaving the scholarship of teaching and learning into institutional culture. Teaching and Learning Inquiry: The ISSOTL Journal, 1(2), 49-62.

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Kenny

Natasha Kenny

Natasha Kenny is Director of the Educational Development Unit in the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning at the University of Calgary
avatar for Gavan Watson

Gavan Watson

Associate Director, eLearning, Western University
Gavan P.L. Watson is the Associate Director, eLearning at Western University’s Teaching Support Centre and is the past chair of the Council of Ontario Educational Developers. With a PhD in environmental education, Gavan has a professional background in educational development and... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm PDT
Seymour Room

3:00pm PDT

CON04.10 - Coaching as a learning methodology in one University's Academic Leadership Development Program
While coaching is rapidly becoming a recognized, and evidence-based approach to learning and change (Stober and Grant, 2006; Nekoranec and Fourrier, 2013), and there is a large body of literature with respect to the development of skills in coaching practice (Blakey and Day, 2012; Britton, 2013), research on its efficacy in the higher education setting is just emerging. Given the conference theme of Achieving Harmony: Tuning into Practice, we note that coaching fosters learning (according to the principles of Ambrose, Bridges, and Lovett, 2010) that supports and sustains development, surfaces and explores complexity, gauges readiness for change, and helps reach action. The session explores the idea of bringing this value to our teaching, and to “student” learning in the context of developing educators. Participants will walk away with a preliminary understanding of: (i) how adapting a coaching methodology can accelerate learning, encourage greater accountability and an increased capacity to self-direct and self-correct, and enhance academic leadership development, and (ii) the flow of a coaching conversation in this context. The session will start with a brief introduction to the use of coaching as a learning methodology in a University’s Academic Leadership Development program, followed by a live coaching demonstration to help participants contextualize this work. After this, participants will engage in a peer coaching exercise and experience coaching and being coached. There will be an opportunity at the end to ask questions of the facilitators.

References:

Blakey, J., & Day, I. (2012). Challenging coaching: Going beyond traditional coaching to face the FACTS. London: Nicholas Brealey Publishing.

Britton, J. J. (2013). From one to many. best practices for team and group coaching. Ontario: John Wiley & Sons.\

Nekoranec, W., & Fourrier, D. (2013). Coaching managers through change. Training & Development, May, 26-29.

Stober, D. R., & Grant, A. M. (Eds.). (2006). Evidence based coaching handbook: Putting best practices to work for your clients. Hoboken N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm PDT
Salon 2

3:00pm PDT

CON04.11 - Addressing food insecurity through social innovation: improving the educational experience of physical and engineering science students through multi-disciplinary teamwork
Canadians waste ~40% of all food produced, while ~13% of Canadian households are food insecure (Gooch et al. 2010, Tarasuk et al. 2014). Given the many resources Canada has, there is a disconnect preventing every Canadian from having access to safe, nutritious, healthy food. To address these issues, students from multiple disciplines were brought together to develop solutions to reduce food insecurity and waste. Specifically, computer science students were tasked to work with community partners, local experts, and colleagues from disciplines spanning the physical and social sciences, to develop mobile and web-based apps to quantify and reduce food insecurity and waste. This talk explores the experiences of students, faculty, and partners over the course of a three year study of community-engaged scholarship within a third year computer science classroom. The talk will also provide observations from extracurricular events (e.g. hackathons) run parallel to the classroom. _x000D_
To capture student experience, attendees will be placed in multidisciplinary teams, and tasked with developing a prototype app that will quantify or reduce food insecurity or waste. Attendees will explore solution creation and refinement by understanding and integrating discipline specific knowledge, while also addressing community partners needs, and the intended users of their app. Attendees will learn the importance of communication, understanding and working with experts from multiple domains, and understanding the target audience of social innovation. Attendees will learn of the benefits of a community-engaged physical and engineering science classrooms, and of multidisciplinary student teams.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm PDT
Salon 3

3:00pm PDT

CON04.13 - Dissonance or harmony? Reflections on alignment between students-as-partners principles and practices in post-secondary Institutions in Canada
How do faculty and students meaningfully engage in partnerships to improve teaching and learning? What structural and institutional mechanisms support this kind of engagement? How do power differences between faculty and students impact engagement, particularly for students? Within the context of these questions, we (one faculty, one graduate student, and one undergraduate) examine Canadian cases to incorporate the principles of students-as-partners in teaching, research and institutional practices. Informed by international literature on students-as-partners (see Cook-Sather, Bovill, and Felten, 2014; Healey, Flint, and Harrington, 2014; Werder and Otis, 2010) as well as critical and feminist pedagogy (Fraser, 2009; Freire, 2000) we seek to identify sites of harmony and sites of dissonance between students-as-partners principles and practices, to help teaching and learning become more responsive to the tensions inherent in efforts to adopt students-as-partners principles. Specifically, this session includes: 1) a brief introduction to the literature on students-as-partners, 2) examples of student-faculty partnership from our own institutional contexts, and 3) participant discussion (using a jigsaw) of examples of student-as-partners practices they have adopted or have seen adopted. Participants will be invited to identify sites of harmony (cases where participants believe the principles have been successfully applied in practice), sites of dissonance (cases where participants believe the principles have not been successfully applied in practice) and strategies for reducing dissonance. This session is of interest to faculty and students who are curious about engaging in partnership activities, educational developers who may be supporting partnership activities, and educational administrators involved in institutional change efforts.

Cook-Sather, A., Bovill, C., and Felten, P. (2014). Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Fraser, N. (2009). Scales of justice: Reimagining political space in a globalizing world. New York: Columbia University Press. 

Freire, P. (2000). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: The Continuum International Publishing Group Inc. 

Healey, M., Flint, A., and Harrington, K. (2014). Engagement through partnership: Students as partners in learning and teaching in higher education. York: HE Academy. 

Werder, C., and Otis, M. (2010). (Eds.) Engaging student voices in the study of teaching and learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm PDT
Cypress 2 Room

3:00pm PDT

CON04.04 - Blending billionaires, beavers and banditos
In September 2014, the North American Studies program in the Faculty of Arts at Wilfrid Laurier launched a new, introductory course: Billionaires, Beavers, and Banditos. The aim was clear: provide first year students with innovative learning environments to facilitate the transition to university. We also wanted students to critically disrupt concepts including identity, citizenship, race, business, and the nation state. The course incorporated blended, active, interdisciplinary, and low risk/high reward learning. Students were required to assume greater ownership, becoming more ‘free range’ in the management of their course time and work. Still, a curricular framework was intentionally designed to foster university level skills development and learning habits, suited to competencies needed as dynamic life-long learners and ‘free range’, independent thinkers. This interactive session begins with a presentation of the course as a case study, demonstrating how a teaching environment that integrates technology facilitates blended learning to effectively transform a large lecture class to maximize engagement between instructors and students (Garrison and Kanuka, 2004). Preliminary evidence from the first offerings of the course will be reviewed. Colleagues in the sciences seem to have embraced blended learning more readily (Talbert, 2014), but similar approaches can be used in arts courses to achieve smaller class sizes and more active and engaged participation by a larger number of students. Modeling some of the active learning strategies used in the course, participants in this interactive session will work together to brainstorm and adapt a toolkit of proven teaching and learning strategies applicable to other large, introductory, university courses in the arts. 

Garrison, D. R., & Kanuka, H. (2004). Blended learning: Uncovering its transformative potential in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 7(2), 95–105.

Talbert, R. (2014, December). Exploring the Flipped Learning Model. Educational Development. Lecture conducted from Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm PDT
Mackenzie Room

3:00pm PDT

CON04.07 - Hold the phone: Tuning into mobile technology in higher education
This interactive session invites participants to discuss and explore the practical implications of working with mobile technology in our classrooms. Smartphone and tablet computer ownership continues to grow in Canada (comScore, 2014). Mobile devices are a capable and pervasive personal technology, with many people accessing content on multiple screens and devices throughout the day. The market penetration and the technical maturity of these devices do not of course translate smoothly into universal acceptance in our educational institutions. Some argue that these devices drive new forms of digital divide, for example between students able to ‘amplify’ their learning experiences and those who are distracted (Halverson & Halverson, 2012). A further divide exists between institutions and teachers who engage with these technologies, and those that seek to restrict or block their presence. It is challenging for educators and students to navigate the inevitable slippages in the educational application of consumer technologies: informal versus formal use, private communication versus public collaboration, consumption versus production of content, and so on. This is an especially pressing issue as institutions start moving towards a Bring Your Own Device model of IT services, one that recognises how these devices can cut across many dimensions of academics’ and students’ lives in ways that sometimes render traditional campus boundaries or classroom walls irrelevant. Bring your smartphones and tablets to explore playful conventions to design engaging learning activities that utilize mobile devices. Participants will share approaches and discuss obstacles to the acceptance and adoption of these technologies within formal learning spaces.

Cameron, D. (2009). Mashup: Digital media and drama conventions. In M. Anderson, J. Carroll, & D. Cameron (Eds.), Drama Education with Digital Technology (pp. 52 - 66). London: Continuum.

comScore (2014). 2014 Canada digital future in focus. http://www.comscore.com/Insights/Presentations-and-Whitepapers/2014/2014-Canada-Digital-Future-in-Focus.

Halverson, E. R., & Halverson, R. (2012). The design and assessment of 21st century learning environments. Recorded presentation, Centre for Research on Computer Supported Learning and Cognition, The University of Sydney. http://webconf.ucc.usyd.edu.au/p7ek82a56rw/

Johnson, L., Adams, S., & Cummins, M. (2012). NMC Horizon Report: 2012 K-12 Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm PDT
Chairman Room

3:00pm PDT

CON04.12 - Fostering lifelong learners in business education through the program-level integration of creative learning portfolios
Sheridan College’s Pilon School of Business Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) programs vision is to develop students “as lifelong learners to ensure that their transition to … work environments is smooth and seamless” (Bedrow & Evers, 2011, p. 407). This mandate calls on a mindset of transformational learning (Jarvis, 2006) embracing reflection (Brookfield, 2012), and culminating in the mastery of key employability competencies (Wagner, 2008). The Creative Learning Portfolio (CLP) (reflection and Desire2Learn ePortfolio tool) has been strategically integrated into the degrees. This approach is a unique Business school program-level implementation and a graduation requirement. Our CLP model encompasses an Introductory CLPs course (first year), Advanced CLPs course (final year), and curriculum and work place learning integration throughout the program. We adopted Zubizaretta’s (2009) learning portfolio model (experiences/reflection, evidence/documentation, and mentoring/collaboration).  In this interactive workshop, we will showcase the BBA programs’ CLP design and delivery model, experiences and lessons learned from the Introduction to CLPs course and curriculum integration activities (to 200+ students in Fall 2014/Winter 2015), student samples, and engage in interactive/reflective dialogue. As a result of this workshop, participants will be able to:

• Explore strategies for integrating and scaffolding portfolio learning and ePortfolios into program(s) and/or course(s).
• Inquire and reflect upon learning experiences including successes and setbacks to enable the fine-tuning of personal practice. 
• Nurture the reflective process and help learners purposefully develop metacognition skills for lifelong learning.
• Access reference list of relevant research papers._

References:

Berdrow, I. and Evers, F.T. (2010). Bases of Competence: A Framework for Facilitating Reflective Learner-Centered Educational Environments, Journal of Management Education. 35(3): 406-427.

Brookfield, S. D. (2012). Teaching for Critical thinking: Tools and Techniques to Help Students Question Their Assumptions. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.

Jarvis, P. (2006). Towards a comprehensive theory of human learning: Lifelong learning and the learning society, Vol 1. New York, NY: Routledge.

Wagner, T. (2008). The Global Achievement Gap: Why even our best schools don’t teach the new survival skills our children need and what can we do about it. NY: Basic Books.

Zubizaretta, J. (2009). The Learning Portfolio: Reflective Practice for Improving Student Learning, 2nd Edition; San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm PDT
Cypress 1 Room

3:00pm PDT

CON04.08 - Turning the tables: Bringing Aboriginal pedagogies into academic practice
I attended a roundtable focused on “Indigenizing The Classroom,” hoping to learn about “best practices” for incorporating Aboriginal pedagogies in post-secondary courses. Instead, presenters focused on incorporating indigenous content. When I asked presenters to comment on how they used Aboriginal pedagogies, they responded: “there aren’t any,” “it would be inappropriate,” and “it is impossible.” I was unsatisfied. Each Aboriginal community maintains its own protocols and philosophies concerning how to teach and learn in a good way. Some of these pedagogies are grounded in specific environments, languages, relationships, and systems. It is neither possible nor appropriate to extract these highly localized philosophies and practices from their cultural contexts. Yet there are several Aboriginal practices and philosophies that are more generalized, that can be mobilized effectively in post-secondary classrooms. These approaches include valuing oral testimony; seeking wisdom from one’s elders; sharing findings with one’s community; and taking a four-directions approach (especially engaging heart, body, and spirit in addition to the mind). In 2014, I put my research on Aboriginal pedagogies into practice, with outstanding outcomes for students and myself. In “Turning the Tables,” I present my findings, drawing from cutting-edge scholarship on “Indigenizing the Academy,” student feedback, and my own experiences. This presentation will explain how Aboriginal pedagogies work, with practical examples related to instruction, student engagement, assignments, and evaluation. I will demonstrate how decentring colonial educational approaches can acknowledge and encourage both cultural and scholastic diversity. Attendees will be invited to reflect on their own teaching practice in a circle discussion.

Battiste, M. (2013). Decolonizing education: Nourishing the learning spirit. Saskatoon: Purich Publishing Limited.

Graveline, F. J. (1998). Circle Works: Transforming Eurocentric consciousness. Halifax: Fernwood.

Hill, E. (2012). A critique of the call to ‘always indigenize!’. Peninsula 2(1). Retrieved from http://journals.uvic.ca/index.php/peninsula/article/view/11513/3212

Mihesuah, D. A. and Wilson, A. C. (Eds.). (2004). Indigenizing the academy: Transforming scholarship and empowering communities. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm PDT
Director Room

3:00pm PDT

CON04.02 - First day boot camp show and tell: How we moved beyond discussing the syllabus
Delivered just prior to a new academic year, MacEwan University’s First Day Boot Camp workshop offers faculty members strategies and activities for engaging students’ attention and encouraging their active involvement in a class, right from day one. Our STLHE session will combine condensed versions of Boot Camp activities we have found most interesting and motivating for faculty, with a look behind the scenes at how our Boot Camp has been built. Participants will have the opportunity to learn strategies both for stimulating student enthusiasm and for designing Boot Camp sessions that succeed in attracting faculty members even during a very busy time of year. Faculty members interested in grabbing students’ attention right from the first day of class will learn about carousel-style graffiti, techniques for managing power dynamics, avoiding information overload, and more. Educational developers seeking to hold similar First Day of Class workshops at their own institutions will benefit from the perspective of the presenters who also designed and facilitate the Boot Camp – an educational developer and two curriculum coordinators, all of whom teach – and the lessons we have learned about creating a session faculty will find appealing and useful.

M. Bart. (2009, July 6). How to use the first day of class to set the tone for entire semester. [Web log article]. Retrieved from http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-classroom-management/how-to-use-the-first-day-of-class-to-set-the-tone-for-entire-semester/

M. Weimer. (2013, January 9). First day of class activities that create a climate for learning. [Web log article.] Retrieved from http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/first-day-of-class-activities-that-create-a-climate-for-learning/

Speakers
avatar for Paul Martin

Paul Martin

Faculty Development Coordinator, MacEwan University


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm PDT
Bayshore Salon D

3:00pm PDT

CON04.03 - Curricular resonance: Making space for transformative learning through assessment

The relationship between assessment and transformative learning is a complicated and generally under-examined one (Fostaty-Young, 2012). In this session we aim to explore the pedagogical processes at play in the intersection of assessment with transformative learning. Building on Troop’s (2014) work with graduate students, you’ll have the opportunity to examine the relevance to your own instructional context of keyword writing (Luce-Kapler, 2004), critical analysis through journal keeping and other instructional and assessment strategies that have been found to make space for transformative learning. After a brief introduction to the research that informs conceptions of and supports for transformative learning, questions to be explored through guided small group discussion include: How might we use a harmonized (or aligned) curriculum to construct the dissonance that’s a necessary catalyst for transformative learning? How can we then assess (measure and observe) transformative learning? What are the inherent challenges with assessing transformative learning? In what ways does assessment enable and/or constrain the learning process? The intended learning outcomes for the session are that participants will: (a) Identify the inherent challenges and constraints of supporting and assessing transformative learning in their own instructional context and (b) Apply a framework to make curricular space to support the potential for transformative learning to occur and be assessed.

References: 

Fostaty-Young, S. (2012). Transformative Effects of Learning & Assessment Focused Educational Development. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. 

Luce-Kapler, R. (2004). Writing with, through, and beyond the text: An ecology of language. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Troop, M .(2014). Traversing Creative Space, Transforming Higher Education: A Contemporary Curricular View of Teaching and Learning. Unpublished doctoral disseration. Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.



Speakers
avatar for Meagan Troop (University of Guelph)

Meagan Troop (University of Guelph)

Curriculum Consultant for the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation, University of Guelph
SF

Sue Fostaty Young

Educational Developer, Queen's University
Sue is an Educational Developer and the Programs Manager of the Queen's University CTL. Her responsibilities include the development and delivery of programming for graduate students' and post-doctoral fellows' teaching development.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm PDT
Bayshore Salon EF

3:00pm PDT

CON04.06 - Active eLearning: Adapting established F2F teaching strategies to fit eLearning environments
Active learning techniques are widely used by instructors in face-to-face (F2F) classes in order to engage students in collaborative learning. This session will explore the adaption of F2F active learning strategies to fit eLearning environments. Specifically, the session will focus on a technique that combines Project-Based Learning (PBL) and the jigsaw method. In an eLearning environment, the two methods can be combined seamlessly if instructors can offer the right production tools to students. In this session, I will introduce four teaching tools that can be used to create learning objects by students employing PBL. The four tools are: Zaption, Educreations, Popplet, and VideoScribe. The jigsaw method will be modeled as session participants will be divided into small groups of 3-5. Each group will then examine one of the four teaching tools provided by the facilitator. The ‘experts’ on each tool will then share their expertise and insight with the rest of the session participants. Through eLearning teaching tool analysis, individual and small group work, and facilitated discussion, participants in this session will: (a) examine four eLearning teaching tools that can be used to facilitate active learning in an eLearning environment, (b) identify opportunities for these tools to be used to foster collaborative learning, active learning, or authentic assessment, and (c) use these eLearning teaching tools in their own instruction or introduce them to instructors whom they support.

Aronson, E., Blaney, N., Stephan, C., Sikes, J., & Snapp, M. (1978).The jigsaw classroom. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.

Jonassen, D. H., Davidson, M., Collins, M., Campbell, J., & Haag, B.B.(1995). Constructivism and computer-mediated communication in distance education. The American Journal of Distance Education, 9(2), 7-26. 

King, A. (1993). From sage on the stage to guide on the side. College Teaching, 41(1), 30-35. 

Hung, V.H.K., Keppell, M. & Jong, M.S.Y.(2004). Learners as producers: Using project based learning to enhance meaningful learning through digital video production. In R. Atkinson, C. McBeath, D. Jonas-Dwyer & R. Phillips (Eds), Beyond the comfort zone: Proceedings of the 21stASCILITE Conference (pp. 428-436). Perth, 5-8 December.

Speakers
avatar for Yasmien Mills (University of Victoria)

Yasmien Mills (University of Victoria)

Instructor, University of Victoria and Camosun
I have been an educator in higher ed for about 15 yrs. Recently, I've become more involved in Educational Technology. I have worked in Teaching Support Centres at Western University as well as Royal Roads University. In those roles I focused mostly on faculty development. But I... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:00pm - 4:00pm PDT
Thompson Room
 
Thursday, June 18
 

11:30am PDT

CON06.03 - Solving the puzzle of learning outcomes and curriculum: How do the pieces fit?
Effective student learning begins with well-designed programs. Integration of a learning outcomes and assessment approach into a curriculum improvement cycle is now the norm in curriculum design. Careful attention to constructive alignment in courses and programs clearly enhances the understanding of links between learning goals, learning activities, and assessment (Biggs, 2014; Hubball et al., 2007). It is essential for faculty to understand the elements and sequence of the curriculum improvement cycle. What is the cycle? Where are learning outcomes situated in the cycle? What is involved with program assessment? When does all this have to be done? Intended for faculty, curriculum committees, and administrators, the purpose of this session is to present and engage participants in developing a curriculum improvement process appropriate for their use. A continuous improvement model for curriculum development, based on published literature, will form the basis of the session. In small groups, participants will discuss the elements of an effective program assessment plan with emphasis on program learning outcomes in the context of their institutions. At the end of the session, participants should be able to name and describe the key stages in curriculum design and improvement, and make recommendations for direct and indirect assessment of their program-level learning outcomes. Well written program learning outcomes presented in the context of curriculum improvement benefit students, faculty and other stakeholders in understanding the rationale and structure of program design. Making transparent a fine-tuned curriculum design and assessment plan provides evidence of high quality educational experiences for students. 

References:

Anonymous, The educational value of course-level learning objectives/outcomes. Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence, Carnegie Mellon. Retrieved from http://www.cmu.edu/teaching/resources/Teaching/CourseDesign/Objectives/CourseLearningObjectivesValue.pdf
Biggs, J. (2014). Constructive alignment in university teaching. HERDSA Review of Higher Education, 1, 5-22. 

Hubball, H., Gold, N., Mighty, J., & Britnell, J. (2007). Supporting the implementation of externally generated learning outcomes and learning-centred curriculum development: an integrated framework. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Winter 2007, 112, 93-105.

Lizzio, A., Wilson, K., Simons, R. (2002). University students’ perception of the learning environment and academic outcomes: implications for theory and practice. Studies in Higher Education, 27, 27-52.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Arthur

Peter Arthur

University of British Columbia Okanagan
avatar for Stephanie Chu

Stephanie Chu

Vice Provost Teaching & Learning, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Passionate about advancing teaching and learning and related University community and culture. Imagine what we can do together!
avatar for Gary Hunt

Gary Hunt

Coordinator, Teaching and Learning Support, Thompson Rivers University
TRU
avatar for Liesel Knaack

Liesel Knaack

Director, Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning, Vancouver Island University
Liesel is the director of the Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning at VIU. The centre supports faculty and students with learning technologies, pedagogical design, online learning and scholarly teaching and learning. Liesel was formerly a K-12 teacher and Associate Professor... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Bayshore Salon EF

11:30am PDT

CON06.06 - Achieving harmony in educational development practice: What does that look like?
Two recent Western Canadian studies provide an in-depth investigation of current educational development and professional learning structures and practices within 35 Canadian colleges, institutes, and universities in BC and Alberta (Randall et al. 2013; Wilson & Kwong See, S. 2015). With organizational change in post-secondary institutions occurring at a rapid and often disruptive rate globally, nationally and provincially, these studies were able to provide an overview of the dimensions of educational development structures and describe current models of practice in these two provinces. But the educational development landscape is changing and so are the mandates for teaching and learning centres/units. In BC for example, almost 60% of reporting educational development centres have sustained their current mandate and model for five years or less. Are changes in educational development structure and practice achieving harmony within post- secondary institutions? Are Teaching and Learning Centre personnel prepared to support, even lead, rapidly moving institutional changes? This highly interactive workshop focuses on the benefits and drawbacks of a range of educational development and professional learning models. Participants will be asked to reflect on current structures and practices within their own institutions and then align their context with their preferred educational development model. Participants will leave the workshop having contributed to the analysis of sustaining and inhibiting factors for educational development leadership. The researchers will share key findings from their educational development and professional learning studies.

References:

Amundsen, C., & Wilson, M. (2012). Are we asking the right questions? A conceptual review of the educational development literature in higher education. Review of Educational Research, 82(1), 90-126. doi: 10.3102/0034654312438409

Randall, N., Heaslip, P., & Morrison, D. (2013). Campus-based Educational Development & Professional Learning: Dimensions & Directions. Vancouver, BC, Canada: BCcampus.

Stes, A., Min-Leliveld, M., Gijbels, D., & Van Petegem, P. (2010). The impact of instructional development in higher education: The state-of-the-art of the research. Educational Research Review, 5, 25-49. doi:10.1016/j.edurev.2009.07.001

Wilson, M., & Kwong See, S. (2015). Campus-based Educational Development in Alberta Post-Secondary Institutions. Edmonton, AB, Canada: University of Alberta.



Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Thompson Room

11:30am PDT

CON06.01 - Wellness and self-care for teachers: Practical solutions, and a call for change
This interactive workshop will focus on practices of self-care, wellness and balance for teachers in higher education. Autonomy with the promise of pursuing research and teaching in a collegial atmosphere are the ultimate pay off for becoming a professor. No wonder Susan Adams in a 2013 Forbes article named “university professor” as one of the least stressful jobs! In reality, stress, fatigue and burnout are not uncommon among post-secondary teachers who face pressing multiple demands from their personal and professional lives while dealing with swiftly changing institutions. These are the not-so-secret but seldom publicly acknowledged results of a work ethic focused on achievement against all odds and with a ‘do whatever it takes even if it ruins you’ attitude. These habits are often formed as students and are linked to achievement and recognition in young scholars. However, they may in fact set the stage for discord, lack of productivity and dissatisfaction by mid or later career. This workshop will discuss recent literature on wellness and focus on sharing practical strategies and solutions aimed at enhancing individual teacher self-care. We will also discuss our collective responsibility to change teaching culture to foster wellness as a core principle at an institutional level.

Sources:

Adams, Susan. (2013). The Least Stressful Jobs of 2013. Forbes, January 3, 2013. http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2013/01/03/the-least-stressful-jobs-of-2013/ Accessed January 9, 2015.

Hubball, H., & West, D. (2008). Faculty wellness strategies: Critical foundations for the scholarship of teaching and learning. Transformative Dialogues, Teaching & Learning Journal, 2(1), 1-11, Article 2.

Kabat-Zinn, Jon. Full Catastrophe Living (Revised Edition): Using the Wisdom of the Your Body and Mind to Face Stress, Pain, and Illness. New York: Bantam, 2013.


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Bayshore Salon ABC

11:30am PDT

CON06.05 - Creating SoTL concertos for institutional impact
Scholarship of teaching and learning can have a positive impact on educational quality at various levels such as institutional, disciplinary, and national (Poole, Taylor, & Thompson, 2007) but little work has assessed this impact, particularly at the institutional level (Poole & Simmons, 2013; Wuetherick & Yu, 2013). The purpose of the session is therefore to build on our 2014 presentation of work in progress to discuss: How can post-secondary institutions in Canada create a crescendo in Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) programs and practices such that they impact institutional pedagogical climates? We (authors for an upcoming special issue of New Directions in Teaching and Learning) will offer several institutional case studies as variations on a theme to provide examples and evidence of the potential impact of SoTL initiatives. A concerto is a piece for solo instrument and orchestra. Taking these case studies as solo lines, your role as workshop participants will be as the orchestra. In small and large groups you will draw parallels and explore distinctions in the case studies, outline challenges, and suggest recommendations for synthesized models. Your role in the concerto is to consider the merits of various practices, approaches to assessing impact, and make suggestions for resolving continuing challenges with this work such that you can implement successful practices at your own institution. 

References:

Poole, G., & Simmons, N. (2013). The contributions of the scholarship of teaching and learning to quality enhancement in Canada. In G. Gordon, & R. Land (Eds.), Quality enhancement in higher education: International perspectives. London: Routledge.

Poole, G., Taylor, L., & Thompson, J. (2007). Using the scholarship of teaching and learning at disciplinary, national and institutional levels to strategically improve the quality of post-secondary education. International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 1(2). 

Wuetherick, B., & Yu, S. (2013). The Canadian teaching commons: Exploring the state of SoTL in Canadian higher education. Presented at the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning annual conference, Raleigh, October 3-5.

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Kenny

Natasha Kenny

Natasha Kenny is Director of the Educational Development Unit in the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning at the University of Calgary
avatar for Elizabeth Marquis

Elizabeth Marquis

McMaster University
Beth Marquis is an Assistant Professor in the Arts & Science Program and the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL).
avatar for Roselynn Verwoord

Roselynn Verwoord

University of Victoria
avatar for Gavan Watson

Gavan Watson

Associate Director, eLearning, Western University
Gavan P.L. Watson is the Associate Director, eLearning at Western University’s Teaching Support Centre and is the past chair of the Council of Ontario Educational Developers. With a PhD in environmental education, Gavan has a professional background in educational development and... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Seymour Room

11:30am PDT

CON06.07 - Reaching the high notes: Evidencing your leadership in learning and teaching
In this interactive session we will consider the nature of academic leadership and evidencing the impact of academic leaders. In the UK, fellowship of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) is increasingly being seen as a benchmark of faculty and institutional credibility and professionalism and a focus on the student learning experience. Fellowships are available in four categories and, to achieve Senior and Principal Fellowship, applicants are required to evidence their academic leadership and their impact and influence on students, colleagues and the sector more broadly. Professor Cryan, Vice Chancellor of the University of Huddersfield where 100% of faculty have achieved fellowship, has stated that all staff had benefited from the process ‘which had translated into better teaching and improved academic performance by students’ (Cryan 2014). This session – co-presented by academic developers from the UK and Canada – will provide an opportunity for participants to consider the relevance of a sector-wide national framework for benchmarking professionalism in the leadership of learning and teaching such as the UK Professional Standards Framework (HEA 2011). Discussion will be prompted by short video sequences filmed with academics in the UK who have successfully gained recognition for their achievements and their academic leadership discussing the benefits that the process recognition has brought. Participants will debate the implications of professional recognition in the higher education sector in Canada and elsewhere. We will also consider how such a recognition framework could operate and, through it, how best to evidence achievements in teaching and supporting learning and in academic leadership.

References:

Cryan, B. (2014, March 5) Students in dark on teaching credentials. Times Higher No 2.141.

Higher Education Academy (2011) UK Professional Standards Framework. Retrieved from: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/professional-recognition/uk-professional-standards-framework-ukpsf

Speakers
avatar for Celia Popovic

Celia Popovic

Director Teaching Commons, York University
Susan Vail, associate vice-president teaching and learning at York University, has announced that Celia Popovic has been appointed to the position of director of York University’s Teaching Commons.“I am so pleased that Dr. Popovic will now have the opportunity to share her pedagogical... Read More →



Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Chairman Room

11:30am PDT

CON06.10 - Teaching and/or leadership? Leadership and/or teaching? Common threads, Common purpose?
Depending on how you conceive of leadership (leader as guide, etc.) and how you conceive of teaching (teacher as guide, etc.), you could be forgiven for using the labels interchangeably – they seem to share overlapping skill sets. What are seen as the best practices in some types of leadership (e.g., servant leadership, Spears, 2010) might inform our teaching practices and what are seen as best teaching practices (Samples & Copeland, 2013) might inform us as leaders. Yet, while many committed teachers shy away from taking on explicit leadership roles, often citing workload and stress concerns, Parker Palmer (2000, p.74) reminds us that “”Leadership” is a concept we often resist. …. But if it is true that we are made for community, then leadership is everyone’s vocation, and it can be an evasion to insist that it is not”. During this guided discussion, which will include a variety of solo, partner and small group activities, we will explore how these conceptions of teaching and leadership might encourage us to consider accepting more explicit leadership opportunities, to refine our decision making about what leadership opportunities we want to nurture or decline, and/or to expand our conceptualization of what might constitute leadership within the diverse landscape of academic culture. By the end of the discussion, participants will have better questions to consider when making decisions about their potential contributions to collegial leadership in their departments, institutions, or disciplines.

Palmer, P. J. (2000). Let your life speak: Listening for the voice of vocation. San Francisco, CA: Wiley & Sons.

Samples, J. W., & Copeland, S. E. (2013). The universality of good teaching: A study of descriptors across disciplines. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 25(2), 176-188.

Spears, L. C. (2010). Character and servant leadership: Ten characteristics of effective, caring leaders. The Journal of Virtues & Leadership, 1, 25-30.


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Salon 2

11:30am PDT

CON06.08 - Illuminating scholarship to students: The role of librarian-faculty course collaborations
Faculty-librarian collaborations can lead to effective assignments, in-class activities and resources that guide students towards better research and writing (Kuh, 2008). Bolan et al. (2014) identifying criteria for effective faculty-librarian collaboration, highlight that, for collaborative success, faculty and librarians should work together towards shared learning outcomes, ensuring that their learning activities tune students into the practice of scholarship. Information literacy, the set of skills needed to find, retrieve, analyze, and use information (Association of College and Research Libraries, 2015), is often the starting point for building an effective collaboration as it is a competency that both faculty and librarians have refined throughout their academic experiences (Bennett, O., & Gilbert, K., 2009; Brasley, 2008; Gunnarsson et al., 2014). Join us for an interactive session highlighting collaborative strategies such as designing homework for finding scholarly references, in-class discussions and assignments on avoiding plagiarism, copyright cleared readings linked on course websites, online resource guides for students, and in-class visits by librarians with examples that integrate research tools into students’ growing understanding of scholarship. Through individual, small and whole group activities, we will share our experiences and seek your examples, questions and comments. Let’s combine our experiences to improve literacy and scholarship amongst our students. You will leave the session with links to a web guide summarizing our collaborative philosophy, and our examples. We believe that when faculty, librarians and others work together, their shared passion for illuminating scholarship really translates the scholarly narrative into something visible, doable and beautiful.

Association of College and Research Libraries. (2015). Introduction to information literacy.http://www.ala.org/acrl/issues/infolit/overview/intro

Bennett, O., & Gilbert, K. (2009). Extending liaison collaboration: Partnering with faculty in support of a student learning community. Reference Services Review, 37(2), 131-142. doi:10.1108/00907320910957170

Brasley, S. S. (2008). Effective librarian and discipline faculty collaboration models for integrating information literacy into the fabric of an academic institution. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 2008(114), 71-88. doi:10.1002/tl.318

Bolan, J, P. Bellamy, J. Szurmak, R. Vine. (2014). A Partnership for Academic and Student Success: Educational Developers, Librarians and Lessons Learned University of Toronto. 2014 STLHE Conference.

Gunnarsson, J., Kulesza, W., and Pettersson, A. (2014). Teaching international students how to avoid plagiarism: Librarians and faculty in collaboration. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 40(3-4), 413-417.

Kuh, GD (2008). High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them and Why They Matter. AAC&U Publications.

Lead Speaker(s)
Speakers
avatar for Alice Cassidy

Alice Cassidy

Principal, In View Education and Professional Development
Alice Cassidy is an educational developer, science educator and wildlife biologist. She has designed, taught and coordinated courses at the University of British Columbia, and led large-scale educational programs. As a consultant, she leads workshops on teaching and learning. She... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Director Room

11:30am PDT

CON06.04 - Facilitating learners' workplace research
Introduction: Workplace learning may be well recognized yet the integration of graduate research into the workplace is less common. It can provide meaningful opportunities for learners to generate new evidence that is valuable for learners and the workplace. A model to support learners and supervisors in workplace research (Helyer, 2011; Liyanage, et al. 2013) that was created for online distance graduate program provides an example for facilitating graduate students’ workplace research. Analysis of retrospective and prospective evaluation data provides strong evidence of the model’s effectiveness for students and is considered in light of Cooke’s model for building research capacity (2005).

Objectives: Participants will be able to: (a) assess the potential of modifying an established model for facilitating workplace research for their discipline and (b) judge the value of the ideas shared by colleagues for supporting and growing learners’ opportunities to do workplace research.

Approach: After a brief introduction to the model and evaluation findings, participants will assess the model, explore ideas for applying the model in different contexts, suggest challenges, and ways to modify the model for their own discipline. Ideas generated will be distributed post-session.

Conclusion: Participation in workplace research requires careful design and planning, collaboration and the right support. Enhancing awareness of facilitators of workplace research can spark ideas for overcoming barriers that impede the growth of meaningful workplace research. 

References:

Cooke, J. (2005). A framework to evaluate research capacity building in health care. BMC Family Practice, 6, 44. doi:10.1186/1471-2296-6-44

Helyer, H. (2011). Aligning higher education with the world of work. Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, 1(2), 95-105. doi: 10.1108/20423891111128872

Liyanage, L., Strachan, R., Penlington, R., & Casselde, B. (2013). Design of educational systems for work based learning (WBL): The learner experience. Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, 3(1), 51-61. doi: 10.1108/20423891311294984


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Mackenzie Room

11:30am PDT

CON06.09 - Physical spaces shape head spaces: Transforming teaching practices (Sponsored by STEELCASE - 2015 Gold Sponsor)
An industrial model of spatial and behavioral conditioning and the corresponding didactic teaching practices that they promote has been education’s norms for over a century . Today, multiple, diverse and powerful forces are pushing higher education to reconsider how to make teaching practice more effective. In this session, we will explore how our physical spaces need to change to promote new modes of teaching and learning and share examples of how new active learning spaces have changed both the “how” and the “what” of learning. We will then engage participants in an interactive session using the Steelcase Design Thinking Protocol that progresses from “Know” to “Wonder” to “Learn”. First, we will engage you in a discussion of what you already KNOW: (1) think back to a time you did your best work, (2) think back to a powerful learning e xperience, (3) where do you believe your students do their best learning, and (4) can you describe in detail what physical space(s) you were in for each? We will then pose the question, “WHAT DO YOU WONDER?” If you believe education is about learning, what responsibility do we have as educators and/or education administrators to focus on how best to foster learning instead of how to promote teaching? Finally, we will end with WHAT DID YOU LEARN about what you can do next? This form of intention setting helps to translate ideas into action, and to change our headspace so we can make progress in transforming teaching practice.


Scott-Webber, L. (2004). In_sync: Environment behavior theory and the design of learning places. MI: The Society for College and University Planning.

Hackett, J. P. (2007). Preparing for the perfect product launch. Harvard Business Review, pp 45-50

This session is sponsored by STEELCASE (2015 Gold Sponsor)





Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Salon 1

11:30am PDT

CON06.11 - Small FLICS to big flips: A step-by-step process to flip your classroom
Flipped Learner-Centred Interactive Classroom Strategies (FLICS) provides a framework to create deep learning experiences for students using active learning strategies. Flipped learning flips the traditional homework vs. class time paradigm (Gerstein, 2012; Strayer, 2011). Lectures along with other resources and activities are moved online to focus class time on activities that allow instructors and students to work together with the course material (Bergmann & Sams, 2012). As flipping the entire classroom or course can be a daunting task it has been suggested that starting small with microflips (Buemi, 2014) should alleviate the anxiety of flipping an entire course. In such, FLICS was developed to facilitate the step-by-step process of supporting instructors to create a flipped learning environment. By starting small, instructors are able to focus on creating a positive, adaptable meaningful learning experience for both instructor and students. Current flipped frameworks (Gerstein, 2012; Strayer, 2011) provide a high-level conceptual overview of how a flipped classroom works. The FLICS model, however, provides a visual step-by-step guide to flipped learning by integrating and sequencing online and classroom activities while highlighting the role of both instructor and student in the learning process. This interactive session will provide an opportunity for participants to collaborate with peers, share ideas, and develop practical skills to flip their own classroom by providing participants the opportunity to:

1. Conceptualize how to incorporate a flipped approach into their educational practice
2. Discuss the instructor and student roles in flipped learning
3. Create their own flipped lesson using FLICS

References:

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom. Reach every student in every class every day. ISTE, Eugene: Oregon.

Buemi, S. (2014, April). Microflipping: a modest twist on the ‘flipped’ classroom. The Chronicle of Higher Education, Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/article/Microflipping-a-Modest-Twist/145951/?cid=wb&utm_source=wb&utm_medium=en

Gerstein, J. (2012). The flipped classroom model: A full picture. Retrieved from https://www.scribd.com/doc/98582232/Jackie-Gerstein-The-Flipped-Classroom-Model

Strayer, J. (2011). Flipped Classroom: The flipped classroom infographic. Retrieved from http://www.knewton.com/flipped-classroom/



Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Salon 3

11:30am PDT

CON06.13 - Lightboard 101: Creating naturally engaging video content for flipped learning
At a growing number of educational institutions, faculty have been using a Lightboard to create engaging instructional videos for online and blended learning environments, allowing the instructor to employ gestures as he or she would in a typical classroom setting. Creating engaging online content can be a challenge. Have you ever found it difficult to explain something without using your hands or waving your arms? Gestures are among our most heavily relied-upon student engagement tools, and we often use them as such without even realizing it. Gestures also aid learning, since they “provide the material that ‘glues’ layers of perceptually accessible entities and abstract concepts" (Roth & Welzel, 2001 p.103). It is not surprising that many educators who excel in the classroom face challenges creating engaging instructional videos, since many instructional video production techniques are not conducive to the integration of gestures; even when screen capture software incorporates the instructor's face on camera, it is still difficult for the instructor to interact with the content by pointing, annotating, drawing, etc. During this interactive session, you will find out what the Lightboard is, learn how it is used, and discover its possibilities as a teaching tool. Through testimonials, student feedback and educator feedback, you will witness how the Lightboard is transforming virtual learning environments and impacting student learning. You will view Lightboard-created content, observe the intuitive video creation process and perhaps even get the opportunity to try your hand at using it! 

Roth, W.-M.,& Welzel, M. (2001). From Activity to gestures and scientific language. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 38, 103-136.

Flevares, L. M., & Perry, M. (2001). How many do you see? The use of nonspoken representations in first-grade mathematics lessons. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93, 330-345.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Buchanan (Humber College)

Lisa Buchanan (Humber College)

Professor, Sport Management, Humber College


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Cypress 2 Room

11:30am PDT

CON06.02 - Designing and implementing meaningful assessments
Learning effective research, analytical, and written communication skills are crucial to the development of competent graduates across disciplines. Yet the means by which evaluations cultivate or appraise these skills are limitless. Effective assessments vary according to subject, class size, composition, level, and so on, although at their core, pedagogically sound evaluations should align with the learning objectives of any given course or program. To be perceived as worthwhile, however, these arrangements must also be relevant to, and advance, students’ educational and vocational aspirations. Instructors are increasingly compelled to meet two, sometimes competing, obligations in their courses: to provide flexible and responsive learning opportunities for all students while also adhering to specific and measurable learning outcomes. This session will explore approaches instructors can use to improve the impact of their assignments without multiplying their workload or compromising the integrity of their learning outcomes. Drawing on specific examples from our teaching, including the use of individual learning plans and creative projects, we will outline how evaluations can be constructed to maintain rigor and enhance course-related learning. This is a participatory session intended to provide an overview of successful assessment design and implementation strategies. While we will present a couple approaches instructors can use to create meaningful assessments, significant emphasis will be placed on attendees sharing ideas and resources concerning implementation, challenges surrounding the use of specific forms of evaluation, and potential obstacles to effective execution.


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Bayshore Salon D

11:30am PDT

CON06.12 - Sources of inspiration: Tuning into specialized student needs for new approaches to teaching and learning
Many of the “high notes” in higher education lie in transformative learning (Mezirow, 1997) and threshold knowledge (Meyer & Land, 2005). Students often view their instructors as the conductor leading them through these transformative moments to changes in perception. Yet, there are times when this dynamic is reversed – when the students lead the way towards new teaching approaches. These are rich opportunities that we, as instructors, can miss if we are not “tuned in” to the potential insights revealed when students struggle with course content. This workshop highlights examples from four different subjects within two disciplinary contexts (English and Biological Sciences) in which the broader pedagogical approach to a subject was modified as a result of “tuning in” to the learning challenges students encountered. In English, strategies were developed for students who were facing language proficiency issues. In molecular biology, human anatomy and physiology, accommodations were developed for a visually impaired student. The common chord among the disciplines was that the accommodation for these individuals resulted in the development of better pedagogical models for the broader classroom population. In addition to seeing various discipline-specific examples, this hour-long interactive session will require participants to engage in the learning activity developed for the visually impaired student. Participants will also have the opportunity to share their own experiences with meeting specialized needs, and work with the presenters to see how those attempts may (or may not) lead towards a new pedagogical model. 

References:

Meyer, J. H. F., & Land, R. (2005). Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge (2): Epistemological considerations and a conceptual framework for teaching and learning. Higher Education, 49 (3), 373 – 388. doi:10.1007/s10734-004-6779-5 

Mezirow, J. (1997). Transformative learning: Theory to practice. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, (74), 5–12. doi:10.1002/ace.7401

Speakers
avatar for Richelle Monaghan (Wilfrid Laurier University)

Richelle Monaghan (Wilfrid Laurier University)

Assistant Professor, Head of Science Programming in Public Health, Wilfrid Laurier University


Thursday June 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm PDT
Cypress 1 Room