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Achieving Harmony: Tuning into Practice

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Thursday, June 18
 

10:30am PDT

CON05.07 - Small number's adventures in mathematics and language

The main aim of this workshop is to discuss the following question: how can we increase students' engagement with academic concepts in a way they find attractive, interesting, and thought provoking?

To steer this discussion we will share our experience from our attempt to use popular media to promote and teach concepts coming from seemingly unconnected areas: First Nations' languages and mathematics. We will also show a selection of clips from animated films about Small Number, a young boy who recognizes mathematics in everything around him. We will give a few examples how the films have been used as learning resources in various forms, nationally and internationally. The Small Number stories have been translated and narrated into several First Nations' languages. 

We invite everyone who has experimented with or is thinking about using popular media in teaching to join us for this session. Some of the questions that we intend to discuss include: Are popular media appropriate vehicles to communicate 'high culture' with students? What do we gain or/and lose when we adjust complex and possibly trandisciplinary ideas to the format of a particular medium? How do we measure the impact that a learning resource in the pop cultural format makes, both locally and globally? And what happens when our learning resources get their (pop cultural) lives on their own?

References:

Jungic, V., & Mac Lean, M., (2011). Small Number: Breaking the pattern, CMS Notes, Volume 43 No. 6, 10-13

Singh, S., (2013). The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets. New York, NY: Bloomsbury.




Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am PDT
Salon 2

10:30am PDT

CON05.04 - Leadership team coaching to develop teaching and learning capacity in a business school
This session explores a case study of developing a new leadership team dedicated to improving teaching and learning culture and practices within an existing local academic unit. We will expose and examine key conditions and requirements for fostering collective leadership and creating new structures for change at the local level within a comprehensive university setting. We will share how visioning and strategic planning including visual facilitation techniques (Sibbett, 2011) and leadership team coaching methods (Hawkins, 2011) resulted in collective vision, shared strategic priorities, and action plans. We will draw on socio-cultural and socio-material educational research (Fenwick and Nerland, 2014), and we will share the story of moving from single-point to collective ownership over professional development at a Vancouver business school.After we briefly describe the context and share results from our experience, participants will use image-based tools (Martel and Tiernan, n.d.) and facilitated discussion to explore the following question: 

What conditions must be in place to foster collaborative and collective ownership around teaching and learning in disciplines?This session will appeal to experienced educational developers, faculty leaders, and committee chairs interested in organizational change, professional and work-based learning, and socio-cultural theory.

Fenwick, T. and Nerland, M. eds. (2014). Reconceptualizing professional learning: Sociomaterial knowledges, practices, and responsibilities. New York: Routledge.

Hawkins, P. (2011). Leadership team coaching: Developing collective transformational leadership. London: Kogan Page.

Martell, C., & Tiernan, T. (n.d.). VisualsSpeak. Retrieved December 12, 2014, from http://www.visualsspeak.com/

Sibbett, D. (2009). Visual teams: Graphic tools for commitment, innovation and high performance. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.



Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am PDT
Chairman Room

10:30am PDT

CON05.05 - Threshold concepts in higher education
Threshold concepts “can be considered as akin to a portal, opening up a new and previously inaccessible way of thinking about something” (Meyer & Land, 2003, p.1). More than just key concepts or pieces of knowledge, threshold concepts represent an entirely new way of understanding a subject, one that can be troublesome but ultimately transformative for the learner. Emerging out of a large-scale collaborative project involving universities across the United Kingdom, threshold concepts have recently generated a great deal of interest internationally, including being labeled as an innovation with the potential to provoke a major shift in higher education (Sharples et al, 2014). Originally focused on improving teaching and learning within disciplines, recent studies illustrate that threshold concepts are also useful for initiating cross- and inter-disciplinary discourses (Carmichael, 2010). As such, the adoption of threshold concepts for curricular and pedagogical investigations could prove significantly beneficial for institutions, departments, and individual educators. This interactive session will begin with an introduction to the threshold concepts framework, share recent disciplinary and interdisciplinary research in the area, and engage the audience in conversation around using the threshold concepts framework to fine-tune practice. Participants will be guided in developing an understanding of threshold concepts in their field and in recognizing potential areas of application and navigating possible challenges. It is expected participants will leave with both increased knowledge of threshold concepts and the skills to begin their own work/study in this area.

Carmichael, P. (2010). Threshold concepts, disciplinary differences and cross-disciplinary discourse. Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, 7(2), 53–71.

Meyer, J.H.F. & Land, R. (2003). Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge: linkages to ways of thinking and practising within the disciplines. In: Rust, C. (Ed.) Improving Student Learning: Improving Student Learning Theory and Practice–Ten Years On. Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development, Oxford 

Sharples, M., Adams, A., Ferguson, R, Gaved, M. McAndrew, P., Weller, M., & Whitelock, D. (2014). Innovating Pedagogy 2014: Open University Innovation Report 3. Milton Keynes: The Open University. Available from http://www.open.ac.uk/blogs/innovating/?p=3

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Shaw

Ashley Shaw

PhD student/instructor, University of British Columbia
I’m working on a PhD in Education. I love technology, and am fascinated by the impact it has on people and society.I wear Converse most of the time.I’m always cynical, generally irreverent, and often offensive.I knit. A lot.


Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am PDT
Director Room

10:30am PDT

CON05.02 - Students' perceptions of self-directed learning: Meaning, experiences, and value
Canadian post-secondary institutions aim to graduate critical thinkers, lifelong learners, and people who work well with others. But how do students develop these skills? Self-directed learning (SDL) is promoted as a process for developing student aptitude for lifelong independent and social learning (Brookfield, 2009). For instructors, students’ perceptions of their experiences with SDL provide critical input to informing the facilitation of this process (Raidal & Volet, 2009). This workshop presents findings from a course-based SoTL inquiry project designed to understand the experiences of 17 upper-level undergraduate students enrolled in a special topics SDL course using formal debate and seminar activities. Thematic analysis of a pre/post qualitative survey revealed students’ initially sensed uncertainty–yet satisfaction–in setting their own learning goals and charting their own learning paths. In moving through the SDL process, uncertainty transitioned into appreciating different ways of learning, which gave rise to an intrinsic sense of fulfillment in achieving their own learning goals. This workshop is organized into two parts: first, an overview of the project’s findings framed within the SDL literature, and second, participants sharing examples of their successes and challenges in facilitating SDL and discussing strategies to effectively prepare students for SDL. The intended outcome is to generate ideas for instructors to better design and support students through course-based SDL activities. This session will be of interest to faculty interested in using SDL in classrooms, educational developers who support instructors in using SDL, and educational administrators interested in learning more about the course-level application of SDL._x000D_
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Brookfield, S. (2009). Self-Directed Learning. In R. Maclean & D. N. Wilson (eds.), International Handbook of Education for the Changing World of Work: Bridging Academic and Vocational Learning (pp. 2615-2627). Bonn: Springer._x000D_
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Raidal, S. L., & Volet, S. E. (2009). Preclinical students’ predispositions towards social forms of instruction and self-directed learning: a challenge for the development of autonomous and collaborative learners. Higher Education, 57(5), 577–596.


Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am PDT
Seymour Room

10:30am PDT

CON05.10 - Bridging campus and community through flexible learning: Continuing professional education for Aboriginal learners
The Certificate in Aboriginal Health and Community Administration provides an excellent example of flexible learning and continuing professional development for Indigenous adult learners that links campus with community and workplace needs. Offered in partnership between the University of British Columbia Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Heath and University of British Columbia Continuing Studies, this blended-learning program draws approximately two-dozen learners annually from urban and rural settings who are interested in building administration skills in communication, leadership, human resources, information management, policy development and research, in order to strengthen the health and capacity of Indigenous communities. In this session, the certificate partners will use group discussion and case studies to highlight the design elements that facilitate the success of the program for this group of learners, noting how Indigenous approaches to teaching and learning are woven throughout the ten-month, blended-learning experience. They will explore the benefits of the online format (Kawalilak, Wells, Connell & Beamer, 2012) and how having Elders and instructors grounded in Indigenous andragogy leading the sessions and opening circles, ensures there is space for the learners to bring their whole selves to the experiential residential components.(Chase, Charnley & McLean, 2010) The presenters will outline how the program design supports participants to bring their extensive work experience to the courses, as they integrate and apply the new concepts to their home communities through the assignments. Case studies highlighting challenging moments in program implementation will also be shared for group discussion, analysis and consideration for those thinking of designing similar programs at their home institutions.

Chase, M, Charnley, K. & McLean, S. (2010). Recognizing Aboriginal oral tradition through blended learning: A success story. In F. Sudweeks, H. Hrachovec & C. Ess, (Eds). Proceedings Cultural Attitudes Towards Communication and Technology (pp.19-27). Murdoch, Australia: Murdoch University. 

Kawalilak, C., Wells, N., Connell, L. & Beamer, K. (2012). E-learning access, opportunities, and challenges for Aboriginal adult learners located in rural communities. College Quarterly, 15 (2).


Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am PDT
Cypress 2 Room

10:30am PDT

CON05.09 - Creating, implementing and evaluating flipped classroom e-learning
There are numerous approaches to flipped learning. We define flipped learning as structured learning that occurs outside the traditional classroom setting. Students are exposed to content before coming to class, freeing up class time for deeper learning (versus information transfer). In our program, we create e-learning modules that typically consist of videos with embedded questions that guide student inquiry. Students are given related assignments that they do independently or collaboratively. During class, active learning strategies are used to further explore the e-learning content and homework assignments. This session will focus on our flipped learning approach--specifically the development and implementation of e-learning modules, and evaluation of their impact on student learning. Faculty of Nursing and the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology will share a template for designing and developing e-learning modules for flipped learning. Some questions to guide our discussion are: What types of didactic content are appropriate for e-learning module conversion? When creating videos for e-learning modules, how should content be recorded and edited to promote student engagement and learning? What other instructional technology can be used to enhance collaborative learning among students and between students and faculty? How are guest speakers best utilized in e-videos? We will provide examples of videos that facilitate learning. This session will include how rubrics are used to guide student learning; and how faculty use them for formative and summative evaluations. In our program, we design specific learning objectives and rubrics to accompany our e-learning modules, class activities and graded assignments.

Grossman, R. (2008). Structures for facilitating student reflection. College Teaching, 57(1), 15-22.

Kiteley, R., & Ormrod, G. (2009). Towards a team-based, collaborative approach to embedding e-learning within undergraduate nursing programmes. Nurse Education Today, 29, 623-629. 

Ryan, M., & Ryan, M. (2012). Theorising a model for teaching and assessing reflective learning in higher education. Higher Education Research & Development, 32(2), 244-257. 

The University of British Columbia Flipped Network (2014). Available at: http://flippedlab.learning.University of British Columbia.ca/2013/09/14/flipped-lab-examining-what-works-in-a-flipped-classroom



Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am PDT
Cypress 1 Room

10:30am PDT

CON05.01 - Exploring the integration of SoTL research results in institutional processes
This interactive panel and discussion addresses the follow question: How can we encourage the application of SoTL research by adapting or developing institutional processes to increase SoTL use. Support for creative and scholarly work on teaching and learning has evolved in parallel with a growing emphasis in the wider research community on the complimentary activity of knowledge mobilization and the use of research by practitioners. While we have made significant progress in supporting the ‘supply’ side of SoTL research, we have not had the same success in cultivating the ‘demand’ side. The goal of this session is to explore ideas on how institutions can better support the application of existing SoTL research to advance teaching and leaning. In the first half of the session panel members will initiate the discussion by summarizing recent pilot studies, from three Canadian universities, where SoTL knowledge mobilization was imbedded in institutional processes. Panelists will report from the perspectives of multiple roles (as faculty, students, educational developer and institutional executive). These examples are at early stages of evaluation and institutional integration. At the end of the session participants will: have shared and discussed institutional examples of knowledge mobilization practice; considered how current practice at their institution might be further integrate existing SoTL research to enhance institutional processes (beyond individual faculty work); identified potential steps to further this approach at their institutions to enhance institutional planning and goal setting. We look forward to learning from others about their interests, ideas and progress in this area. 

References:
Haigh, N., Gossman, P., & Jiao, X. (2011). Undertaking an institutional ‘stock-take’of SoTL: New Zealand university case studies. Higher Education Research & Development, 30 (1), 9-23.

Hutchings, P., Borin, P., Keesing-Styles, L., Martin, L., Michael, R., Scharff, L., Simpkins, S. & Ismail, A. (2013). The scholarship of teaching and learning in an age of accountability: building bridges. Teaching and Learning Inquiry: The ISSOTL Journal, 1(2), 35-47.

McKinney, K. (2003). Applying the scholarship of teaching and learning: How can we do better? The Teaching Professor, August-September: 1,5,8.

Wright, M. C., Finelli, C. J., Meizlish, D., & Bergom, I. (2011). Facilitating the scholarship of teaching and learning at a research university. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 43 (2), 50-56.


Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am PDT
Mackenzie Room

10:30am PDT

CON05.08 - Quiet voices: Processes to better hear sessional instructors in awards for teaching
The literature on teaching awards describes three purposes for introducing and sustaining teaching awards in higher education: to publicly acknowledge (or be seen to acknowledge) support for teaching; to recognize teaching excellence; and, to encourage or inspire teaching excellence (Carusetta, 2001; Van Note Chism, 2006). What goes unstated in this literature is that these purposes, and the award criteria, presuppose the winners as faculty members at the institution. Much of the existing literature has focused on the impact of teaching awards – whether for contributions to teaching culture or incentivizing improvement – and methods to ensure criteria and evaluation validity and equity (Halse et al, 2007). However, “equity” in this literature has been limited to award distribution across gender, discipline, classroom context and age; discussions of equity have not yet taken into account instructor status within the institution. Specifically, these discussions have not yet engaged with how the opportunity to win these awards for sessional, or contract instructors, is impacted by award criteria and processes.

It is to this discussion we turn in our 45-minute interactive workshop. In the workshop we introduce representative examples of teaching awards, criteria, processes and winner profiles from Ontario institutions and national bodies. We then demonstrate how existing award criteria largely forecloses the likelihood of sessional instructors being nominated and selected for teaching awards. We then work collaboratively with participants to envision teaching award criteria and processes more likely to include sessional instructors. The overarching aim of this workshop is to interrogate existing processes and criteria of teaching awards in Canada and to envision alternate and more inclusive futures.


Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am PDT
Salon 3

10:30am PDT

CON05.03 - Constructing integrated testlets across disciplines

An integrated testlet (IT) is a new tool which assesses students’ understanding of complex ideas (Anderson & Krawthohl, 2001) through a set of scaffolded multiple-choice items, each adopting an answer-until-correct format. Students answer each item within an IT until the correct answer is revealed to them, and they then advance to the next item with full knowledge of, and benefit from, answers to previous items. ITs can be valid and efficient replacements for free-response questions, as they assess complex cognitive processes while also rewarding partial knowledge (Slepkov & Shiell, 2014). The extent of scaffolding within an IT, denoted the “testlet integration”, can vary from weakly- to strongly-integrated, depending upon how much the instructor desires previous items within an IT to assist students in answering later items (Shiell & Slepkov, 2015). ITs were originally conceived within strongly-cumulative disciplines such as physics and math and now find themselves at a pivotal point, awaiting widespread adoption across other disciplines. In this session, we shall first introduce the purpose and some advantages of ITs, and then engage delegates, as teaching experts in their own field, in considering ITs within their discipline. By the end of this collaborative conversation delegates will have learned how their discipline can benefit, and to what extent, from ITs, and also contributed to the discussion of whether the extent of testlet integration is necessarily discipline-specific.



Anderson, L.W. & Krathwohl, D.R. (Eds.) (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives. New York: Longman.

Slepkov, A.D. & Shiell, R. C. (2014). Comparison of integrated testlet and constructed-response question formats. Physical Review Special Topics - Physics Education Research, 10, 020120. http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.10.020120

Shiell, R.C. & Slepkov, A. D. (2015). Integrated testlets: A new form of expert-student collaborative testing. Collected Essays on Learning and Teaching, 8, 31-40 (in press).



Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am PDT
Thompson Room

10:30am PDT

CON05.06 - Integrating community based learning and research into undergraduate teaching
Universities are under increasing pressure to develop program outcomes that relate student learning to the ‘real world’. Community based learning and research (CBLR) provides students with opportunities to relate their classroom learning to community interests, developing their competencies and skills as practitioners of their discipline. A substantial body of research (e.g., Conway, Amel, & Gerwien, 2009; Yorio & Ye, 2012) has demonstrated the benefits of CBLR on student learning; well-designed CBLR courses and programs contribute to the academic, personal, social, and civic development of students.

The objective of this session is to demonstrate the integration of CBLR into undergraduate courses and programs. Participants will be provided with examples of courses that involve local and global community partners and vary in the degree to which they incorporate CBLR. Challenges, solutions, and rewards associated with the implementation of CBLR (Hondagneu-Sotelo & Raskoff, 1994) will be considered.

During the session, speakers will share their experiences as instructors who have taught CBLR courses and as Associate Deans who have advocated for the integration of CBLR into the core curriculum of their faculty. In breakout groups moderated by session speakers, participants will share their experiences, and get feedback on strategies to implement CBLR into their courses and programs. The session will conclude with a summary of the most salient ideas and themes that emerged for participants during the session.

References 

Conway, J. M., Amel, E. L., & Gerwien, D. P. (2009). Teaching and learning in the social context: A meta-analysis of service learning’s effects on academic, personal, social, and citizenship outcomes. Teaching of Psychology, 36, 233-245.

Hondagneu-Sotelo, P., & Raskoff, S. (1994). Community service-learning: Promises and problems. Teaching Sociology, 22, 248–254.

Yorio, P. L., & Ye, F. F. (2012). A meta-analysis on the effects of service-learning on the social, personal, and cognitive outcomes of learning. Academy of Management Learning and Education, 11, 9-27.


Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:15am PDT
Salon 1
 
Friday, June 19
 

8:30am PDT

CON10.05 - Breathing life into the syllabus: The collaborative development of a first-year writing course for nursing students
This session will describe and reflect on the ongoing multi-disciplinary collaboration that led to the creation and evolution of a writing course for baccalaureate nursing students at Fanshawe College. The diverse backgrounds of the presenters, a nurse and an English professor, illustrate this collaboration. We will briefly describe our initial study assessing the writing skills of nursing students in relation to the developing body of literature on the importance of these skills in nursing (Andre & Graves, 2013; Smith & Caplan, 2012; Troxler, Jacobsen Vann, & Oermann, 2011; Zorn, Clark, & Weimholt, 1997). Most importantly, we will also reflect on how we fine-tuned our pedagogical practices in light of our shared experiences teaching the course. As such, this session is relevant not only to writing and nursing educators but also to anyone who needs to address the writing needs of students in any program of study. There will be a strong, continuous interactive component, via such dialogue-inspiring techniques as think-pair-share, as we will invite participants to reflect on, discuss, and articulate strategies for building bridges between writing teachers and disciplinary experts. 

Participants will 

• describe the development of the writing course, including our initial study.
• share strategies and practices for assessing the writing needs of students in specific programs and designing curriculum to meet these needs
• reflect on these strategies and practices
• articulate problems, solutions, and new, innovative approaches


References

Andre, J.-A. D., & Graves, R. (2013). Writing requirements across Nursing programs in  Canada. Journal of Nursing Education, 52(2), 91–97.

Smith, Y. M., & Caplin, M. (2012). Teaching the literacy of professionalism: When clinical skills are not enough. Nurse Educator, 37(3), 121–125. 

Troxler, H., Jacobson Vann, J. C., & Oermann, M. H. (2011). How baccalaureate nursing programs teach writing. Nursing Forum, 46, 280–288. 

Zorn, C. R., Clark, W. J., & Weimholt, C. J. (1997). Educating the nurse scholar for the 21st century: How an interdisciplinary writing course can help. Journal of Nursing Education, 36, 244–249.


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Seymour Room

8:30am PDT

CON10.08 - Gesture-based teaching in the undergraduate L2 classroom
“Tuning into practice” for second language learners means functioning in the second language from the earliest possible stages of learning. This challenge is addressed in the beginning classroom by the AIM (Accelerative Integrated Method), an innovative second language teaching method which employs codified gestures to support L2-only interaction in the beginner classroom. In this interactive presentation, participants with an interest in undergraduate and adult L2 can experience a theoretical and practical introduction to the AIM, originally designed by B.C. Educator, Wendy Maxwell, for the teaching of French, Spanish, Mandarin and ESL in the K-12 system. The presenter will explore how and why one might want to adapt a K-12 approach to undergraduate and adult L2 learners and report on the presenter’s experience pioneering the AIM at the post-secondary level. Participants will experience the method as authentic beginners using a fictitious language. They will learn a limited inventory of codified gestures to use with other participants in a teaching role-play. They will be given a brief introduction to AIM theory and resources for illustrative and discussion purposes. The presentation will be supported by available research, which so far has focussed on K-12 (Mady, Arnott, Lapkin, 2009; Bourdages & Vignola, 2009, etc.). Participants will also hear preliminary results of groundbreaking research being conducted by the presenter on the use of the AIM in the presenter’s undergraduate classrooms. There will be an opportunity to reflect upon and discuss how the AIM might be adapted for use in participants’ own classrooms and disciplines. 

References:

Arnott, S. (2011). Exploring the dynamic relationship between the accelerative integrated method (AIM) and the core french teachers who use it: Why agency and experience matter. The Canadian Journal of Applied Linguistics, 14(2), 156-176.

Bourdages, J. S., & Vignola, M. (2008). Évaluation des habiletés de communication orale chez des élèves de l'élémentaire utilisant AIM. The Canadian Modern Language Review / La Revue Canadienne Des Langues Vivantes, 65(5), 731-755. 

Goldin-Meadow, S. (2003). Hearing gesture: How our hands help us think. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press. 

Mady, C., Arnott, S., & Lapkin, S. (2009). Assessing AIM: A study of grade 8 students in an Ontario school board. The Canadian Modern Language Review / La Revue Canadienne Des Langues Vivantes, 65(5), 703-729.


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Director Room

8:30am PDT

CON10.11 - The SoTL Canada symphony: Conducting the orchestra
SoTL Canada is a special interest group of STLHE that provides a targeted opportunity for SoTL scholars to form a community to share findings, to engage in opportunities for broader sharing of SoTL work, and consider ways to catalyze Scholarship of Teaching and Learning initiatives at the institutional, regional, national, and international levels. In this session we use the metaphor of conducting an orchestra to outline the development of this SIG from a few interested people to over 200 members in under three years. We draw on network theory (Verwoord & Poole, in press) and Wenger’s (1998) work on Communities of Practice to discuss lessons learned in developing the interests and attributes of individual ‘musicians’ into networks of orchestra sections and ultimately, working towards a full symphony. Just as a good tune can be appealing in multiple genres, we believe that through examining results from our recent membership survey, along with a brief account of the SIG development history, you will find passages that can be played and techniques that can be used in alternative SoTL development contexts. In small and large groups you will consider what principles are at play in this case study and how they might equally resonate in your own setting. The session will be facilitated in English; however, questions and discussion in French are encouraged.

References

Verwoord, R., & Poole, G. (in press). The role of small significant networks and leadership in the institutional embedding of SoTL. In N. Simmons (Ed.), The scholarship of teaching and learning in Canada: Institutional impact. New Directions in Teaching and Learning. 

Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice: Learning, meaning, and identity. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Salon 3

8:30am PDT

CON10.09 - Developing institutional learning and teaching frameworks – The Royal Roads University experience
An institutional learning and teaching framework defines and communicates the academic qualities that help give a university or college its unique identity. Most institutional frameworks combine research from the current literature on learning, teaching, and pedagogical innovation with an inductively-generated description of the educational principles, characteristics, or elements that guide learning and teaching within the specific institution. The development of these frameworks is becoming more prevalent worldwide as universities and colleges strive to define and preserve a unique institutional identity amidst the broader post-secondary landscape (Hamilton, Marquez & Agger-Gupta, 2013a). This paper begins with an exploration of the rationale for creating an institutional framework for teaching and learning as well as an overview of the potential benefits and challenges. Several examples of different approaches will be described. Next, through a series of integrative exercises, participants will (1) identify why they would want to develop an institutional framework, (2) explore their initial thoughts on what a framework might look like at their institution and (3) map out a potential development process. To guide these activities, a case study will be presented describing the “Learning and Teaching Mode (LTM)” that has recently been developed at Royal Roads University. This model has been presented to a number of national and international conferences (Hamilton, Marquez, & Agger-Gupta, 2013a, Hamilton, Marquez, & Agger-Gupta, 2013b). The case study will explore why the LTM was created, how the process unfolded, what activities are currently being carried out to support its implementation as well as what future directions are being explored. 

References

Hamilton, D.N., Marquez, P. & Agger-Gupta, N.(2013a). Institutional frameworks that support learning and teaching – The Royal Roads University experience. Presented at the Learning Congress, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC. June 7th.

Hamilton, D.N., Marquez, P. & Agger-Gupta, N. (2013b). Real life, real learning – The Royal Roads University experience. Paper presented at the International Congress of Distance Education 25th World Conference, Tianjin, China, October 16-20, 2013.


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Salon 1

8:30am PDT

CON10.13 - EAL writers as peer reviewers: Challenges and opportunities
It can be challenging to incorporate peer review in writing-curriculum design or renewal, especially with a significant English-as-additional-language (EAL) population. Students distrust peer review if they believe peers are weak writers, and EAL writers may not feel confident about their ability to provide “correct” feedback. In pre-professional programs such as business, peer review has not been widely adopted in writing courses (Rieber, 2010) even though students will need those skills in their working lives (Holst-Larkin, 2008). Proposing that peer review can enhance EAL students’ writing skills, professionalism, and confidence, we begin this session by describing why and how we incorporated peer review in three business-writing classes, each with a large EAL constituency. We then invite discussion to explore such questions as—How does peer review impact students’ revisions? Does peer review increase EAL students’ confidence in their feedback and writing? How do we help peers work through differences in language fluency? What value do students place on peer review? What do students and instructors learn? We conclude with a brief review of studies about the effects of peer-review on EAL writers (e.g. Choi, 2013; Vorobel & Kim, 2013), including early results from our research-in-process on this topic. Our experience will resonate with writing instructors and course developers considering or using peer review. Session participants will learn more about the challenges and opportunities of incorporating peer review, and will take away strategies to support EAL and non-EAL learners.

Choi, J. (2013). Does peer feedback affect L2 writers’ L2 learning, composition skills, metacognitive knowledge, and L2 writing anxiety? English Teaching, 68(3), 187-213.

Holst-Larkin, J. (2008). Actively learning about readers: Audience modelling in business writing. Business Communication Quarterly, 71(75), 75-80. doi:10.1177/1080569907312878

Rieber, L. J. (2010). Using peer review to improve student writing in business courses. Journal of Education for Business, 81(6), 322-326. doi:10.3200/JOEB.81.6.322-326

Vorobel, O. & Kim, D. (2013). Focusing on content: Discourse in L2 peer review groups. TESOL Journal, 5(4), 698-720. doi:10.1002/tesj.126



Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Cypress 2 Room

8:30am PDT

CON10.01 - Technology enabled learning: Transforming inter-professional ethics education in health and human service programs at the University of British Columbia
The health and human service programs at the University of British Columbia are in the process of planning, testing, and evaluating a framework for an integrated curricular approach to common learning. An ethics curriculum marks the first step in moving towards this integrated approach to health professional education. This curriculum supports learning that is unique to each profession, seeks economies of scale for foundational knowledge common to all programs through technology, and creates relevant opportunities for interprofessional learning in complex areas of healthcare (Mitchell et al., 2012). Using technology-enabled learning (TEL) to ensure asynchronous, flexible, interactive, and cost effective delivery (Pulman, Scammell, & Martin, 2009), the curriculum will transverse the classroom to practice continuum. The curriculum is unique in its integrated approach that incorporates interprofessional learning in an innovative way. The overarching goal of ethics curriculum is to graduate health professionals from all disciplines who can enact and provide leadership for ethical practice. The objective of this interactive session is to present the integrated approach that uses TEL for the delivery of common ethics content to multiple disciplines. This session will be of interest to faculty and educational developers seeking innovative ways to use TEL for interprofessional education. Presenters will briefly describe the development of the curriculum and demonstrate an online introductory module as a foundation for further learning in the curriculum. Participants will then in activities to get a sense of how online components support interactive face-to-face learning. Finally in small groups, participants will discuss how an integrated approach may compliment teaching in their respective fields.

References:

Institute of Medicine. (2012). Core Principles & Values of Effective Team-Based Health Care. Washington, DC: Mitchell, P., Wynia, M., Golden, R., McNellis, B., Okun, S., Webb, C. E., …Von Kohorn, I. Pulman, A., Scammell, J., & Martin, M. (2009). Enabling interprofessional education: The role of technology to enhance learning. Nurse Education Today 29, 232 – 239.

Speakers
VW

Victoria Wood (University of British Columbia)

Curriculum Developer, University of British Columbia
I have been working in the education field, focusing on interprofessional education and collaboration, for almost 10 years. I support the development and delivery of interprofessional curriculum across the continuum of learning, including university-based health science education... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Bayshore Salon ABC

8:30am PDT

CON10.02 - Flexible Learning strategies in Land, Food and Community series courses: Sharing our experiences
What does Flexible Learning (FL) mean to you? In this 45-minute interactive session, our teaching team will present how FL, an instructional approach allowing flexibility of time, place, and audience through the use of technologies (Khan, 2007), is integrated in the Land, Food and Community (LFC) series of courses in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia. We invite you to share your understanding and experience with FL strategies, which, for us, have been promoted and implemented for over a decade. FL has achieved success indicated by course evaluations and testimonies from students, the teaching team, and community partners (Rojas, 2009). We will focus on three themes: 1) objectives and designing process of using FL as pedagogical approach, 2) improvement and challenges in implementation, and 3) evaluation strategies. We will invite you to discuss each theme based on your engagement with FL in your specific context. Using a wiki page as the platform (a FL strategy we use regularly), you and the teaching team will collaboratively document our discussions. We will maintain this wiki page for further discussion and collaboration after the session ends. This session will showcase the various FL strategies applied in the LFC series courses, offer you first-hand experience with a FL strategy (wiki), and promote discussions among delegates who are interested in FL strategies and pedagogical reform in higher education. 

Key words: Flexible Learning, sharing experience, active learning strategies, community-based experiential learning 

References

Khan, B. H. (2007). Flexible Learning in an information society. Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Rojas, A. (2009). Towards integration of knowledge through sustainability education and its potential contribution to environmental security. In S. Allen-Gil, L. Stelljes, & O. Borysova (Eds.), Addressing global environmental security through innovative educational curricula (pp. 131–153). Springer Netherlands. Retrieved from http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4020-9314-2_14

Lead Speaker(s)
Speakers
avatar for Alice Cassidy

Alice Cassidy

Principal, In View Education and Professional Development
Alice Cassidy is an educational developer, science educator and wildlife biologist. She has designed, taught and coordinated courses at the University of British Columbia, and led large-scale educational programs. As a consultant, she leads workshops on teaching and learning. She... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Bayshore Salon D

8:30am PDT

CON10.06 - Incorporating flexible/blended learning into the Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW)
Training the teachers of tomorrow requires evolving professional development opportunities within the landscape of technology tools in education. The Instructional Skills Workshop (ISW) is a peer-based workshop that emphasises learner-centred teaching based around Kolbs experiential learning cycle (Dawson et al, 2014), providing pedagogy combined with the unique opportunity for ISW participant to teach 3 lessons and receiving facilitated peer feedback (Day 2004). Since the development of the ISW in 1978 the workshop has adapted to substantial changes in teaching and learning. Following the Flexible Learning Initiative at University of British Columbia and similar initiatives at other universities, a working group of ISW facilitators has been incorporating flexible/blended learning into the ISW to respond to the evolving needs of faculty and graduate student professional development given an increasing emphasis on blended and online learning in their teaching and learning practice. In this session we will share successes, difficulties, and opportunities incorporating Flexible Learning into the ISW. We will explore a planning and design process that moved away from traditional instructional design models and instead emphasized collaboration, open practice and iterative approaches to planning out the course revisions (Allen 2012). Attendees at this session will participate and engage in flexible/blended modes of instruction, providing a metacognitive approach to discussing applications of flexible/blended learning within the ISW, an internationally recognized 24 hour peer based teacher training workshop. Attendees will create and develop resources for Professional Development of flexible/blended pedagogies. Attendees will have access to shared open resources to apply to their practice.

Speakers
avatar for Judy Chan

Judy Chan

Education Consultant, Faculty Liaison, University of British Columbia
UBC
avatar for Lucas Wright

Lucas Wright

Open Strategist (Leave Appointment), BCcampus
UBC


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Thompson Room

8:30am PDT

CON10.04 - Metissage: Collaborative analysis of critical pedagogy in the classroom
The objective of this 45-minute interactive session is to share our experiences using metissage as a collaborative research method, deepening our understanding of the complicated nature of enacting critical pedagogical ideals in practice (Ellsworth, 1989). Metissage is known as a literary artifact, a theoretical construct, a literary strategy, and a research praxis (Chambers, Hasebe-Ludt, Donald, Hurren & Leggo, 2008). Collective metissage “braids” multiple interpretations of experiences, and attempts to affirm rather than negate difference (Chambers et al., 2008). Metissage provides a site of resistance to discourses which attempt to totalize experiences (Zuss, 2012), and places the concept of multiple subjectivities front and centre, as the autobiographical writings of the authors are “braided” together to highlight multiplicity of experience. Using feminist, post-structural theory, the analysis interrogates the traditional concepts of teaching/learning, voice, and Truth, as multiple voices are highlighted and reveal a whole which is greater than its parts. In our session, the researchers will perform salient excerpts from the metissage, allowing participants to experience the subjective nature of the metissage. After the performance we will create a discussion space to engage participants in a conversation regarding our individual and collective insights of the process and the braid itself. Participants will have the opportunity to reflect on how the subjectivities illustrated in the analysis may be relevant and parallel similar experiences in their experiences with teaching and learning. Participants will leave the session with a new understanding of how to explore and examine the impacts of critical pedagogy within the classroom.


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Mackenzie Room

8:30am PDT

CON10.10 - Tuning into original undergraduate research in classroom contexts
The Council for Undergraduate Research (2011) defines undergraduate research as “An inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate student that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline.” Undergraduate research has been identified as one of the high-impact educational practices, leading to gains in critical thinking skills, information literacy and communication skills (Kuh 2008; Lopatto 2010). Often people associate undergraduate research with honours projects and research assistantships available only to a few; however, if undergraduate research leads to learning gains, it should be available to all students at multiple points during their studies (Healey and Jenkins 2009). This workshop outlines one possible model that can be adapted to very different classroom contexts. Participants will learn about a scaffold for original undergraduate research used in a first-year writing class, a second-year psychology class, and a fourth-year literature seminar in Fall 2013. In each class students completed a research log. Each entry encouraged reflection on the research process. Students participated in poster sessions prior to their final papers/projects, so that we could frame research as a process of knowledge creation that should be presented publicly for peer review and critique. This session includes data about student attitudes towards research coming into the courses and their reflections on the research process at the end. We reflect upon challenges involved in embedding undergraduate research in classroom contexts. Participants will be encouraged to consider possibilities and challenges for undergraduate research in their own classes through activities during the session.

References

Council on Undergraduate Research. (2011). Retrieved January 7, 2015, from http://www.cur.org.

Healey, M. & Jenkins, A. (2009). Developing undergraduate research and inquiry. York: Higher Education Academy.

Kuh, G. (2008). High impact educational practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter. Washington, DC: AAC&U.

Lopatto, D. (2010). Undergraduate research as a high-impact student experience.” Peer Review 12 (2), 27-30.


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Salon 2

8:30am PDT

CON10.12 - Writing and publishing your scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL)
This 45-minute workshop will support participants in “tuning in” to the common issues that scholars of teaching and learning often encounter when writing up their SoTL inquiries for publication. Informed by the literature (Bernstein, 2011; Chick et al. 2014; Christopher, 2013; Smith, 2013) and their own experience as authors, reviewers and editors, the co-presenters will discuss important considerations in publishing SoTL work including breadth and appropriateness of literature review, clarity of methodology and methods, linking evidence and claims, and considering disciplinary-specific vs. general or interdisciplinary journals on teaching. These considerations will be actively explored in facilitated group discussions of case studies. This session will be of value to scholars who are new to SoTL inquiry, scholars who are relatively new to publishing in this field, and faculty developers who are facilitating SoTL at their institutions. 

References:

Bernstein, J.L. (2011). Identifying high quality SoTL research: a perspective from a reviewer. International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 5(1).

Chick, N.L., Cornell-Swanson, L., Lazarides, K., & Meyers, R. (2014) Reconciling Apples & Oranges: A Constructivist SoTL Writing Program. International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 8(2).

Christopher, A. N. (2013). Navigating the Minefields of Publishing. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 136, 85-99. 

Smith, R. A. (2013). Tell a Good Story Well: Writing Tips. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 136, 73-83.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Marquis

Elizabeth Marquis

McMaster University
Beth Marquis is an Assistant Professor in the Arts & Science Program and the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL).
avatar for Shannon Murray

Shannon Murray

University of Prince Edward Island
Shannon Murray is a professor of Renaissance Literature at UPEI, a 3M National Teaching Fellow (2001), and the Coordinator of the 3M NTF. For the past 15 years, she has facilitated the Faculty Development Summer Institute on Active Learning.
avatar for Janice Miller-Young (Mount Royal University)

Janice Miller-Young (Mount Royal University)

Director, Institute for SoTL, Mount Royal University


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Cypress 1 Room

8:30am PDT

CON10.03 - Enhancing pedagogy with open textbooks and other open educational resources
Open Educational Resources (OER) are educational materials that are licensed to allow others to reuse, revise, remix, redistribute, and retain them free of cost. Open textbooks are one kind of OER, allowing such activities with a published textbook. Beyond the significant cost savings to students and the ability to share knowledge widely, there are also enormous pedagogical benefits associated with using and creating OER and open textbooks. Open textbooks can improve learning outcomes, in part because the high cost of traditional textbooks has been shown to keep some students from accessing the course material (Hilton & Laman, 2012; Senack, 2014). Their adaptability also means that students are reading material tailor-made for their particular course context. Students can be involved in revising and improving open textbooks and other OER, an excellent learning opportunity that also empowers them to contribute to the curriculum of their own course and to the learning of many more people beyond (Yeung, 2014; Chemwiki Hyperlibrary Development). Such authentic assignments can encourage students to do their best work while connecting them with people outside the course doing work in that field. In this session participants will be introduced to several ways in which faculty are using and creating OER and open textbooks, and will brainstorm pedagogical benefits of doing so as well as potential drawbacks and how to address them. Participants can expect to gain ideas for how they might use and/or create OER in their own courses, for the benefit of their students as well as others.

Hilton III, J. & Laman, C. (2012). One college’s use of an open psychology textbook. Open Learning: The Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning 27 (3), 265-272. doi: 10.1080/02680513.2012.716657.

Senack, E. (2014). Fixing the broken textbook market: How students respond to high textbook costs and demand Alternatives. U.S. PIRG Reports. Retrieved from http://uspirg.org/reports/usp/fixing-broken-textbook-market 

Yeung, L. (2014, August 21). Wikipedia’s medical errors and one’ doctor’s fight to correct them. CBC News British Columbia. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/wikipedia-s-medical-errors-and-one-doctor-s-fight-to-correct-them-1.2743268

Chemwiki Hyperlibrary Development. (n.d.). U.C. Davis Chemwiki. Retrieved from http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Development_Details/Hyperlibrary_Development

Speakers
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching in Philosophy, Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver
Philosophy, OER, open textbooks, open pedagogy, accessibility


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Bayshore Salon EF

8:30am PDT

CON10.07 - Moving to the music: Promoting explicit memory in human neuroanatomy and physiology with song, dance and play
The study of human anatomy involves naming thousands of structures, and structural features while conceptually developing a three-dimensional arrangement to understand the physical relationships among them. Physiology is the integration of this structural knowledge with how components of the body function in isolation, in systems, and in unison. As such, the recollection and recital of structural names is only the beginning of orchestrating a rich understanding of how these structures harmoniously work together. The difficulty students have with explicit memory in these subjects is often related to the sheer volume of structures to remember combined with the complexity of learning anatomical language. To aid students in learning these complex structures, kinesthetic techniques, such as dance and play to music, help them to effectively acquire the fundamental knowledge of the structures and utilize it for higher order processing (Mobley & Fisher, 2014). This strategy has been effective for learning the cranial nerves (vital for our ability to see, smell, taste, smile, hear, etc.) and the brachial plexus (vital to our ability to use our upper limbs) – structures that students find particularly troublesome (Meyer & Land, 2005). In this 45 minute interactive session, participants will be encouraged to learn about anatomy through the movement and engagement exercises students used to acquire fundamental knowledge of the cranial nerves. Participants will also have the opportunity to make their own model of the brachial plexus and consider the use of these types of strategies in their own practice. 

References:

Meyer, J. H. F., & Land, R. (2005). Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge (2): Epistemological considerations and a conceptual framework for teaching and learning. Higher Education, 49 (3), 373 – 388. doi:10.1007/s10734-004-6779-5. 

Mobley, K., & Fisher, S. (2014). Ditching the Desks: Kinesthetic Learning in College Classrooms. The Social Studies, 105, 301 – 309. doi:10.1080/00377996.2014.951471.

Speakers
avatar for Richelle Monaghan (Wilfrid Laurier University)

Richelle Monaghan (Wilfrid Laurier University)

Assistant Professor, Head of Science Programming in Public Health, Wilfrid Laurier University


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:15am PDT
Chairman Room

9:30am PDT

CON11.11 - Learn to use the Delphi method to harmonize program competencies
Graduate students in chemical sciences at our institution may apply to participate in one of several NSERC CREATE programs that provide additional career-related training experiences. We have facilitated the designation of competencies relating to interdisciplinary research skills, knowledge, and attitudes to guide the program and to allow for formative and summative program and trainee evaluation. Determining competencies in this setting was challenging for two reasons: 1) a lack of literature on interdisciplinary research competencies, and 2) the need to harmonize a wide range of expert viewpoints, since stakeholders include research faculty and also industry and government professionals. We used a modified Delphi process based on the work of Gebbie et al. (2002), who designated competencies for health science programs. The Delphi method, frequently used in forecasting and policy making, is a method of communication for consensus building (Adler & Ziglio, 1996). The method is a two-stage process involving exploration and evaluation. The advantages of this method include the ability to build consensus within a group of people separated by geography and/or time. In this interactive session, we will discuss the range of possible contexts that may benefit from a Delphi study. Attendees will then participate in a mock Delphi process, using a hypothetical degree program as the sample context. At the end of the session, participants will decide whether a Delphi process may be useful in their own context and determine what adjustments to the process they would like to make to better suit their needs.

References

Adler, M., & Ziglio, E. (Eds.). (1996). Gazing into the oracle: The Delphi method and its application to social policy and public health. London, U.K: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Gebbie, K., Merrill, J., Hwang, I., Gupta, M., Btoush, R., & Wagner, M. (2002). Identifying individual competency in emerging areas of practice: An applied approach. Qualitative Health Research, 12(7), 990-999.


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am PDT
Salon 3

9:30am PDT

CON11.01 - Cultural assumptions about pedagogy and educational development
Having worked in more than one country, we (Celia and Vivian) have had cause to ponder the impact of culture on our perceptions, beliefs and practices as educational developers. Many of the people we work with have similar multicultural experiences, as higher education becomes increasingly globalized. We believe that recognizing and valuing cultural differences will enhance the quality of the academy, for international and domestic faculty and for their global students. We will share observations from our experiences of working abroad, for example, how ‘good’ pedagogy is sometimes culturally defined. Vivian will share stories from her work in Canada, England and Kenya including her thoughts about the authority of the teaching staff and the power balance in the teacher/student relationship, and how these are influenced by the expectations of students and the opportunities for graduates. Celia will discuss her experiences of leading teaching and learning units in both a British and Canadian university, including her observations about faculty expectations of what such a unit should and could achieve, the cultural differences that emerge from mandatory vs. optional faculty development, and how this impacts her work. Participants will be invited to share their own experiences with the group, and through dialogue, explore their own beliefs and assumptions. Together we will identify common themes, such as the extent to which pedagogy, teaching and learning are culturally prescribed, and consider the implications of these for the work of the academy.

Reference:

Popovic, C. (2010). Educational developers at home and abroad. Retrieved from: http://www.seda.ac.uk/research.html?p=7_1_1_1

Lead Speaker(s)
Speakers
avatar for Celia Popovic

Celia Popovic

Director Teaching Commons, York University
Susan Vail, associate vice-president teaching and learning at York University, has announced that Celia Popovic has been appointed to the position of director of York University’s Teaching Commons.“I am so pleased that Dr. Popovic will now have the opportunity to share her pedagogical... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am PDT
Bayshore Salon ABC

9:30am PDT

CON11.10 - The medium and the message: cMOOC as open professional development
The affordances between the tools we use to teach, how we learn to teach, and how we teach may not be in sync. For example, the notion of open education has been growing in prominence in higher education but often professional development opportunities to support open pedagogies happen in closed workshops or private online spaces for limited audiences. This session will examine a joint University of British Columbia faculty-staff project that utilized a connectivist Massive Open Online Course (cMOOC) framework for an online workshop on teaching with WordPress, an open technology. The cMOOC format was chosen so the content of the three-week workshop (teaching with an open platform) and the format of the course (open pedagogy) were aligned. Based on the theory of connectivism (Siemens, 2005), cMOOCs focus on the co-creation of curriculum and the development of connections between participants, so that knowledge acquisition and creation can continue even after a course is finished (Sadaatmand & Kumpulainen, 2014). Additionally, the open format allows for a wider participant base, expanding the kinds of experiences, approaches, and ideas included in a course. In this session participants will be introduced to the Teaching with WordPress cMOOC we designed, discuss in groups what benefits/drawbacks they can see to opening up professional development in this way, and brainstorm other ways to extend the reach and value of educational development. Participants can expect to leave with an understanding of cMOOCs as well as ideas for how they might open up professional development at their institutions.

References

Jobe, W., Östlund, C. and Svensson, L. (2014). MOOCs for Professional Teacher Development. In M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education Conference 2014. Chesapeake, VA: AACE. Retrieved from https://oerknowledgecloud.org/sites/oerknowledgecloud.org/files/proceeding_130997%20%283%29.pdf

Saadatmand, M., & Kumpulainen, K. (2014). Participants’ perceptions of learning and networking in connectivist MOOCs. Journal of Online Learning & Teaching, 10(1), 16-30. Retrieved from http://jolt.merlot.org/vol10no1/saadatmand_0314.pdf

Siemens, G. (2005). Connectivism: A learning theory for the digital age. Instructional Technology and Distance Education, 2(1), 3–10. Retrieved from http://itdl.org/journal/jan_05/article01.htm

Speakers
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching in Philosophy, Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver
Philosophy, OER, open textbooks, open pedagogy, accessibility
avatar for Lucas Wright

Lucas Wright

Open Strategist (Leave Appointment), BCcampus
UBC



Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am PDT
Salon 2

9:30am PDT

CON11.03 - Exploring educational leadership: People, networks, practices
Traditional understandings of universities emphasize formal, hierarchical, and discipline-based silos, overlaid by centralized managerial structures. However, universities are also beginning to be understood as complex systems produced by autonomous, interdependent networks of individuals who operate on the basis of what they understand to be their own interests, or that of their various cohort group. There is considerable evidence that effecting change within such systems is enormously difficult, but that increased awareness of the dynamic nature of leadership may enhance the chances of successful change. Educational leaders, focused on the improvement of teaching and learning in universities, function within and among such networks. These leaders may establish credibility within multiple local networks, and may learn to navigate the larger system; however, most acquire these skills the hard way – on their own, through trial and error and without a supportive network. Based on a study of educational leadership at one institution and a series of workshops held with leaders from Canada and the United States, participants in this session will explore the implications of emerging international research on the 'distributed leadership' model. Participants will discuss some of the fundamental patterns which shape leadership practice in post-secondary settings, reflect on their leadership efforts, and explore the role of networks in inspiring and sustaining – or in potentially limiting – leadership capacity in their respective institutions.

Astin, A. & Astin, H. (2000). Leadership reconsidered: Engaging higher education in social change. Battle Creek: Kellogg Foundation.

Bolden, R., Petrov, G., & Gosling, J. (2008). Developing collective leadership in higher education, final report. London: Leadership Foundation for Higher Education.

Roxå, T. & Mårtensson, K. (2008). Significant conversations and significant networks: Exploring the backstage of the teaching arena. Studies of Higher Education. Retrieved from http://www. kuleuven.be/duo/_pdf/JournalClubArtikels.pdf

Trowler, P., Saunders, M., & Knight, P. (2003). Change thinking, change practices. A guide to change for Heads of Department, Programme Leaders, and other change agents in Higher Education, LTSN Generic Centre.

Speakers
avatar for Erika Kustra

Erika Kustra

Chair, Educational Developers Caucus
Erika Kustra became an educational developer in 1999, beginning to facilitate sessions earlier during her graduate and postdoctoral work in physiological psychology. She has been the EDC Secretary, STLHE Newsletter Editor, and participated in EDC Action Groups. In the last six years... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am PDT
Bayshore Salon EF

9:30am PDT

CON11.08 - Arts and IC technology: Transforming ‘seminar’ teaching and learning
The objective of this session is to explore the value of educators incorporating ‘Arts’ and ‘Information and Communication Technology’ (ICT) approaches in seminar classes. At the end of the session participants will be prepared to (1) identify the value of ‘Arts’ and ‘ICT’ approaches in facilitating deep learning; (2) self-reflect on their experience with ‘Arts’ and ‘ICT’ approaches, and (3) identify an ‘Arts’ or ‘ICT’ approach to incorporate into their teaching practice. This interactive presentation explicates the author’s vision of leadership through innovative teaching approaches. The author argues that student learning is enhanced when the development of the course syllabus (Small, 2014) includes planning for the weekly integration of ‘Arts’ and/or ‘ICT’ approaches. Such a creative dance engages learners’ hearts, minds, and bodies with the transformative teaching role being one of facilitating deep learning, creativity, and meaning making (Feller et al., 2004; Macdonnell & Macdonald, 2011). ‘Arts’ approaches include visual arts, poetry, music, and additional creative expressions that challenge students to dialogue and critically reflect upon their feelings, thoughts, and actions within a framework of social justice and equity (Macdonnell & Macdonald, 2011). ‘ICT’ approaches promote meaningful learning, guided by constructivist learning principles (Paily, 2013). Included are blogs, wikis, podcasts, videos, internet, twitter, e-portfolios, texting, and film. The presentation will engage participants in several ‘Arts’ and ‘ICT’ approaches and reflective dialogue to generate a sense of the classroom experience of learners. Participants will be encouraged to identify one new ‘arts’ or ‘ICT’ approach to incorporate into their teaching practice. 

Feller, A., Jensen, A., Marie, D., Peddigrew, B., Clinchard-Speda, L., & Campbell, E. (2004). Quadrinity learning. Journal of Transformative Education, 2(3), 219-230.  doi:10.1177/1541344604265370

MacDonnell, J. & Macdonald, G.J. (2011). Arts based critical inquiry in nursing and interdisciplinary professional education: Guided imagery, images, narratives, and poetry. Journal of Transformative Education, 9 (4), 203 -212. doi:1177/1541344612441083

Paily, M.U. (2013). Creating constructivist learning environment: Role of “Web 2.0” technology. International Forum of Teaching and Studies, 9(1), 39-50. _x000D_
Small, D. (2014). Essay: Teaching adult students: Creating a syllabus. International Forum of Teaching and Studies, 10(2), 60-65.

Lead Speaker(s)
avatar for Geraldine Macdonald

Geraldine Macdonald

University of Toronto
Geraldine (Jody) Macdonald RN EdD is an Associate Professor, Teaching Stream at the Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto. She teaches community health nursing and facilitating learning in the undergraduate and graduate programs. She also enjoys provides service to the... Read More →

Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am PDT
Director Room

9:30am PDT

CON11.07 - Guiding students with extra feedback
Research shows that students tend to be overly optimistic about their learning, with the weakest students over-estimating their progress the most (Kruger & Dunning, 1999). This can hinder students’ academic success, as they have no reason to change their behavior if they believe they are already doing well. As instructors, we can mitigate this tendency by providing students with extra feedback, beyond the marks and comments they traditionally receive. This session will begin by describing several forms of supplementary feedback that could be useful in your courses. One simple approach is to provide students with realistic practice exams, and then discuss the rationale behind each answer (Strasser, 2003). Another method asks students to keep journals in which they reflect on their learning successes and difficulties (Pavlovich, Collins and Jones, 2009). Technology can also facilitate extra feedback. Purdue University’s “Signals” system displays color-coded “dashboards” on students’ cell phones to remind them whether they are following good study habits in each course (Pistilli & Arnold, 2010). Experiments at Brock University give students forward-looking guidance by forecasting their end-of-course grades while the course is still underway (Armstrong, 2013). We will then open the floor for discussion. What do you think of these extra feedback tools? Which ones would likely work, or not, in your own classes? What feedback techniques have you used or considered, and what success have you had?

Armstrong, M.J. (2013). A preliminary study of grade forecasting for students. Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education, 11 (2), 193-210.

Pavlovich, K., Collins, E., & Jones, G. (2009). Developing students' skills in reflective practice: design and assessment. Journal of Management Education, 33 (1), 37-58.

Pistilli, M.D., & Arnold, K.E. (2010). Purdue signals: mining real-time academic data to enhance student success. About Campus: Enriching the student learning experience, 15 (3), 22-24.

Strasser, S.E. (2003). Will this be on the exam? or, How to get students to study more. Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education, 1 (1), 155-158.



Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am PDT
Chairman Room

9:30am PDT

CON11.13 - Engaging international students in a technology-enabled, collaborative classroom: Shifting the dialogue from rhetoric to reality
Interest in international students has produced an ambitious research agenda in Canada, where it is estimated that they comprise ten percent of the country’s postsecondary population (Canadian Bureau for International Education, 2015). Although numerous queries contribute to this growing body of scholarship, few address the potential for classroom technology to transform the academic experience of international learners. To remedy this gap, Humber College has undertaken an initiative to measure the impact of a technology-enhanced, collaborative classroom on student engagement with a particular interest in levels of engagement among international learners. Student engagement as a locus of inquiry is derived from interdisciplinary scholarship that posits that the consistent demonstration of engagement-related behaviours is one of the greatest predictors of scholastic achievement (Kahu, 2013). It is broadly defined in our study as “the time and physical energy that students spend on activities in their academic experience” (Robinson & Hullinger 2008, p. 101). Although our study will measure levels of engagement among all students, our ultimate interest in international learners recognizes that this particular demographic continues to experience unique scholastic barriers in spite of institutional efforts to mitigate these challenges (Bartram, 2008). Consequently, this session will illuminate how Humber’s technology-enabled collaborative learning environments influence basic engagement-related behaviors among all Humber students, including our international student population. By the end of this interactive session participants will: (1) understand how the purposeful use of various classroom technologies, such as those used in our project, can contribute to student engagement among diverse groups of learners and (2) apply selected strategies to practice to shift the dialogue from rhetoric to reality. 

Bartram, B. (2008). Supporting international students in higher education: constructions, cultures and clashes. Teaching in Higher Education, 13(6), 657 – 668

Canadian Bureau for International Education (2015). Facts and figures: Canada’s performance in international education, 2014. Retrieved from http://www.cbie.ca/about-ie/facts-and-figures/

Kahu, E.R. (2013). Framing student engagement in higher education. Studies in Higher Education, 38(5), 758 – 773

Robinson, C. & Hullinger, H. (2008, November/December). New benchmarks in higher education: student engagement in online learning. Journal of Education for Business, 101 – 108


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am PDT
Cypress 2 Room

9:30am PDT

CON11.04 - Self study as a tool for reflective practice in science education: A cross-faculty collaboration
In 1965, Nature published an editorial called “Education and Change” by Alexander King. He wrote: “it is a chief task of our particular age to preserve the best of our past and incorporate it in a new and aspiring culture”. Fifty years later this is as true as ever, but with a subtle shift. King was referring to tensions in what to teach, while today his quote is especially relevant to questions about how we teach. The last 50 years have seen the introduction of technologies and teaching methods that are profoundly changing the way we teach. In parallel, new tools have been developed to quantify the effectiveness of teaching methods. Here, we present a complementary approach to navigating King’s tension: self-study (Loughran, 2005). Self-study is a methodology for reflective practice grounded in the philosophy that educators possess unique expertise at teaching in their own disciplines. The methodology provides a forum for collegial discourse on questions from teaching effectiveness, to purpose, and experience. In this workshop, we introduce our collaboration through the lenses of our own disciplines (Education, Biology). Participants will be introduced to the methods of self-study, including the role of the ‘critical friend’, and will participate in the process through writing, reflection, and discussion. We will wrap up with a discussion on the role of self-study and reflective practice in navigating the changing educational landscape. This workshop will provide interested participants with the model and tools needed to pursue their own self-study or reflective practice. 

King, A. (1965). Education and change. Nature, 206, 1078-1083.

Loughran, J. (2005). Researching teaching about teaching: Self-study of teacher education practices. Studying Teacher Education, 1, 5-16.


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am PDT
Mackenzie Room

9:30am PDT

CON11.05 - The power of introversion in higher education
It is likely that over a third of our students and our colleagues are introverted. However, according to Susan Cain, author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking (2012), introverts are dramatically undervalued, both inside and outside of our classrooms. The buzz generated by her work suggests how pervasive the impact of the phenomenon she refers to as the extrovert ideal has been—and yet, Cain believes we are “at the very beginning” in exploring possibilities for more effectively learning from and with one another (Grant, 2012). Reviewing and extending upon round table discussions of introversion at STLHE 2014, we will provide a more detailed overview of the introversion-extroversion spectrum, highlighting specific differences in preferences and tendencies, and probing implications for higher education. Participants will be invited to engage in a series of exchanges to explore strategies for increasing the inclusion of introverts in higher education. By wrestling with the topic from a variety of perspectives, we hope to identify ways we, as educators, might tune into our differences in more productive—and potentially more harmonious—ways. Cain’s continued work in this area makes a compelling case that we can do better to meet the learning needs of all of our students and to address our own needs, as educators. Participants will have an opportunity to partake in her Quiet Revolution, where contemplation is as valued as participation, where gregariousness is optional, and where both introverts and extroverts are able to do what they do best.


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am PDT
Seymour Room

9:30am PDT

CON11.02 - A stich in time! Quality assurance in course design & teaching in a research-intensive university
In the global higher education scenario new investments are being made towards the continued growth of online learning. Universities are required to prove that they are effective leaders and demonstrate their ability to compete in socio-economic terms to their corporate/community partners. As a result, quality assurance has become an imperative in academia. Empirical evidence on the effectiveness of quality assurance practices in academic settings is still emerging. Anecdotal evidence is a mixed bag that often points to a divide between formal rules and what gets done in the workplace. We argue that the relationship between quality assurance and enacted quality practice needs to be understood in the light of how formal organizational structures, as well as cultural characteristics and academic aims are balanced within working groups in universities. The session objective is to: 

- Demonstrate the value of Planning, Development, Production, Implementation and Evaluation (PDPIE) quality framework in course design and teaching in a variety of contexts – on-campus, blended, distance education offerings 
- Explore the relationship between quality assurance and educational improvement

We will use a set of activities to engage the participants to ask and answer questions around their institutional and departmental priorities, individual goal(s) in the path of redesigning courses, teaching, technology –integration, optimizing student engagement. This session welcomes a wide range of participants in teaching and educational development practice. The activities are designed to promote critical thinking on the key questions of what, how and why of quality assurance. 

References

Heap, J. (2013). Ontario's Quality Assurance Framework: A Critical Response. A Quarterly Review of Education, 44(3-4), pp. 203-218.

Houston, D. & Paewai, S. (2013). Knowledge, Power and Meanings Shaping Quality Assurance in Higher Education: A Systemic Critique, Quality in Higher Education, 19(3), pp. 261-282.

Mårtensson, K., Roxå, T. & Stensaker, B. (2014). Quality Assurance to Quality Practices: An Investigation of Strong Microcultures in Teaching and Learning, Studies in Higher Education, 39(4), pp. 534-545.


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am PDT
Bayshore Salon D

9:30am PDT

CON11.06 - Indeterminate roots and diminished sevenths: Exploring the functions of evaluation and assessment in teaching and learning using chord theory
An understanding of music theory is a fantastic advantage, as it allows us to appreciate the complexity of a given piece and to communicate musical ideas. Music theory also helps us understand how music works, along with the functions of the various components in a piece. In this interactive musical session, I playfully use music theory as a metaphor to explore the value and potential of evaluation and assessment as resources in a pedagogue’s toolkit, outlining the functions that these play in my own practice of teaching anthropology at the undergraduate level. While evaluation is summative and tends to focus on grades, the heart of assessment is much broader. It assists in student learning, helps pinpoint learners’ strengths and weaknesses, serves to improve teaching and program effectiveness, and plays a number of other roles in the learning and teaching process. Despite a sustained emphasis on the advantages of assessment in learning and teaching research, however, assessment’s underutilization and evaluation’s disproportionate prioritization are persistent leitmotifs in many undergraduate teaching and learning contexts. Using chord theory to delve into the root causes of the continued dissonance between research and practice in teaching and learning, I will delineate strategic structural reasons and outline some of the groundwork that is to be done at various levels in order for concordance to be achieved at our institutions. A small group sharing session will follow, where participants will be invited to assess the challenges identified, recognize further issues, and design concrete multi-level strategies for overcoming these.

SOME OF THE REFERENCES USED IN THE PRESENTATION:

ASTIN, A. W. (2012). Assessment for excellence: The philosophy and practice of assessment and evaluation in higher education. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

BROWN, S., & GLASNER, A. (1999). Assessment matters in higher education. Buckingham: Open University Press.

EARL, L. M. (2012). Assessment as learning: Using classroom assessment to maximize student learning. London: Corwin Press.

ROWLAND, S. (2000). The enquiring university teacher. Buckingham: Open University Press.


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am PDT
Thompson Room

9:30am PDT

CON11.09 - Deeper learning, increased student satisfaction and metacognitive gains through collaborative testing with immediate feedback
Assessment in post secondary education tends to be on an individual basis, despite the fact that having to express and explain reasoning, and reach consensus with colleagues are valuable skills in the workplace. Harmonizing these discrepancies can be achieved by introducing collaboration into evaluation, a technique that can be used even in large classes where multiple-choice tests tend to be the norm. 2-stage midterm exams, described by Gilley & Clarkston (2014), were used in very different programs, with overwhelmingly positive student review. We will provide preliminary experimental data, reporting on a new addition to collaborative testing: providing immediate feedback to students during collaboration. Using the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique (IF-AT) (Epstein, 2001), answers to questions are revealed using scratch cards. Groups of students have multiple chances to discuss, should their first answer be incorrect, with partial credit awarded for subsequent attempts. Self-assessment and self-learning are promoted with immediate feedback, important facets of metacognitive skill development that can lead to improved individual academic performance (Carvalho, 2010). In addition to boosting confidence, we hypothesize that providing feedback at a moment when students are most receptive for the guided answer also promotes retention, and substantially overcomes the drawbacks from mark inflation due to collaborative testing without feedback (Molsbee, 2013). Our hands-on session will include a simulation of the procedure by engaging participants in a collaborative setting with feedback, along with providing tips for implementation in your classroom. We will discuss the pros and cons of various protocol decisions to fine-tune this new practice.

References

Carvalho, M. K. F. (2010). Assessing changes in performance and monitoring processes in individual and collaborative tests according to students' metacognitive skills. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 22(7), 1107-1136.

Epstein, M.L., Epstein B.B., and Brosvic, G.M. (2001). Immediate Feedback During Academic Testing. Psychological Reports, 88(3 Pt 1), 889-894.

Gilley, B. H. & Clarkston, B. (2014). Collaborative Testing: Evidence of Learning in a Controlled In-Class study of Undergraduate Students. Journal of College Science Teaching, 43(3), 83-91.

Molsbee, C.P. (2013). Collaborative Testing and Mixed Results. Teaching and Learning in Nursing, 8, 22-25.


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am PDT
Salon 1

9:30am PDT

CON11.12 - Collegial supervision - turned upside down - using inter-vision to challenge the academy rethink their teaching and develop great communities of practice
Collegial supervision is a method based on observation & reflective dialogue among peers with the purpose of developing their and improving their teaching through interaction and collective introspection. This method develops both the individual teacher’s practice as well as the community of practice (Wenger, 2000). The method is inspired by Donald A. Schön and his concepts: Reflection-in-action and Reflection-on-action (Schön, 1995), Reflective Practice The method is known as collegial Inter-vision in Denmark and is used at several HEIs in Denmark. At Roskilde University we use collegial supervision (inter-vision) as a tool for teaching quality enhancement. We organize the supervision in groups of 3 peers who observe each other teach and conduct a specific type of reflective dialogue on the basis of the observations. The supervision dialogue is anchored in the specific observations with its departure in the observed teacher’s pre-chosen focal points. In the dialogue the teachers activate and challenge their knowledge base and meta-reflect on own teaching practices (Handal).

See a video clip of teachers in a collegial supervision situation
The objective of the workshop is: 

* To present collegial supervision and the experiences from Roskilde University using this method in HE teacher development

* Break down steps for participants to try in a small simulation and then reflect/discuss usefulness compared to current practices

* Discuss the benefits and challenges of collegial supervision as a tool for raising the quality of teaching in Higher Education.

References: 

Schön, D, (1995): Reflective Practice: its implications for classroom, administration and research, A public lecture given for the Dept. of Language, Literacy & Arts Education, The University of Melbourne. 

Handal, Gunnar & Peter Lauvås (2006) Vejledning og praksisteori, Klim.

Wenger, E. (2000) Communities of Practice and Social Learning Systems Organization May 2000 vol. 7 (2), pp 225-24

Wenger, E. (1998) Communities of practice: learning, meaning, and identity (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press)


Friday June 19, 2015 9:30am - 10:15am PDT
Cypress 1 Room