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Achieving Harmony: Tuning into Practice

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Wednesday, June 17
 

11:15am PDT

CON01.04 - Play it: Impacts of experiential learning and authentic assessment in undergraduate music theory
This presentation describes an innovative redesign of undergraduate music theory curricula, which traditionally rely on written exercises for assessment, to feature hands-on music making at the piano as a central component of the instructional design (implemented following Wiggins and McTighe 1998). Using technology, students learn experientially (following Kolb 1984) and aurally through activities that apply their theoretical understanding to creative tasks at the highest levels of Bloom's taxonomy (Anderson and Krathwohl 2001), such as improvisation and composition. Quantitative and qualitative results from an impact study completed in fall 2013 are shared, which show not only a marked impact on how (and how well) students learned music theory, but also a dramatic expansion of what (i.e., which skills) they acquired in the course and a positive shift in their attitudes about the value and relevance of music theory. Broadly speaking, this curricular innovation produced far more significant learning results (in the sense of Fink 2013). This study responds to an ongoing dissonance between the applied, artistic matters of musical performance and the academic, systematic tasks of music theory. By learning about this pedagogical intervention and its documented results and engaging in a dialogue about them, participants will be able to articulate the value of creative activities and applied, authentic assessment to the teaching and learning of highly technical and systematic concepts. Though focused on disciplinary teaching within music theory, the presentation emphasizes findings that can be applied just as well in other pedagogical fields.

Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (Eds.). (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching and assessing: A revision of Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives. New York, NY: Longman.

Kolb. D. (1984). Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Fink, L. D. (2013). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am PDT
Chairman Room

11:15am PDT

CON01.05 - Are there perks to being a Twitter wallflower? Exploring peripheral Twitter participation in public relations education
Increasingly, instructors at all academic levels and across a variety of disciplines are introducing social networking tools in their classes – likely in response to the participatory culture that has evolved from the Web 2.0 technology that has nurtured a generation of “digital natives” (Prensky, 2001). As a social media instructor, I witnessed young people engaged in social networking as a “living technology” (Kennedy, Judd, Churchward, Gary & Krause, 2008, p.119), facilitating their social lives, but were reticent when asked to migrate to the social networks that have become the “learning technology” (Kennedy, et. al., 2008) of the classroom. Kennedy, et. al. (2008) has described the migration from living to learning technologies as neither automatic, nor guaranteed (p. 119), resulting in non- and peripheral participation among students, despite the digital native rhetoric, and the situated learning opportunities afforded by the publicness of the tool. At Humber College, public relations (PR) students are encouraged to use a Twitter hashtag, #humberpr, which has evolved into an online community of practice, where students, faculty and industry experts intersect. My research explores the experience of the PR student who remains on the periphery of #humberpr, including: negotiation of power dynamics; barriers to the migration from a living to a learning technology; and the learning of the peripheral player. Although focused on PR students, my findings should prove relevant to educators across all disciplines. 

Kennedy, G.E., Judd, T.S., Churchward, A., Gray, K., & Krause, K-L. (2008). First year students’ experiences with technology: Are they really digital natives? Australasian Journal of Educational Technology. 24 (1), p 108-122. Retrieved from: http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet24/kennedy.html

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants, Part 1. On the Horizon. Sept-Oct. 2001. 9 (5), (pp. 1-6). Retrieved from http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/prenskyper cent20-per cent20digitalper cent20natives,per cent20digitalper cent20immigrantsper cent20-per cent20part1.pdf


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am PDT
Director Room

11:15am PDT

CON01.01 - Investigating the influence of learning attitudes on students' choice of major
Less than a year in to their university experience, students are faced with perhaps the most important decision of their undergraduate careers: their choice of major. While universities and departments invest significant time and effort in curriculum design, course design, advising, and outreach activities intended to support students in their choice, previous work has shown that students’ attitudes towards a discipline at the beginning of first year - prior to any of these interventions - can substantially influence their choice of major. This presentation will share the results of a recent investigation of how students’ attitudes towards chemistry change over the course of their first year, and how attitudes, academic achievement, and pedagogy may combine to influence students’ choice of major. The investigation was based on the analysis of a large database of students’ grades, majors, and responses to a widely used attitudinal survey administered at the beginning and end of each first-year term. We also conducted a series of focus groups with 1st and 2nd year students to develop a more complete understanding of influential factors, including how pedagogy impacts students’ perceptions of a scientific discipline. Although the present work focuses on grades and attitudes in chemistry, the tools, processes, and general trends of this investigation should be applicable to any learning discipline. This work was carried out with the ultimate goal of guiding recruitment and retention efforts to bring them into better harmony with the factors that bear the greatest influence on students’ decisions.

Barbera, J., Adams, W. K., Wieman, C. E., & Perkins, K. K. (2008). Modifying and Validating the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Use in Chemistry. Journal of Chemical Education, 85(10), 1435. doi:10.1021/ed085p1435

Perkins, K. K., & Gratny, M. (2010). Who Becomes a Physics Major? A Long-term Longitudinal Study Examining the Roles of Pre-college Beliefs about Physics and Learning Physics, Interest, and Academic Achievement. Physics Education Research Conference, 1289(1), 253–256. doi:10.1063/1.3515214


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am PDT
Mackenzie Room

11:15am PDT

CON01.02 - Research on teaching philosophy statements from a learning perspective
Teaching philosophy statements have become a vital document that allow people to quickly know an individual's beliefs about teaching and learning, along with their intended practices. Research on teaching philosophy statements (e.g., Kaplan et al., 2007; Schönwetter, et al., 2002) reveals a range of criteria and resulting rubrics and frameworks to develop and evaluate quality statements. These rubrics outline criteria for graduate students to use for self-assessment during the writing process as well as for those hiring, mentoring, and giving feedback. In this presentation, we report on an interdisciplinary research project that looked for evidence in a sample of 80 teaching philosophy statements of a deep learning/student focused approach to teaching (Trigwell & Prosser, 2004) as well as disciplinary differences. Statements were written by graduate students from a range of disciplines participating in a 35-hour seminar on teaching and learning. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used in coding and analyzing the same data set with agreement and disagreement found in the data. We are now at the stage of verifying core categories that emerged during qualitative analysis and seeking explanations in the literature. The aim of our session is to present ways of evaluating an individual’s beliefs about teaching from a learning perspective.

Kaplan, M., Meizlish, D., O’Neal C., & Wright M. C. (2007). A research-based rubric for developing statements of teaching philosophy. In D. R. Robertson & L. B. Nilson (Eds.), To improve the academy: Resources for faculty instructional and organizational developers, 26, 42–262. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons.

Schönwetter, D.J., Sokal, L., Friesen, M. & Taylor, K.L. (2002) Teaching philosophies reconsidered: A conceptual model for the development and evaluation of teaching philosophy statements, International Journal for Academic Development, 7(1), 83-97.

Trigwell, K. & Prosser, M. (2004). Development and Use of the Approaches to Teaching Inventory. Educational Psychology Review, 16(4), 409-424.

Speakers
avatar for Arshad Ahmad

Arshad Ahmad

Associate Vice-President, Teaching and Learning & Director, MIIETL, McMaster University
Dr. Arshad Ahmad is the Associate Vice-President Teaching and Learning and Director of Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL) at McMaster University. He is the Past Coordinator of the 3MNTF program and a 3M National Teaching Fellow. He is the Past... Read More →
avatar for Janette Barrington

Janette Barrington

Associate Director, Educational Development, McMaster University
Janette Barrington is Manager, Strategic Initiatives, McMaster Institute for Innovation & Excellence in Teaching & Learning (MIIETL). She holds a PhD in Educational Technology and is actively involved in research on interdisciplinary perspectives on teaching and learning in higher... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am PDT
Seymour Room

11:15am PDT

CON01.10 - Student diversity in context: Structural factors enhancing the composition of classrooms and classroom dynamics‏
Frequent and appropriately structured classroom interactions between students with diverse life experiences have been shown to have positive learning outcomes (Chang, Astin, & Kim, 2004; Denson & Bowman, 2013; Gurin, Dey, Hurtado, & Gurin, 2002; Nelson Laird, 2005). However, factors influencing student composition at the course level (rather than faculty or school level) have remained largely unexplored. To this end we examine organizational factors enhancing classroom diversity. Much sociological thought acknowledges the significance of multiple ways of seeing and knowing, making a systemic analysis of factors influencing classroom diversity particularly relevant for sociological teaching. In this paper we consider student enrollment trends in Introduction to Sociology courses at University of British Columbia from 2004 to 2013 based on student academic year level, degree program, admission average, age, gender, international/domestic status, and citizenship. We examine course composition in relation to course medium (online or face to face), term placement (summer or winter), number of credits (3 or 6) and other relevant characteristics. Our preliminary findings suggest that structural factors alter classroom diversity composition in particular ways and should be taken into account in creating positive learning environments conducive to student enrichment. During the session we will engage participants in a discussion about their own teaching experiences in relation to these findings. By the end of this session, participants will be able to articulate three factors influencing student composition at the course level. 

References: 

Chang, M. J., Astin, A. W., & Kim, D. (2004). Cross-racial interaction among undergraduates: Some consequences, causes, and patterns. Research in Higher Education, 45(5), 529‑553.

Denson, N., & Bowman, N. (2013). University diversity and preparation for a global society: the role of diversity in shaping intergroup attitudes and civic outcomes. Studies in Higher Education, 38(4), 555-570. 

Gurin, P., Dey, E., Hurtado, S. & Gurin, G. (2002). Diversity and higher education: Theory and impact on educational outcomes. Harvard Educational Review, 72(3), 330-366.

Nelson Laird, T. F. (2005). College students’ experiences with diversity and their effects on academic self-confidence, social agency, and disposition toward critical thinking. Research in Higher Education, 46(4), 365‑387.

Speakers

Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am PDT
Cypress 2 Room

11:15am PDT

CON01.09 - Harmonic progression: Adapting an evaluation tool for online courses to a new setting
Evaluating online learning involves evaluating educational design, technology use, and “online instructional practices that integrate technology appropriately for developing and delivering quality online courses” (Bangert, 2008, p. 28). Research shows that classroom-based evaluation tools do not adequately capture the relationships between content, pedagogy, and technology in online courses (Berk, 2013). In response to this evidence, the Faculty of Arts and Science, which offers a large variety of online courses and programs, sought an alternative to the collective agreement-endorsed, university-wide evaluation tool, which is designed for classroom learning. An instrument developed by Bangert (2004) to assess constructivist-compatible online teaching practices, the Student Evaluation of Online Teaching Effectiveness (SEOTE), was adapted and piloted in 2014. The evaluation tool, like a harmonic chord, has different meanings in different contexts, some of which are discordant. This presentation explores those contexts, and explains the process by which consonance was achieved over two pilot phases. Using Stobart's (2009) validity framework as a guide, this process included negotiations with the university’s faculty association, statistical analyses of the data, and student and instructor focus groups to ascertain the tool’s usefulness. Audience members will be stimulated to consider factors that differentiate effective evaluation of online courses from classroom-based teaching. They will gain insight into strategies for introducing a new evaluation tool in a unionized environment, and methodologies for evaluating the tool itself. During the presentation, the audience will be invited to brainstorm items on which an online instructor/course could be assessed, which will then be compared to the SEOTE.

References:

Bangert, A. W. (2008). The development and validation of the student evaluation of online teaching effectiveness. Computers in the Schools, 25 (1-2), 25–47.

Bangert, A. W. (2004). The seven principles of of good practice: A framework for evaluating online teaching. The Internet and Higher Education, 7(3), 217–232.

Berk, R. A. (2013). Face-to-Face versus Online Course Evaluations: A “Consumer's Guide" to Seven Strategies. Journal of Online Learning & Teaching, 9(1). http://jolt.merlot.org/vol9no1/berk_0313.htm

Stobart, G. (2009). Determining validity in national curriculum assessments. Educational Research, 51(2), 161–179. doi:10.1080/00131880902891305



Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am PDT
Cypress 1 Room

12:00pm PDT

CON02.12 - Deploying autonomous project teams in educational development
Educational development work is necessarily driven by and aligned to institutional priorities in learning, teaching and curriculum development (Gibbs, 2013). In practice however, Educational Developers also need to respond to emerging priorities, arising needs and serendipitous opportunities as and when they present themselves (Gosling, 2009; Roche, 2003). The variable nature of such issues requires balancing a setting of medium to long-term direction with strategies which are emergent and unplanned. The concept of autonomous project teams (e.g., Clark & Wheelwright, 1992) within organizational effectiveness research offers insights into how we can respond effectively and efficiently with existing personnel to meet new challenges. Through this lens, we have examined one Centre’s approach to structuring tasks, problem solving, accountability, and collaboration to uncover how and why this approach works within our context. Additionally, we offer insight into how an infrastructure of autonomous project teams can be created and implemented and we identify ways to facilitate that process. During this presentation, we will share our experiences and initial outcomes of a study of use of this strategy by one educational development unit and invite colleagues attending to see their practice through the lens of autonomous project teams, and evaluate fit with their context and structure.

Clark, K. B., & Wheelwright, S. C. (1992). Organizing and leading “heavyweight” development teams. California Management Review, 34(3), 9-28.

Gibbs, G. (2013). Reflections on the changing nature of educational development. International Journal for Academic Development, 18(1), 4-14. 

Gosling, D. (2009). Educational development in the UK: a complex and contradictory reality. International Journal for Academic Development, 14(1), 5-18.

Roche, V. (2003). Being an agent of change. In Kahn, P. & Baume, D. (Eds.), A guide to staff and educational development (pp. 171-191). London: Kogan Page.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Hoessler

Carolyn Hoessler

Program and Curriculum Development Specialist, GMCTE at the University of Saskatchewan
Carolyn Hoessler (Program and Curriculum Specialist) is a program and curriculum development specialist with 8 years of educational development experience. Her areas of specialty and focus include supporting faculty with curricular innovation, assessment of program outcomes, program... Read More →
avatar for Nancy K Turner (University of Saskatchewan)

Nancy K Turner (University of Saskatchewan)

Director, Teaching and Learning Enhancement, University of Saskatchewan


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Cypress 2 Room

12:00pm PDT

CON02.03 - Australian universities’ use of learning analytics for increased student retention
As learning analytics utilizing “big data” relating to student performance become more sophisticated, individual teaching academics are being encouraged to leverage this rich information for the improvement of student success and the student experience (Beer, Jones & Clark 2012, Ferguson 2012, Clow 2013). This presentation reports findings from a national, federally-funded study including 29 Australian universities and over 400 university teachers, determining the maturity of the universities’ implementation of learning analytics for the improvement of student retention. Data was collected via an institutional level survey, an academic level survey and semi-structured interviews of teaching academics. Twenty-two institutions and over 350 teaching academics from across Australia responded to the institutional/individual surveys relating to their use/intentions for use of Learning Analytics data for the purposes of student retention and success. Survey and interview findings reveal that the use of analytics is embraced more actively by senior university leaders and teaching and learning and institutional research professionals than by individuals teaching in the classroom. Recommendations will be made relating to the increased readiness, encouragement and engagement of university teachers in learning analytics with student retention as an outcome. Participants will engage in a structured activity considering a formal model for universities’ implementation of learning analytics for student retention. They will be asked to determine the maturity level of their institutions in the use of learning analytics as well as how they feel that their own role and experience affects their view of the analytics wave that is changing how we support students worldwide. 

Beer, C., Jones, D., & Clark, D. (2012). Analytics and complexity: Learning and leading for the future. In M. Brown, M Hartnett & T. Stewart (Eds.), Future Challenges, Sustainable Futures (proceedings ASCILITE, Wellington, 2012), (pp.78-87). Retrieved from http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/ wellington12/ 2012/images/custom/asclite2012_proceedings.pdf

Clow, D. (2013). An overview of learning analytics, 

Ferguson, R. 2012. Learning analytics: Drivers, developments and challenges. International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 4(5/6), 304–317. doi:10.1504/IJTEL.2012.051816


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Mackenzie Room

12:00pm PDT

CON02.11 - Exploring the impact of a fall break policy on student mental health outcomes
Increasing attention is being paid to the mental health of university and college students as they report higher levels of stress and anxiety than that of the general population (Stallman, 2010). As mental illness commonly develops between the ages of fifteen and twenty-four (Eisenberg, Golberstein, Gollust, & Hefner, 2007) post-secondary students are at particular risk. In fact, the higher stress levels associated with being a first year university student alone lead to higher dropout rates than either anxiety or depression (Tamin, 2013). Many universities across Ontario are implementing a policy for a fall break in hopes of alleviating students’ stress and anxiety in order to improve mental health, heighten retention, and increase academic productivity. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of an educational policy change to institute a fall break on student stress and retention. A mixed methods methodology is used to collect self-reported qualitative and quantitative indicators of stress and academic achievement along with objective measures of academic achievement and retention using a three-year longitudinal cross-sectional survey design. The Fall Break did decrease students overall stress. Students agree the break was beneficial, that workload did not increase as a result of the break (before or after) and that stress did not increase as a result. The group reporting the greatest benefit was first year students. This research provides comprehensive evidence regarding the utility of a Fall Break to reduce stress and increase retention in order to inform effective education policies in this respect.

Eisenberg, D., Gollust, S. E., Golberstein, E., & Hefner, J. L (2007). Prevalence and correlates of depression, anxiety, and suicidality among university students. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 77(4), 534-542.

Stallman, H. M. (2010). Psychological distress in university students: A comparison with general population data. Australian Psychologist, 45(4), 249-257.

Tamin, S. K. (2013). Relevance of mental health issues in university student dropouts. Occupational Medicine, 63(6), 410-414.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Cypress 1 Room

12:00pm PDT

CON02.02 - An analysis of the quality of student-led asynchronous discussions in on-line and blended learning courses
In this study we examine the pedagogical value of student-led asynchronous on-line discussions used in a first-year undergraduate Criminology class at Simon Fraser University. The course is offered in both distance education and blended-learning (includes weekly two-hour lectures) formats. Once during the term, each student produces an on-line presentation (PowerPoint format - no voice over or camera required) and two discussion questions and is also responsible for facilitating student discussion. Each student is also an assigned discussant for four different presentations during the course. In 2013, students were invited to complete an on-line survey regarding student perceptions of the delivery of this course. Our project emerged during our analysis of the 2013 survey which showed that not all students were fans of the online presentations and discussions. As instructors and teaching assistants we wanted to evaluate our perceptions because we felt that for the most part, the on-line discussions were of considerably higher quality than what we had experienced leading traditional first-year tutorials in-person discussions. The on-line discussion posts were often well-edited, thoughtful, engaging, and evidenced critical thinking. Despite the fact that students didn’t necessarily agree (Paechter & Maier 2010), our research findings support the value of well-designed and moderated asynchronous discussions in an on-line educational setting (Andresen, 2009). Finally, we address study-specific implications and advantages for EAL (English Additional Language) students and the use of on-line tutorial technology (Zeng & Takatsuka, 2009; Dang & Robertson, 2010). Opportunities for audience feedback and questions will be encouraged throughout. 

References:

Andresen, M. A. (2009). Asynchronous discussion forums: Success factors, outcomes, assessments, and limitations. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 12(1), 249-257.

Dang, T. T., & Robertson, M. (2010). Pedagogical lessons from students' participation in Web 2.0. [Article]. TESOL in Context, 20(2), 5-26. 

Paechter, M., & Maier, B. (2010). Online or face-to-face? Students' experiences and preferences in e-learning. The Internet and Higher Education, 13(4), 292-297. doi:10.1016/j.iheduc.2010.09.004

Zeng, G., & Takatsuka, S. (2009). Text-based peer–peer collaborative dialogue in a computer-mediated learning environment in the EFL context. System, 37(3), 434-446.

Speakers
SF

Sheri Fabian

Dr. Sheri Fabian is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Criminology at Simon Fraser University. Her teaching and research focus on minorities and justice, qualitative research methods, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. She is a mentor for the graduate student Certificate... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Bayshore Salon EF

12:00pm PDT

CON02.07 - Building a harmonious and effective community of learners: The challenges of fostering peer interaction in online courses
Creating situations to promote effective interaction between students in online courses presents a greater challenge than in the face-to-face environment of traditional classrooms. Yet, because interaction is a key component of learning, we need to find effective ways to implement it in the online environment. As others have pointed out, “the main vehicle of communication in an online learning community is online discussion.” However, to be successful, those involved in online discussion need the opportunity to communicate with one another. That is, they need to work together as a community. According to M. Moallem, ”a community of learners cannot exist if its members do not care for and understand each other’s feelings.” Given that students practically never see each other’s facial expressions in the online environment, this presents a particular challenge. Promoting a successful community of learners in computer-facilitated courses therefore requires careful consideration. Responding to these challenges, this presentation will focus on ways to promote communication. We will discuss 2 strategies that were implemented in an on-line course on Paris: 1. The creation of a discussion forum where students uploaded their assignments and subsequently commented on the work of their peers; 2. The creation of working groups through which the foundational principles of collaboration were established. Students were then provided with opportunities to contribute to the creation of a community of learners. After presenting their findings, the presenters will initiate an interactive discussion, inviting those interested to share their views on the challenges of online interaction.

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (1999). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The internet and higher education, 2(2), 87-105.

Moallem, M. (2003). An interactive online course: A collaborative design model. Educational Technology Research and Development, 51(4), 85-103.

Yuan, J., & Kim, C. (2014). Guidelines for facilitating the development of learning communities in online courses. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 30(3), 220-232.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Director Room

12:00pm PDT

CON02.04 - Tuning in on tacit knowledge

Tuning in on teaching practice in any discipline may well run up against a problem of tacit knowledge--knowledge crucial to the discipline’s ways of thinking and practicing, but by nature obscure. Teachers who omit to make their tacit knowledge explicit in the classroom cause learning bottlenecks for their students. Tacit knowledge can be made explicit to its teacher owner, with positive effect on her teaching, in an interview that invites her to address how she thinks and practices in work her students, lacking her tacit knowledge, find impossible to master (Middendorf & Pace, 2004). We have conducted half a dozen such 90-minute to two-hour interviews with university teachers in different disciplines. We present qualitative analyses of those interviews which find across disciplines common themes and elements in teachers’ tacit knowledge and common impacts on teachers’ practice and thinking when tacit knowledge becomes explicit. Quoting from our interviews, we show through different analytical lenses, including phenomenology and narrative identity theory, how teachers regardless of discipline gravitate to intrinsically hermeneutic understandings of their disciplines, instinctively value provisionality of judgment, assume crucial disciplinary relationships of parts to wholes, embody in Heideggerian terms their ways of thinking and practicing (Van Manen, 1990), implicitly trust key disciplinary processes, willingly inhabit liminal spaces and, in recalling how they came to the understandings their students find so difficult to master, surface crucial aspects of their professional identities. We seek discussion with our audience of the effects on teaching and learning of unearthing and variously analyzing tacit knowledge across many disciplines.

Middendorf, J. & Pace, D. (2004). Decoding the disciplines: A model for helping students learn disciplinary ways of thinking. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 2004(98), 1-12. 

Van Manen, M. (1990). Researching lived experience: Human science for an action sensitive pedagogy. Albany, NY: State of New York Press.



Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Seymour Room

12:00pm PDT

CON02.06 - My students are revolting! The use of humour as a classroom management strategy
Conflicts, disengagement and silos are realities that teachers face. There many ways to address these challenges; one of the most often employed, but least studied strategies is the use of affiliative humor (Avolio, Howell & Sosik 1999; McCartney-Matthews 2011). Recent events have highlighted the way that humour can be a point of unity or division.

The presenter has worked in a variety of post-secondary settings, from large research universities to small private schools to polytechnics. These schools have been in North America, Southeast Asia, and Eastern Europe. Humour was always a strategy employed to address classroom management. Now as a member of a faculty development team there has been an opportunity to conduct deeper study into how and why humour works to bring learners together.

This session will explore the benefits of instructor usage of positively-valenced humour in the classroom, focusing on its ability to reduce barriers between the instructor and learner, as well as between learners. The presenter will draw from prior research on the role of humour in organizations and educational anthropology (Collins 2012; Treece 2010; Vogler 2011). The audience will not leave with a list of knock-knock jokes, but they will gain an insight into how humour might be used to strengthen enhance engagement and improve classroom management.

Avolio, B.J., Howell, J.M. & Sosik, J.J. (1999) A funny thing happened on the way to the bottom line: Humor as a moderator of leadership style effects. Academy of Management Journal 42(2), 219-227.

Collins, P.E. (2012). Leading higher education organizations: The role of humor. MA Thesis. Gonzaga University.

McCartney-Matthews, M.L. (2011). A funny thing happpened on the way to the hippocampus: The effects of humor on student achievement and memory retention. EdD Dissertation. Arizona State University.

Treece, B.P. (2010). Humor as a desired leadership quality compared across four professional fields in Findlay and Hancock County, Ohio. EdD Dissertation. Northcentral University.

Vogler, W.B. (2011). Humor and work: Toward a more contextual understanding of humor in the workplace. PhD Dissertation. Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Logan (SAIT Polytechnic)

Jeff Logan (SAIT Polytechnic)

Faculty Development, SAIT Polytechnic


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Chairman Room

12:00pm PDT

CON02.05 - Using role-immersion games like the 'Reacting to the Past' series in larger classes
Historical simulations have long if infrequently been used in classrooms, and recently a much more intense variation, promoted by the 'Reacting to the Past' consortium, has been advanced. Using terms like role-playing and role-immersion to distinguish them from much tamer versions (model UNs and the like) of the practice, these games have been touted as producing a large number of benefits and postive outcomes for students. However, the games were originally developed for classes at Barnard (NY), and are often designed for no more than about 20 students at a time. Over the last four years I have adapted one extant game and designed two role-immersion games, using them six times in first-year history classes of 80 students. I will discuss what mechanisms I have used including modifications of game rules as well as the use of factions and faction leaders, speaking rules, character descriptions, and indeterminate factions. I will also discuss the relative degrees of success, and my plans for the future.

Carnes, Mark C. (2014). Minds on Fire: How role-immersion games transform college. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674735354

Flaherty, Colleen. (2014, August 27). “Minds on Fire.” Inside Higher Ed. https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/08/27/book-advocates-reacting-past-pedagogy

Lang, James. (2014, September 29). "Stop Blaming Students for Your Listless Classroom: How the Use of Games as a Teaching Methodology Has the Potential to Break the Long History of Student Disengagement in College Learning." (Part 3) The Chronicle of Higher Education.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Thompson Room
 
Thursday, June 18
 

3:00pm PDT

CON07.03 - Tuning into the practice of first year foundations courses
In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to student transitions and the first year university experience (Crisp et al., 2009; Nelson, Smith & Clarke, 2012). Innovative pedagogies designed to ease transition, promote engagement, and help students develop foundational skills have been implemented with varying degrees of success (Levy & Petrulis, 2012; Nelson et al., 2011). This 30-minute presentation will tune into practice that supports transition by engaging participants in interactive discussion about one innovative course aiming to improve the first-year experience. Social Sciences 1T03 is a blended (online & face-to-face), Foundations Course that was introduced at McMaster University in September 2014. The course aims to provide students with an overview of Social Sciences fields and the learning skills needed to succeed at university. Among the key skills that students develop in the course are critical and reflective thinking, study habits, time management, and conflict resolution. The small size of tutorials and the learning activities employed facilitate connections between first-year students and the Faculty, University, and broader Hamilton communities. A longitudinal research project has been launched to explore the impact of Social Sciences 1T03 on participating students and to determine whether the course is meeting its objectives. Students’ academic achievement, skill development, and perceived integration into the McMaster community are assessed through online surveys, focus groups, and academic data (such as course and term GPAs). Attendees will learn about preliminary findings from this study and discuss potential applications for curriculum design related to easing first-year transitions and developing foundational skills. 

References:

Crisp, G., Nettelbeck, T., Sarris, A., Palmer, E., Ward, L. Strelan, P., Turnbull, D., LeCouteur, A., & Schneider, L. (2009). First year student expectations: Results from a university-wide student survey. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 6(1), 13-26.

Levy, P., & Petrulis, R. (2012). How do first-year university students experience inquiry and research, and what are the implications for the practice of inquiry-based learning? Studies in Higher Education, 37(1), 85-101.

Nelson, K.J., Smith, J.E., & Clarke, J.A. (2012). Enhancing the transition of commencing students into university: an institution-wide approach. Higher Education Research & Development, 31(2), 185-199.

Nelson, K.J., Quinn, C., Marrington, A., & Clarke, J.A. (2011). Good practice for enhancing the engagement and success of commencing students. Higher Education, 63(1), 83-96.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Marquis

Elizabeth Marquis

McMaster University
Beth Marquis is an Assistant Professor in the Arts & Science Program and the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL).


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm PDT
Mackenzie Room

3:00pm PDT

CON07.01 - Teaching controversial issues: A pilot workshop
This presentation describes a pilot workshop designed to support Faculty of Arts instructors interested in fine tuning their approaches to teaching controversial subject matter. Critical thinking and democratic engagement skills are frequently cited as graduate attributes for liberal arts programs, and conversations about controversial issues can provide a strategic site for the development of these skills (Brookfield & Preskill, 2005; Hess, 2009). However, as the university is increasingly populated by informed, political, diverse students who are engaged learners, questions of what might count as controversial and for whom arise (Flinders University, n.d.), along with potential classroom management challenges for instructors (Fournier-Sylvester, 2013). This case-study based workshop was designed and delivered by two faculty members, the director of a university equity office and an educational development consultant. In this session, a description of the pilot and its context, and lessons learned from its evaluation will be presented. Discussion of why and how we might best support faculty across a range of disciplines in their teaching of controversial issues will also be invited. By the end of the session participants will be able to:
• Discuss the rising importance of offering support for the teaching of controversial subjects in the post secondary setting
• Identify context-specific issues and approaches to fine tuning teaching practices on controversial topics within various disciplines
Recent public debates about free versus hate speech suggest that our teaching practices around controversies stand to make a difference well beyond the academy. As the conference theme suggests, providing a classroom space for controversies to occur can be transformative for ourselves and our students.

References:

Brookfield, S.D., & Preskill, S. (2005). Discussion as a way of teaching: Tools and techniques for democratic classrooms. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Flinders University. (n.d.). Theory into practice strategies: Inclusive practices for managing controversial issues. Retrieved from http://www.flinders.edu.au/equalopportunity_files/documents/cdip/TIPS_controversial.pdf_x000D_

Fournier-Sylvester, N. (2013). Daring to debate: Strategies for teaching controversial issues in the classroom. College Quarterly, 16(3), 1-7. 

Hess, Diana E. (2009). Controversy in the classroom: The democratic power of discussion. New York: Routledge.

Speakers
CB

Carol Berenson (University of Calgary)

Educational Develpment Consultant, University of Calgary


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm PDT
Bayshore Salon D

3:00pm PDT

CON07.12 - Faculty perceptions of the impact of professional development: Interculturalizing the curriculum
A variety of demographic shifts has resulted in increased cultural diversity in our classrooms leaving many educators challenged to deliver course content the ways they may have previously. This presentation will outline a research inquiry into the impacts of an intensive professional development program: Interculturalizing the Curriculum. In this session the presenters will outline the program features and share the findings of their mixed methods study. The Interculturalizing Curriculum has been delivered to 4 interdisciplinary cohorts between 2008 and 2013, with a total of 60 faculty participants. The program consists of several days of professional development based in intercultural and pedagogical theory in order to support individual faculty to make shifts to their curriculum and delivery. The aim of the program is to provide faculty with intercultural and indigenous frameworks and pedagogical strategies that may enhance both their ability to work with culturally diverse learners and to incorporate intercultural and global learning outcomes in their coursework. The purpose of this research project was to gain an understanding of faculty perceptions of the impact of the program to them personally, professional, and to their learners. Close to 40% of past participants consented to be part of the research. We used a mixed methods approach to data gathering: a likert scale online questionnaire, peer video interviews, and individual interviews. The findings are promising and contribute to the field of professional development in education. 

Deardorff, D. K. (2011). Assessing intercultural competence. New Directions for Institutional Research, (149), 65-79. 

Kuokkanen, R. (2007). Reshaping the university: Responsibility, indigenous epistemes, and the logic of the gift. Vancouver, BC: University of British Columbia Press. 

Lee, A., Poch, R., Shaw, M.,& Williams, R. (2012). Engaging diversity in undergraduate classrooms: A pedagogy for developing intercultural competence. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 38, Number 2.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm PDT
Cypress 2 Room

3:00pm PDT

CON07.02 - The leaking pipeline: Can empathy help to reduce attrition in STEM?
Seymour (1997) discusses how numerous studies have found that the apathetic environment found in STEM classrooms is the most frequently cited reason students leave. This chilly environment is typified by a feeling that faculty don't care about students and that students are not 'gifted' enough to be successful in these fields. Student confidence and motivation are critical issues that need to be addressed, and we believe we can make a difference. Tinto (2006) states that faculty engagement, especially in first year courses, is critical to enhancing student retention. We report on a web-based learning tool that allows students to work through a number of problem-based active learning activities that coincide with each week’s content. In our course, topics build upon each other, and it is important to identify and support students that fall behind early. To support student confidence, the tool provides a pressure-free environment to investigate the material, step-by-step hints, and support for further questions. Veletsianos (2014) reminds us that simply replacing the medium in which material is presented, without changing the underlying practices of instruction, will have little impact on learning. Our tool collects usage data, allowing us to revisit problems, and to answer all of the student’s questions areas before progressing onto new material. This helps to show we do care about their success. Through a preliminary qualitative assessment, we report on the impact our approach has had with respect to student confidence, metacognition, and the ability for an individual to envision success in computer science. 

Seymour, E., & Hewitt, N. M. (1997). Talking about leaving: Why undergraduates leave the sciences (Vol. 12). Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Tinto, V. (2006). Research and practice of student retention: what next?.Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice, 8(1), 1-19.

Veletsianos, G. (2014). The significance of educational technology history and research. eLearn, 2014(11), 1.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm PDT
Bayshore Salon EF

3:00pm PDT

CON07.07 - Finding a middle (MOOC) ground: Making space for a global community in the xMOOC
Dave Cormier first introduced the term Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) in 2008 and since then this ‘disruptive innovation’ has seen an increase both in the number of platforms and certainly in the number of course offerings. While it may be too early to properly measure the disruptive impact MOOCs have had, there is no denying that they have sent shock waves across higher education (Shirky, 2012). Whether as a response to budget constraints and efficiency seeking initiatives or as a gateway to innovative practices, MOOCs continue to create a large digital footprint on a global scale. At least two different pedagogical directions have emerged within the MOOC landscape (Rodriguez, 2013): content-based MOOCs (xMOOCs) often take a behaviourist, teacher-centered approach that is the target of numerous critiques, whereas connectivist MOOCs (cMOOCs) leverage autonomy, openness, connections and interactivity. cMOOCs seek to facilitate learning communities that come together in the exploration and discussion of topics of mutual importance. At the same time, cMOOCs have also been critiqued for their potential to alienate the novice online learners that a MOOC might attract (Brennan, 2013). Borrowing from the strengths of both MOOC approaches - that is, fostering meaningful connections between learners while accommodating a large and diverse audience of varying skill levels - was a key consideration in designing McMaster University's first MOOC on Coursera, Experimentation for Improvement. In this presentation, we will outline design decisions around the pedagogy, interface and learner experience that were implemented in the development process and as the course was being delivered in the summer of 2014. We will also speak to steps the design team took towards being inclusive of the global audience that a MOOC is able to reach. Participants will leave the session with several strategies for building community in large online courses while working within the constraints of an xMOOC platform or LMS.

Brennan, Keith (2013). In Connectivism, No One Can Hear You Scream: A Guide to Understanding the MOOC Novice. Retrieved from: http://www.hybridpedagogy.com/journal/in-connectivism-no-one-can-hear-you-scream-a-guide-to-understanding-the-mooc-novice/

Rodriguez, O. (2013). The concept of openness behind c and x-MOOOCs. Open Praxis, 5(1), 67-73.

Shirky, C. (2012). Napster, Udacity, and the Academy. Retrieved from: http://www.shirky.com/weblog/2012/11/napster-udacity-and-the-academy/


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm PDT
Director Room

3:00pm PDT

CON07.13 - Knowing the land beneath our feet: Integrating a digital Indigenous walking tour into University of British Columbia classrooms
In this talk, we share our experiences piloting a digital Indigenous walking tour with over 300 undergraduate students. Knowing the Land Beneath Our Feet (KLBF) is a digitally-augmented walking tour of the University of British Columbia’s Vancouver campus, researched and designed by Spencer Lindsay and Sarah Ling with advisors from academic and Indigenous communities on the traditional, unceded, ancestral territory of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ speaking Musqueam people. Using Global Positioning Systems built into cellphones, KLBF augments the University of British Columbia environment with stories, videos, photographs and text drawn from archives and interviews with community members and elders. While the tour is designed for a range of users, this presentation focuses on students’ learning experiences. University of British Columbia Vancouver is marked by a longstanding engagement with Indigenous communities and cultures, but this continued presence remains invisible to the majority of students. This situation is not unique to University of British Columbia. Throughout Canada, Ashok Mathur argues, “if there is any awareness of First Peoples and their inhabitation and proprietorship of this land, it is most frequently mediated through colonial narratives of contact” (3). By sharing Indigenous narratives of the land, KLBF’s pedagogical design provides students the opportunity to connect their learning to local contexts and make their classroom experiences more relevant to their everyday lives. Students engage with campus sites that tell stories, encode values, and point the way to respectful relationships with Musqueam and other First Nations. The tour asks participants to, in Paulette Regan’s words, “learn to listen differently” (15) to Indigenous histories and to reconsider their own histories and their place on this territory. During our session, we demonstrate how students navigate the tour and show examples of sites they visit. We share challenges and successes in how we integrated this technology into our course designs, blended in- and beyond-the-classroom learning environments, identified learning objectives and assessed these objectives through activities and assignments. More broadly, we reflect on the ways that digital campus walking tours might contribute to students’ deeper appreciation and understandings of Indigenous histories and issues in colonized and contested spaces (see Claxton, Loft and Townsend 2005; Loft 2014). 

Claxton, D., Loft, S., & Townsend, M. (Eds.). (2005). Transference, tradition, technology: Native new media. Hamilton: Walter Phillips Gallery Editions. 

Loft, S. (Ed.). (2014). Coded territories: Tracing Indigenous pathways in new media art. University of Calgary Press.

Mathur, Ashok, Jonathan Dewar, and Mike Degagné (Eds). (2011). Cultivating Canada: Reconciliation through the lens of cultural diversity. Aboriginal Healing Foundation Research Series. 

Regan, Paulette. (2011). Unsettling the Settler Within: Indian Residential Schools, truth telling, and reconciliation in Canada. University of British Columbia Press.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm PDT
Bayshore Salon ABC

3:00pm PDT

CON07.04 - Creating a framework and supports for Scholarship of Teaching and Learning research projects
At our university, we support small grants for Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) projects. Our team is seeking to address the concern that prospective SoTL investigators may not have sufficient relevant methodological perspective and/or expertise to approach SoTL questions, and thus certain designs are over/under-utilized and/or not well-suited to the inquiry at hand. To address this, we have reviewed 120 of our small grant projects, harmonizing them into a single framework, and developing accompanying support materials. The framework includes quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and conceptualises projects according to their research purposes (exploratory or testing), project types (e.g., design, evaluation), data sources, and participant selection/recruitment methods. Drawing from our own SoTL experiences and disciplinary backgrounds (Education and Statistics), we have sought to make this framework practical and understandable to SoTL researchers across disciplines. The materials accompanying the framework facilitate informed choices regarding the relative suitability and implementation of different research designs by providing practical advice and suggestions as well as resources for further reading. We will share an abridged version of our framework and accompanying materials with participants and we will engage participants in an activity in which they will apply our framework to their own question(s). Attendees will develop a deeper and wider understanding of the range of methodologies that can be used to address SoTL questions, as well as some of the theoretical, practical, and methodological considerations that should inform their choice(s).

Speakers

Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm PDT
Seymour Room

3:00pm PDT

CON07.06 - ‘Threshold concepts’, dissonance and disorientation in transformative learning: Exploring student encounters with ‘troublesome knowledge’ in Introductory Sociology
One of the most exciting aspects of teaching is seeing students challenged - and changed - by the ideas they encounter. As Mezirow (1991) stated, transformative learning typically involves a period of significant disorientation, prompting students to question and reject previous beliefs. While unsettling at the time, this destabilising experience of dissonance and discomfort ultimately generates transformative learning, achieved when the temporary uncertainties resolve into a stable, new understanding. Within sociology, a key concept encountered early on – the ‘sociological imagination’ - frequently challenges students in this way, before leading them to transformative ‘epiphanies’ (e.g. Haddad and Lieberman, 2002). Seeing this take place repeatedly in my own Introductory Sociology classes enabled me to identify the sociological imagination as an especially significant ‘threshold concept’ within the discipline (Meyer and Land, 2003) and, using this conceptual framework, I began exploring how students traverse this particular threshold in their learning. Using a CATS-inspired approach (Angelo and Cross, 1993), I ask students to complete weekly in-class writing tasks for the duration of the course, which form a cumulative ‘learning dossier’. This serves to document changes in their thinking, as they grapple with developing their own sociological imagination. In this presentation I will explain the development of my research with reference to Meyer and Land’s theory and invite audience members to identify ‘threshold concepts’ in their own field that could be explored using a similar approach. I will conclude by encouraging discussion of the implications of some of my research findings for our everyday teaching practices.

Key words: threshold concepts, transformative learning, the sociological imagination, CATs

References: 

Angelo, T. and K.P. Cross (1993) Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers (2nd ed.) San Francisco: Jossey-Bass

Haddad, A. and Lieberman, L. (2002) ‘From student resistance to embracing the sociological imagination: unmasking privilege, social conventions and racism.’ Teaching Sociology 30: 328-341

Meyer, J. and R. Land (2003) ‘Threshold Concepts and Troublesome Knowledge: Linkages to ways of thinking and practising within the disciplines.’ In C. Rust (ed.) Improving Student Learning: Improving Student Learning Theory and Practice Ten Years On Oxford: Oxford Brookes University

Mezirow, J. (1991) Transformative Dimensions of Adult Learning San Francisco: Jossey-Bass


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm PDT
Chairman Room

3:00pm PDT

CON07.09 - Peer review of teaching: Program evaluation results
Fueled by global concerns about the quality of student learning experiences and the effectiveness of university teaching, there has been increasing attention to the evaluation of teaching in a broad array of institutional and disciplinary contexts in higher education (Arreola, 2007; Harris et al., 2008). The University of British Columbia has long recognized the importance of attending to the evaluation of teaching practices. However, the enactment of a campus-based approach and localized scholarship directed at these practices remains very much in its infancy. In 2008, a working group was tasked with developing principles and procedures for the formal summative evaluation of teaching, to inform decision making regarding re-appointment, promotion and tenure at University of British Columbia. During 2010-2011, the working group initiated a program to train nominated representatives from each Faculty in the principles and practice of the summative peer review of teaching (SPRT) process. Those faculty members have been actively involved as leaders of the SPRT Initiative and have helped design and implement customized Peer Review of Teaching (PRT) processes within the 12 Faculties at University of British Columbia. In the fall of 2013, CTLT designed a survey to evaluate the implemented PRT programs at University of British Columbia. The survey was distributed through SPRT Faculty representatives and was open between the dates of February 11 and March 4, 2014. 100 responses were received in total from 8 Faculties. In this session we share an overview of the PRT Initiative at University of British Columbia, and the qualitative and quantitative results from the survey, from the viewpoint of reviewers and reviewees.

• Arreola, R. A. (2007). Developing a comprehensive faculty evaluation system: A guide to designing, building, and operating large-scale faculty evaluation systems (3rd ed.). Bolton, MA: Anker.

• Harris, K-L., Farrell, K., Bell, M., Devlin, M., & James, R. (2008). Peer review of teaching in Australian higher education: A handbook to support institutions in developing effective policies and practices. Australian Learning and Teaching Council Publication.

Speakers
avatar for Simon Bates (University of British Columbia)

Simon Bates (University of British Columbia)

Senior Advisor, Teaching and Learning | Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology., University of British Columbia
STLHE conference co-chair | Professor of Teaching in Physics and Astronomy at UBC, currently designing a new intro course for first year Physics students.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm PDT
Salon 2

3:00pm PDT

CON07.05 - The rewards (& risks) of alternative assignments for senior students
In senior level English courses (3rd and 4th year), I have often provided an opportunity for students to submit a project – a “creative alternative” - in lieu of a formal essay. The rough criteria for these projects involves: 1. engaging with the course material; 2. being theoretically and intellectually rigorous and 3. presenting that engagement with the material in a creative way. Beyond those broad guidelines, students individually propose and negotiate their project’s format with the instructor. Historically, the benefits of this type of learner-centered approach have increased student motivation (Hong, Milgram, & Rowell, 2004), discouraged plagiarism (Cummings, 2003) and increased learning in traditionally difficult subjects (Guilaran, 2012). In my courses, students have turned in everything from quilts, to paintings, to cookbooks, to videos, to food…the list is as long as it is varied. The educational and personal reward (for the students and myself) has been outstanding, though there are some important pedagogical issues at stake, including how to establish the assessment criteria in an equitable manner and how to manage any overly-personal revelations that might occur. In attending this workshop, participants will be inspired by several examples of student’s creative projects; gain insight into how to incorporate them within their own discipline; learn about the types of educational and personal rewards that they offer; and dialogue about the various challenges they pose with emphasis on assessment criteria and negotiating difficult emotional terrain.

Hong, E., Milgram, R., & Rowell, L. (2004). Homework motivation and preference: a learner-centered homework approach. Theory into Practice, 43(3), 198-204. http://www.jstor.org.libproxy.wlu.ca/stable/3701521?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

Cummings, K. (2003). Pushing against plagiarism through creative assignments. Library Media Connection. 21(6), 22-23. Cummings, K. (2003). Pushing against plagiarism through creative assignments. Library Media Connection. 21(6), 22-23.

Guilaran, I. (2012). Creativity and introductory physics. The Physics Teacher. 50(42), 42-44. http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.3670085


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm PDT
Thompson Room

3:45pm PDT

CON08.01 - From learning outcomes to competencies to careers: A case study of a team based approach to curriculum redesign
Universities and Colleges are under increasing pressure to provide real-world relevance or ‘skills’ to their undergraduates to increase student success and transition into the workforce. This is especially crucial for programs in Humanities and Social Sciences. In support of the development of these ‘skills’, some institutions and faculties have mandated curriculum redesign through the development of program learning outcomes and competencies that are applied to curriculum mapping across courses in the program. Some institutions are also increasing experiential learning opportunities for students, supporting e-portfolios, and increasing career services. These projects are often developed in isolation from each other, with faculty working on course redesign, staff on experiential learning opportunities and career counselling, and administrators finding funding. This session will provide a case study of an integrated project in the Faculty of Arts at University of British Columbia where staff, faculty and experiential educators work together to redesign curriculum through the development of learning outcomes and competencies which are mapped to existing curriculum. Enriched educational experiences—such as capstone community based research courses, field courses and e-portfolios—are being integrated into curriculum. The intention is that students in this program will build skills and competencies as they go through their undergraduate degree, and will have opportunities for structured reflection on this learning so they build the capacity to see and represent themselves as young professionals with unique expertise. We aim to graduate students who feel empowered about their futures, clear on the potential of their degrees, and confident about the transition out of university.

Abner, B., Bartosh, O., Ungerleider, C., & Tiffin, R. (2014). Productivity Implications of a Shift to Competency-Based Education: An environmental scan and review of the relevant literature. Toronto: Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario.

Klein-Collins, R. (2012). Competency-based degree programs in the U.S. Postsecondary credentials for measurable students learning and performance. Council for Adult and Experiential Learning. Retrieved fromhttp://www.cael.org/pdfs/2012_CompetencyBasedPrograms

Zubizarreta, John. “The Learning Portfolio: A Powerful Idea for Significant Learning.” IDEA Center: Idea Paper #44. Manhattan, Kansas. 2008.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Bayshore Salon ABC

3:45pm PDT

CON08.03 - Multiple stakeholder perspectives on the value (and challenges) of community-based experiential learning in human services-oriented programs
Community-based experiential learning opportunities, such as student projects and placements within community organizations (CACSL, 2014; Moon, 2004), are highly valued by undergraduate recreation students (Powell, Johnson, Anderson & Paisley, 2013), but they also describe these experiences as time-intensive, harried, and stressful (Johnson & Pate, 2013). The purpose of this project is to explore possibilities for less resource-intensive experiential experiences, (from the perspectives of students as well as faculty and community organizations) while expanding opportunities for student-centred skills development and reflection . Interviews and focus groups are currently underway to capture the multiple perspectives of key stakeholder groups; preliminary results are based on: interviews with academics who have designed experiential learning initiatives (n= 10), debriefing with practitioners who have facilitated experiential learning for students (n = 4), and focus groups with undergraduate recreation students (n = 17). All stakeholder groups valued experiences: (a) that provided opportunities for students to develop practical work and interpersonal skills, (b) when students were actively supported in their learning (e.g., through onsite mentoring, debriefing) and (c) when there was a shared understanding of the purpose/goals of the students’ involvement. Unique perspectives were also evidenced, such as, for students, the importance of achieving a sense of ‘closure’ when the project ended. All noted multiple challenges, including: the time required to develop and maintain relationships, constraints of sustaining partnerships across academic terms, and matching student abilities and needs to community needs. This session will provide opportunities to discuss these challenges (and those experienced by delegates), and will facilitate discussion of approaches to community-based experiential learning that may help to address these issues.

Canadian Alliance for Community Service-Learning (CACSL). (2014). Web site accessed February 25, 2014 at www.communityservicelearning.ca

Johnson, C.W., & Pate, J.A. (2013). Three course connections: Integrated event design. Schole: A Journal of Leisure Studies and Recreation Education, 28(1), 32-43.

Moon, J.A. (2004). A handbook of reflective and experiential learning: Theory and practice. New York: RoutledgeFalmer.

Powell, G.M., Johnson, C.W., Anderson, D., & Paisley, K. (2013). Together we can: Integrated program design in recreation and leisure studies education. Schole: A Journal of Leisure Studies and Recreation Education, 28(1), vii – xiii.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Bayshore Salon EF

3:45pm PDT

CON08.02 - Contextualized academic development: Facilitating change in teaching and learning practices
“If we are to move forward with a more holistic academic development practice, … an approach that … respects the expertise and experience of our disciplinary colleagues” is critical (Wuetherick and Ewert-Bauer, 2012). So concluded a paper in a recent 2012 special issue of the International Journal for Academic Development that used postcolonial metaphors to explore the ‘decolonization’ of academic development. What does this mean for academic development practices and the institutional positioning of academic development centres? What does it mean for the day-to-day practices of academic developers in those Centres who are positioned in the ‘margins’ between academic disciplines and central administration (Little and Green, 2012)?_x000D_ This presentation, building on two parallel mixed methods studies of academic developers (on the one hand) and faculty (on the other), seeks to unpack issues related to both the strategic positioning of academic development centres and individual academic development practices that are historically affirming, culturally not alienating, philosophically localized, linguistically inclusive, epistemically and epistempologically validating, and developmentally sensitive and responsive (Wuetherick and Ewert-Bauer, 2012). In particular, this research presentation explores how a more holistic and contextualized academic development practice, at both the individual academic developer and the Centre level, might help address the challenges associated with the gap between the growing literature that explores 'evidence-based' teaching and learning practices in higher education and the reality that many of our disciplinary colleagues still have not begun adopting these 'evidence-based' practices. The presentation also will focus on exploring how one particular model of change, the transtheoretical model of the stages of change, might inform academic development practice to facilitate change in teaching and learning practices in higher education (Hazelton, Murphy and Lightfoot, 2014; Randhawa, 2012).

References:

Wuetherick and Ewert-Bauer (2012). “Perceptions of Neutrality through a Post-Colonial Lens: Institutional Positioning in Canadian Academic Development,” International Journal for Academic Development. 17 (3), 217-229.

Little D., and Green D. (2012). Betwixt and between: Academic developers in the margins, International Journal for Academic Development, 17 (3), 203-216.

Hazelton L., Murphy C., and Lightfoot, K. (2014). Remediation Practices in Canadian Psychiatry Clerkships. Academic Psychiatry, 38, p. 350-353.

Randhawa S. (2012). . The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 43 (4), 148-149.

Speakers
avatar for Brad Wuetherick

Brad Wuetherick

Executive Director, Learning and Teaching, Dalhousie University
Brad Wuetherick is the Executive Director, Learning and Teaching at Dalhousie University, and is an active researcher in teaching and learning in higher education in areas including undergraduate research, educational development, SOTL, facilitating change in teaching and learning... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Bayshore Salon D

3:45pm PDT

CON08.12 - Assessment of the teaching assistant preparation program (TAPP)
Teaching assistantship has an important role in the development of teaching capacity among graduate students. However, educational development strategies must be in place to facilitate this development (Boman, 2013; Hardré & Burris, 2012). Furthermore, as highlighted by Gardner and Jones (2011), the design of educational development initiatives tailored at developing teaching capacity among graduate student must consider the uniqueness of teaching assistantship experiences in each discipline. With these points in mind, a teaching assistantship preparation program (TAPP) was designed, consisting of workshops offered by the Educational Development Unit of the University of Calgary, working sessions tailored to a specific Faculty (Werklund School of Education), and debriefing sessions where participants were invited to reflect upon how the knowledge developed during those sessions could be enacted in their upcoming postsecondary teaching practice. At the end of the first year of implementation of the program, a case study research was conducted to assess impacts TAPP had on the development of the teaching capacity among graduate students who participated in the initiative. Findings from this research will be used to redesign the program, as well as to provide recommendation for similar projects currently being offered at other postsecondary institutions. The goal of this session is to present preliminary findings of the research, highlighting how lessons learned from this experience are informing the next iteration of the program and can impact the design of similar programs. To achieve this goal, participants will be invited to discuss how findings from this research can guide practice in their own institutions. By joining this session, participants will reflect on potentialities and challenges of implementing a teaching assistantship preparation program, as well as insights from their experiences with similar initiatives.

References:

Boman, J. S. (2013). Graduate Student Teaching Development : Evaluating the Effectiveness of Training in Relation to Graduate Student Characteristics. Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 43, 100–114.

Gardner, G. E., & Jones, M. G. (2011). Pedagogical Preparation of the Science Graduate Teaching Assistant: Challenges and Implications. Science Educator, 20, 31–41. Retrieved from http://proxy-remote.galib.uga.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=67370874&site=eds-live

Hardré, P. L., & Burris, A. O. (2012). What contributes to teaching assistant development: Differential responses to key design features. Instructional Science, 40(2012), 93–118. doi:10.1007/s11251-010-9163-0


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Cypress 1 Room

3:45pm PDT

CON08.07 - Transforming the first year writing experience: Blended learning in the composition classroom
Writing instruction which aids undergraduate researchers in effectively articulating their ideas is intellectually transformative and vital to the ongoing health of scholarly communities. Yet many current composition classrooms experience challenging conditions due to size (which reduces opportunities for hands-on learning and prompt, individualized feedback). Canadian composition classes average between 30 and 40 students, well exceeding the long-standing Association of Departments of English (ADE) policy statement, which advocates composition class sizes of no more than twenty students (ADE/ MLA, 1992). At a first year level, these classes also rarely have the opportunity to address disciplinary differences in writing and so students do not perceive themselves as entering a research community when they choose their area of study. While online composition courses can offer more opportunities for writing, the isolation and lack of peer interaction can decrease students’ motivation and be antithetical to the notion of entering a scholarly community (Boyd, 2008). This presentation reports on a pilot blended learning approach for first year writing classes which sought to address these size, feedback, and disciplinary issues. The approach incorporated online instructional videos and content slides, as well as online writing assignments, which meant that students physically attended approximately half the class meetings and worked independently for the remainder. Such strategies sought to increase timely individualized feedback opportunities and offer more as-needed, disciplinary-based content, while still creating a learning community and adding to the sparse research on blended learning in Canadian composition classrooms. Findings from comparative analysis of control and pilot group surveys suggest that the blended approach’s increased opportunities for online writing and additional feedback aided student learning. Online content, however, appeared less helpful. These findings will be contextualized in relation to existing studies on blended learning in U.S. composition classrooms (eg. Gouge, 2009; Middlebrook, 2013), and the presentation will conclude with participant discussion of additional blended writing strategies. 

References: 
Association of Departments of English. (1992). ADE Guidelines for Class Size and Workload for College and University Teachers of English: A Statement of Policy. Retrieved from http://www.ade.org/policy/policy_guidelines.htm 

Boyd, P.W. (2008). Analyzing students’ perceptions of their learning in online and hybrid first-year composition courses. Computers and Composition, 25, 224–243.

Gouge, C. (2009). Conversation at a crucial moment: Hybrid courses and the future of writing programs. College English 71(4), 338-362. 

Middlebrook, R. H. (2013). Degree of hybridity: Peer review in the blended composition classroom. Journal of Educational Technology, 10(1), 1-9.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Chairman Room

3:45pm PDT

CON08.08 - Achieving harmony in eLearning development: A collaborative discussion
The purpose of this session is to build upon The Transformation to eLearning: A Collaborative Discussion about Lessons Learned session from STLHE 2014. The outcome of that session was to determine common successes and challenges faced by participants during their experiences transforming higher education curriculum to an eLearning format. While the Canadian Council on Learning (2009) defines eLearning as “the application of computer technologies to education” (p. 4), we situate that within the context of the development and delivery of hybrid, blended, and fully-online curriculum. This year, we intend to build upon our 2014 session by addressing the identified, disparate successes – positive student and faculty feedback, and increased institutional collaboration – and challenges – negative faculty and administrative feedback, lack of resource allocation, challenges with intellectual property and privacy, and effectiveness of implementation – experienced during the development of eLearning curriculum. During the session, participants will discuss strategies employed and/or formulate new ideas to address dissonance between student, faculty, and administrative satisfaction with and support for eLearning processes and products and collaborate with participants from across Canadian higher education institutions regarding successes and challenges experienced with their institutions’ eLearning efforts. Attendance at our 2014 session is not necessary to participating in this collaborative discussion! This session is relevant to faculty, educational developers and administrators seeking to refine existing practices or implement best practices (Boettcher & Conrad, 2010) for achieving harmony with all stakeholders in the development of effective eLearning (Clark & Mayer, 2011) and in doing so, furthering the field of eLearning development.

References:

• Boettcher, J. V., & Conrad, R. M. (2010). The Online Teaching Survival Guide: Simple and Practical Pedagogical Tips. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
• Canadian Council on Learning. (2009). State of E-learning in Canada. Retrieved from http://www.ccl-cca.ca/pdfs/E-learning/E-Learning_Report_FINAL-E.PDF
• Clark, R. C., & Mayer, R. E. (2011). E-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning (3rd Edition). Hoboken, NJ: Pfeiffer.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Taylor (Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College)

Rebecca Taylor (Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College)

Coordinator, Technology-Enabled Learning, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College



Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Director Room

3:45pm PDT

CON08.04 - Exploring the outcomes of empowerment among health sciences students
The concept of empowerment has been a topic of interest in the educational literature for decades. The link between structural and psychological empowerment is well established among employees (Spreitzer, 1995); however, this relationship has not been adequately explored in the student context. In addition, although the direct association between structural empowerment and positive student attitudes, behaviours, and academic success has recently been noted (Babenko-Mould et al., 2012; Houser & Bainbridge Frymier, 2009; Beauvais et al., 2013), this research fails to identify the mediating mechanisms through which structural empowerment impacts student outcomes. The purpose of this study was to test a multi-group mediated model of empowerment within nine programs at a large urban Canadian college. Relationships between student empowerment (structural and psychological), engagement, satisfaction, collaboration, and intent to stay (current program of study and academic institution) were tested using a cross-sectional survey design. A convenience quota sampling plan was employed in an attempt to achieve adequate representation from each program. Data analysis was completed using multi- group structural equation modeling. Knowledge gained from this study may be useful in creating learning environments which facilitate students’ access to resources, opportunity, information, and power (structural empowerment). In turn, these structurally empowering academic environments are likely to increase student’s psychological empowerment (meaning, confidence, self-determination, and impact), collaboration, academic engagement, and intent to stay.

Babenko-Mould, Y., Iwasix, C., Andrusyszyn, M.A., Laschinger, H., & Weston, W. (2012). Effects of clinical practice environments on clinical teacher and nursing student outcomes. Journal of Nursing Education, 51(4), 217-226.

Beauvais, A.M., Stewart, J.G., DeNisco, S., & Beauvais, J.E. (2013). Factors related to academic success among nursing students: A descriptive correlational research study. Nursing Education Today, 1-6.

Houser, M.L., & Bainbridge Frymier, A. (2009). The role of student characteristics and teacher behaviours in students’ learner empowerment. Communication Education, 58(1), 35-53.

Spreitzer, G.M. (1995). Psychological empowerment in the workplace: dimension, measurement, and validation. Academy of Management Journal, 38(5), 1442-1465.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Mackenzie Room

3:45pm PDT

CON08.05 - Examining the role of friendship in mentoring relationships between faculty advisors and graduate students
There is considerable disagreement among authors regarding the critical functions employed by faculty advisors in the effective mentoring of graduate students. Some of this ambiguity relates to the dubious role of ‘friendship’ in these mentoring relationships. Kram’s (1988) seminal research, which was conducted in a business setting, but has been widely (and perhaps blindly) adopted within academia, identified friendship as being an important psychosocial function of mentoring. However, Johnson (2008), among others, has questioned the possible incompatibility of faculty mentors serving as friends while maintaining their roles as objective evaluators of their students’ work. In a recent study examining mentoring between faculty advisors and graduate students, Beres and Dixon (2014) found elements of mutual respect and collegiality, which may be precursors to friendship. For example, these authors found that mentors treated protégés like equals, downplaying the power and status differences between them. Despite these insights, and given the retrospective nature of their study, it remains unclear whether friendship was present at the start of the mentoring relationships, whether it developed during the students’ journey through graduate school, whether it developed after the active mentoring relationships had ended, or if it developed at all. Following a discussion of the existing literature regarding the tenuous role of friendship within mentoring relationships between faculty advisors and graduate students, we will engage participants in individual and group activities that will foster a deeper exploration of this topic, while helping participants (re-)consider the possible role of friendship in their past, present, and future mentoring relationships.

Beres, J. L., & Dixon, J. C. (2014). Exploring mentoring functions within the sport management academy: Perspectives of mentors and protégés. Sport Management Education Journal, 8, 14-26. doi:10.1123/SMEJ.2012-0007

Johnson, W. B. (2008). Are advocacy, mutuality, and evaluation incompatible mentoring functions? Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning, 16, 31–44. doi:10.1080/13611260701800942

Kram, K. E. (1988). Mentoring at work: Developmental relationships in organizational life. Boston, MA: University Press of America.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Seymour Room

3:45pm PDT

CON08.06 - Formation et pédagogie universitaire
Les compétences pédagogiques des formateurs universitaires jouent un rôle significatif dans la qualité de l’enseignement et de l’encadrement offerts aux étudiantes et aux étudiants. De nombreux chercheurs et intervenants des centres de développement pédagogique soulignent, par ailleurs, l’importance de mettre en place des formations pour les enseignants universitaires (Leduc, 2012; Luzeckyj et Badger, 2008). Dans cette optique, le centre de formation de soutien à l’académique offre depuis février 2014 des formations à la carte aux professeurs, maîtres de langue et personnes chargées de cours, leur permettant d’affiner leurs pratiques pédagogiques. En soutenant le développement professionnel des formateurs, le centre de formation contribue ainsi à instaurer une culture de formation continue ainsi qu’une dynamique de changement favorisant l’innovation pédagogique (Savoie-Zajc, 2010) dans l’institution, et ce, en favorisant les échanges et l’accompagnement. La communication vise, dans un premier temps, à faire le portrait des différentes formations offertes en pédagogie universitaire puis à analyser leur impact sur les pratiques pédagogiques, du point de vue des participants « formés ». Nous tenterons de démontrer que les formations répondent à des conditions qui permettent aux formateurs universitaires de reconnaître les besoins de leurs étudiants, d’acquérir et de parfaire des connaissances et des compétences en matière d’enseignement et d’apprentissage ainsi que d’être reconnus et valorisés pour leur travail (Frenay, Saroyan, Taylor, Bédard, Clement, Rege Colet, Paulet et Kolmos, 2010).

Frenay, M., Saroyan, A., Taylor, L., Bédard, D., Clement, M., Rege Colet, N., Paul, J-J. et Kolmos, A. (2010). Accompagner le développement pédagogique des professeurs universitaires à l'aide d'un cadre conceptuel original. Revue française de pédagogie, 3(172), 63-76.

Leduc, D. (2007). Conceptions, pratiques et besoins à l’enseignement universitaire : une comparaison entre professeurs novices et experts.Communication présentée au 24e congrès de l’AIPU (Association internationale de pédagogie universitaire). Montréal, Québec.

Luzeckyj, A. et Badger, L. (2008). Literature review for preparing academics to teach in higher education (PATHE). Australian Learning & Teaching Council (ALTC).

Savoie-Zajc, L. (2010). Les dynamiques d’accompagnement dans la mise en place de communautés d’apprentissage. Éducation et formation, e-293, 9-20.

Speakers
avatar for Helene Meunier

Helene Meunier

Conseillère pédagogique, UQAM
Chargée de cours au département d’éducation et pédagogie ainsi qu’au département de didactique à l’Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Hélène Meunier est aussi conseillère pédagogique à l’UQAM depuis février 2014 et termine un doctorat en évaluation des... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Thompson Room

3:45pm PDT

CON08.13 - Tuning into students: Social impact of institutional rankings
Maclean's magazine, in November 2014, published its 23rd annual rankings of Canadian universities. Indeed, the ranking of universities has become a popular exercise with which to assess and promote higher education in North America. The ranking approach is similar to that used by publications such as Consumer Reports, in which goods or services are assigned scores, and then assigned relative rank standings. We present a data-based perspective on a multi-year analysis of Maclean's rankings of Canadian universities, including Spearman rank correlations, Wilcoxon rank sums, and a cluster analysis. More importantly, we discuss the relative social impact of these rankings on student welfare as they attend (and later exit from) university. Session attendees are invited to share the perspective from their own institution.

Cramer, K. M., & Page, S. (2007). Calibrating Canadian universities: Rankings for sale once again. Canadian Journal of School Psychology, 22, 4-13.

Page, S., Cramer, K. M., & Page, L. (2010). Canadian university rankings: Buyer beware once again. Interchange, 41, 81-89.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Cypress 2 Room

4:30pm PDT

CON09.05 - Understanding the role of undergraduate research mentorship in influencing student identity development
There is considerable literature on mentoring relationships in higher education, on undergraduate research (UGR) experiences and the identity development of university students across the spectrum of academic, professional and personal identities (Wuetherick and McLaughlin, 2011; Laursen et al., 2010; Luyckx et al, 2010; Ralph and Walker, 2010; and Trede, Macklin and Bridges, 2010). There is, however, little previous work that brings these three diverse literatures together. This presentation sets out to examine how mentoring relationships in undergraduate research experiences influence student identity formation in personal and professional communities. This multi-institutional and multidisciplinary effort introduces work in progress developed at Elon University’s Center for Engaged Learning Seminar on Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research. While this work aims to explore how students negotiate shifting identities across personal and professional communities, its preliminary exploration will be on the most important values of mentoring relationships in UGR, and on the mentoring practices that shape students’ identity development. We propose that students’ ability to understand themselves as researchers is largely shaped by the ways in which they navigate/negotiate between personal and professional identities. We would also suggest that mentors might not be aware of the challenges that some students—particularly from under-represented populations—face in negotiating personal and professional identities. Therefore, an outcome for our research is to develop resources for faculty preparing to work with undergraduate researchers.

References:

Laursen S, Hunter A, Seymour E, Thiry H, and Melton G (2010). Undergraduate Research in the Sciences: Engaging Students in Real Science. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Luyckx K., Schwartz S. , Goossens L., Beyers J. Missotten L. (2010) Processes of personal identity formation and evaluation, In: Handbook of Identity Theory and Research (Vols 1 and 2). Schwartz, Seth J. (Ed); Luyckx, Koen (Ed); Vignoles, Vivian L. (Eds); New York, NY, US: Springer, 77-98.

Ralph E., and Walker K. (2010). Rising with the tide: Applying “Adaptive Mentorship” in the professional practicum. Collected Essays on Learning and Teaching, 3.

Trede F., Macklin R., and Bridges D. (2012) Professional identity development: a review of the higher education literature. Studies in Higher Education. 37 (3), 365–384.

Wuetherick, B. and McLaughlin, L.(2011). Students’ Perceptions of the Learning Environment: A Partnership to Enhance Our Understanding of the Undergraduate Experience. In Little S. (ed.). Staff-Student Partnerships in Higher Education. London: Continuum International Publishing Group.

Speakers
avatar for Brad Wuetherick

Brad Wuetherick

Executive Director, Learning and Teaching, Dalhousie University
Brad Wuetherick is the Executive Director, Learning and Teaching at Dalhousie University, and is an active researcher in teaching and learning in higher education in areas including undergraduate research, educational development, SOTL, facilitating change in teaching and learning... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Seymour Room

4:30pm PDT

CON09.12 - Going the distance to promote excellence in teaching: Tracking the effectiveness of a reciprocal peer observation approach in higher education
In this session, participants will learn about the development of a peer observation of teaching initiative at the University of Windsor. In addition, attendees will also find out about a novel mapping software that provides an opportunity to “see” the impact of teaching and learning initiatives instituted on university campuses. Peer observation of teaching has been shown to helps educators develop new skills (Chester, 2012), learn about personal strengths and weakness (Koc, 2011), and affirm self-efficacy (Hendry & Oliver, 2012). Our peer collaboration network was designed to stimulate professional and pedagogical growth, enable instructors to give and receive feedback and share experiences and ideas with colleagues to improve teaching and learning. The effectiveness of the network will be discussed in two ways. First, qualitative feedback from network participants will be presented as it relates to several consistently reported themes. Secondly, network expansion and development will be highlighted using scaled visual maps which depict the extent of the collaboration among peer observers and observees, academic units, and faculties within the network. Through the novel application of mapping software, network expansion and development can be monitored and quantified in terms of the number of connections made between participants, as well as between and within units on campus. The application of this mapping approach to other educational development initiatives will be discussed.

Chester, A. (2012). Peer partnerships in teaching: Evaluation of a voluntary model of professional development in tertiary education. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 12(2), 94-108.

Hendry, G. D., & Oliver, G. R. (2012). Seeing is believing: The benefits of peer observation. Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, 9(1), 11

Koc, C. (2011). The views of prospective class teachers about peer assessment in teaching practice. Educational Sciences: Theory and Practice, 11(4), 1979-1989.

Speakers
avatar for Judy AK Bornais

Judy AK Bornais

Experiential Learning Specialist, Teaching Leadership Chair, University of Windsor
Judy Bornais is currently an Experiential Learning Specialist with the Faculty of Nursing. She feels that teaching has been at the core of her work as a practitioner and academic. Teaching nursing students appealed to Judy as an opportunity to make a broader contribution to health... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Cypress 1 Room

4:30pm PDT

CON09.08 - Seeing is doing: Modeling academic writing and research through instructional videos to support our English Language Learners (ELLs)
As universities in Canada admit unprecedented numbers of English Language Learners, teaching strategies must adapt. These often gifted students work hard to compensate for their still imperfect academic literacy skills, and universities want to support them without putting extra burden on busy instructors. One method to achieve harmony and promote academic writing in lower division courses is through implementing instructional videos. Koumi (2006) states that videos have the ability to model a process, offer a visual metaphor and provide vicarious experiences which motivate students. Many university courses focus on product rather than process which is a disadvantage to ELLs (Hinkel, 2004). Videos offer a combination of the visual plus audio which supports novice learners (Kalyuga, 2000). By posting videos on public sites such as YouTube, they are available 24/7 for multiple viewings. The value of designing instructional videos through narrative will be explored. When students identify with characters portrayed in a familiar story of arrival at university, they feel less stigma at needing extra help. They see people like themselves talking to friendly librarians, learning to do search steps and revising texts. This allows them to reflect on a more holistic vision of themselves and cast themselves in new identities (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000). Segments of two videos that the author has created will be shown for discussion, and participants will better understand the nature of teaching and supporting ELLs in higher education. This interactive presentation will appeal to academic instructors, administrators and advisors. Video links will be shared.

Clandinin, D. J. & Connelly, F.M. (2000). Narrative inquiry: Experience and story in qualitative research. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Hinkel, E. (2004). Teaching academic ESL writing: Practical techniques in vocabulary and grammar. Mahwah, NJ: L. Erlbaum Associates

Kalyuga, S. (2000). When using sound with a text or picture is not beneficial for learning. Australian Journal of Educational Technology, 16 (2): 161–72.

Koumi, J. (2006). Designing video and multimedia for open and flexible learning. NY: Routledge.


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Director Room

4:30pm PDT

CON09.09 - E-learning, e-quality
Humber College ITAL has undertaken a systematic approach to the development and renewal of online courses, as part of an institutional goal to ensure excellence in quality of all e-learning environments. As part of this initiative, Humber’s Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL) conducted both an extensive faculty engagement and consultation process and a survey of students as a means to inform the development of Humber’s e-Learning Strategy. Data was collected from over 1200 student surveys and round table discussions with more than 50 faculty. While quality was the most prevalent theme that emerged from both participant groups, analysis of responses across groups suggests different understandings of the purposes, processes and outcomes of online learning and how these relate to measures of quality e-learning experiences. As well, variation was evident between faculty understandings and existing research on quality e-Learning. By sharing results from both studies, this presentation aims to surface assumptions and identify the tensions between student and faculty perceptions on e-learning. Examples of how these tensions are reflected in learning environments, including the actual development and delivery of online courses, will be highlighted and session participants will be invited to contribute examples from their own institutions. Additionally, as part of Humber’s commitment to quality e-learning, the CTL and the Department of Program Planning Development and Renewal have created tools and processes to support faculty development specific to deepening understanding and skills related to online teaching and learning. Again, participants will be encouraged to draw on their experiences online teaching and learning and share existing and emerging professional development practices that support faculty to offer quality e-learning experiences. Discussions will enable the querying of current practices and the identification of future opportunities.

Amundsen, C. & Wilson, M. (2012). Are we asking the right questions? A conceptual review of the educational development literature in higher education. Review of Educational Research, 82(1), 90–126.

Balacheff, N., Ludvigsen, S., de Jong , T., Lazonder, A. & Barnes, S. (2009). Technology-Enhanced Learning: Principles and Products. Springer.

Cox, B. E., McIntosh, K. L., Reason, R. D., & Terenzini, P. T. (2011). A culture of teaching: Policy, perception, and practice in higher education. Research in Higher Education, 52(8), 808-829.

Yee, K., & Hargis, J. (2012). Indirect Faculty Development and the Role of Sociability. Journal on Centers for Teaching & Learning, 4, 61-78.


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Salon 1

4:30pm PDT

CON09.03 - Use of reflection to improve student metacognition about their learning
Flexible learning strategies provide logistical and pedagogical flexibility to students and faculty. Reflective practice is one strategy for promoting personal and professional growth. This presentation will discuss applications for reflective practice: how to guide deeper learning, and how to evaluate the depth of student learning. One reflective practice research project will be described in detail. Seventy senior nursing students collaborated on practice-based projects with healthcare leaders from different sectors (e.g.., acute care, community, mental health). These projects enabled students to appreciate the extensive roles and accountabilities of nurse leaders. Student project work was totally conducted outside a class setting: students used a number of online tools to coordinate their work, and to produce agreed-upon project deliverables within a three-month period of time. Specific project learning objectives included students’ synthesis of knowledge from critical inquiry/research; relational practice/communications; leadership, ethics and policy; and professional practice. Structured reflective practice papers were intended to: a) deepen students’ appreciation of knowledge synthesis/application through project work (Mezirow, 2006); and b) stimulate identity development with respect to the richness of nurse leader roles within health care (Moje, 2008). Guided reflective practice questions and a reflective practice rubric were given to students before their assignment, and the rubric was used by faculty to assess the depth of student learning related to project work. The probing questions and rubric are based on Ryan (2012). Results from reflective paper analysis will be reviewed, particularly the “ah ha” new learning moments from this one flexible learning activity. 

References:

McGuire, L., Lay, J., & Peters, J. (2009). Pedagogy of reflective writing in professional education. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 9, 93-107. 

Moje, E. (2008). Foregrounding the disciplines in secondary literacy teaching and learning: a call for change. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 52(2), 96-107.

Ryan, M. (2012). Conceptualising and teaching discursives and performative reflection in higher education. Studies in Continuing Education, 34(2), 207-223.


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Bayshore Salon EF

4:30pm PDT

CON09.02 - Making sense of student rating of instruction data: Effective visualization techniques to inform teaching practice
Student Rating of Instruction (SRI) surveys produce useful information about some facets of teaching practice, but use of SRI data - and faith that they are useful - varies widely among institutions. Part of the reason often lies in the way the information is reported to its potential users. How might new approaches for presenting and investigating SRI data enable us to uncover and tell our teaching narratives more accurately and effectively, and point us in new directions for inquiry and growth? Participants in this session explore new and relatively simple techniques for visualizing aggregated and longitudinal SRI data to identify, reflect on, and document patterns found within the data. Reporting on a project focused on enhancing and promoting effective use of SRI data, we demonstrate some accessible, spreadsheet-based prototype tools that visualize SRI data in a variety of ways, provide context over time or within a program or teaching unit, and guide the reader's interpretation of the results. Using specific cases, participants and presenters together explore effective ways that such tools can be used by instructors, department heads, and academic developers to find meaningful patterns in SRI data, to annotate and document facets of an instructor's teaching in a portfolio, or to find insights that can lead to improved teaching practice for an individual instructor or within a program. We also provide some cautions about ways that SRI cannot or should not be used, and show how visualization tools can help avoid such misuse.

Graniero, P.A., Hamilton, B. and Cramer, K. (2014). SRI data aggregation and visualization: An evaluation of potential uses. Technical Report commissioned for Wright, A., Mighty, J., Muirhead, W., Scott, J., & Hamilton, B. (2014). The Ontario Universities' Teaching Evaluation Toolkit Feasibility Study: A Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities Productivity and Innovation Fund Initiative. University of Windsor: Windsor, ON.

Hativa, N. (2013a). Student ratings of instruction: Recognizing effective teaching. Charleston, SC: CreateSpace.

Hativa, N. (2013b). Student ratings of instruction: A practical approach to designing, operating, and reporting. Charleston, SC: CreateSpace.

Winer, L., di Genova, L., Vungoc, P.-A. & Talsma, S. (2012). Interpreting end-of-course evaluation results. Montreal: Teaching and Learning Services, McGill University.



Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Bayshore Salon D

4:30pm PDT

CON09.04 - Student conceptions of “learning” as evidenced through short response items in learning journals
The purpose of this session is to fine tune our understandings around validity as it applies to formative assessment by exploring some of the educational implications derived from a study of student understanding or beliefs about what it means “to learn” (Chiou, Liang & Tsai, 2012). Participants will consider evidence presented in the form of Learning Journal short item responses from an undergraduate biology course in order to evaluate the relationship between what students claim to have learned and the evidence they provide to support those claims. Learning Journals are widely used as formative assessment to encourage students to reflect on their learning (Stephens & Winterbottom, 2010) and offer the potential to capture perspectives that are relatively immediate, since they are written close in time to the events being recorded (Wagner, 1999). In prior research on student conceptions of learning, participant responses from interviews or questionnaires are coded as being unproblematic representations of what students think. This may make sense for investigating learning in the traditional sense of transmission, but many university courses incorporate interactive and flexible learning strategies, requiring a negotiation of meaning between professors and their students. Therefore, we address issues of validity in formative assessment with a novel application of Discursive Psychology (Edwards, 1997) to written text, in order to explore the students’ contributions to the co-construction of what it means “to learn”. The presenters will invite discussion around how recognizing what students use as evidence for their own learning can help us better support learning.

Chiou, G.-L., Liang, J.-C. & Tsai, C.-C. (2012). Undergraduate students’ conceptions of and approaches to learning in biology: A study of their structural models and gender differences. International Journal of Science Education, 34, 167-195. doi:10.1080/09500693.2011.558131

Edwards, D. (1997). Discourse and cognition. London: Sage.

Stephens, K. & Winterbottom, M. (2010). Using a learning log to support students’ learning in biology lessons. Journal of Biological Education, 44, 72-80. doi:10.1080/00219266.2010.9656197

Wagner, Z. (1999). Using student journals for course evaluation. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 24(3), 261-272. doi:10.1080/0260293990240301


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Mackenzie Room

4:30pm PDT

CON09.07 - Assessing the quality of online education
The rapid growth of online education (Allen & Seaman, 2013) brings questions about how best to maintain quality in teaching and ensure effective learning. One way to assess quality is through reliability and validity measures of student scores (Norman & Eva, 2010). We assessed the reliability and validity of a component of a new, online Masters of Sciences in Health Sciences Education Program for recent graduates and health professionals. The first required online course for students, entitled ‘Learning & Curriculum,’ exposes students to the basic principles of human memory and learning and challenges them to incorporate these principles into their own learning. Specifically, students are assessed in part on their participation in discussion posts to carefully designed ‘points to ponder’. An assessment of student scores showed an acceptable level of variance, with the greatest source from students (0.73). Inter-rater agreement was also high at 0.73 across all topics of discussion. Students also benefitted from the involvement and feedback of instructors as student scores showed an increasing trend over time. These scores also correlated positively with measures of performance from other components of the course (0.3). The purpose of our presentation will be to first share information about the planning of this nascent program and our application of successful teaching and learning strategies (Dunlosky et al, 2013) to an online format. Importantly, we will discuss our analyses and the interpretation of those results. We hope to engage participants in discussions of measuring impact in education and how best to interpret data. 

Allen, I. E., & Seaman, J. (2013). Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States. Sloan Consortium. PO Box 1238, Newburyport, MA 01950. 

Norman, G. R., & Eva, K. W. (2010). Diagnostic error and clinical reasoning. Medical education, 44(1), 94-100. 

Mayer, R. E. (2003). The promise of multimedia learning: using the same instructional design methods across different media. Learning and instruction, 13(2), 125-139.

Dunlosky, J., Rawson, K. A., Marsh, E. J., Nathan, M. J., & Willingham, D. T. (2013). Improving students’ learning with effective learning techniques promising directions from cognitive and educational psychology. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 14(1), 4-58.


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Chairman Room

4:30pm PDT

CON09.10 - Flipped classroom: Results from a two-year implementation of four large undergraduate calculus courses
Our study reports the survey results of students’ flipped classroom experiences (n=411) across four first-year undergraduate calculus courses over a period of two-years. Our flipped classroom model combines the use of before-class instructor-made video lectures which are followed by online quizzes, in-class use of i>Clicker classroom response systems, peer-instruction, and just-in-time teaching. Analysis of student questionnaire data shows that students across all four offerings perceived the video lectures as valuable, and their overall flipped classroom experiences as positive. Factor analysis of the survey items revealed four consistent factors across course offerings (including different sections and instructors). They are 1) satisfaction with videos (perception of usefulness/value of the videos), 2) engagement with flipped classroom videos (watching videos and taking notes before coming to the flipped in-person classes), 3) reviewing behaviours (primarily of videos after class and during exam periods), and 4) engagement with peers. Analysis of these factors found several relationships. Among these were that engagement with flipped classroom videos positively correlates with grades, while reviewing behaviours of videos after flipped classes and before exams were negatively associated with grades. We will present these, as well as other study results. We will also share our instructional practice, and engage attendees in a discussion of how our experience and research findings informed our practice, and how attendees can apply these findings and active learning strategies in their own settings.


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Salon 2

4:30pm PDT

CON09.13 - Harness the power of test-enhanced learning using mTuner
mTuner is an online assessment application developed by our lab. It’s designed based on the research findings on test-enhanced learning (Roediger & Karpicke, 2006; Roediger & Marsh, 2005). mTuner test is a multiple-choice test with extra features. For each mTuner item, students are first primed with only the question and are given a chance to recall the answer. Once students enter their answer, they are showed the alternatives and are asked to make their response. If they choose the right alternative, the answer is highlighted and an explanation shows up elaborating why that answer is the correct one. However, if students choose the wrong alternative, they are directed either to a relevant passage from the eBook or to a brief video clip of a relevant lecture. In either case, the material they are exposed to provides them the information they need to figure out the right answer. After reviewing the material, students are given a second chance to choose again for partial credit. This time, regardless of whether students choose the correct alternative, they are showed the correct answer along with the explanation. This ensures students know the correct answer and why it is correct before they move on to the next item and, as such, they leave the assessment with a more accurate knowledge base than they had going in. In our presentation we will show a demo of mTuner and describe how it was implemented in an Introductory Psychology course, and we will also present empirical research data supporting the effectiveness of the application.


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Cypress 2 Room
 
Friday, June 19
 

10:45am PDT

CON12.01 - Flexible classroom trends in Biology: Promoting active learning with appropriate supportive scaffolding – the BioFlex approach
As part of the Flexible Learning Initiative (FLI) at the [University of British Columbia], two of the first-year Biology courses were transformed to a semi-flipped classroom format. The goal of the FLI is to promote deeper conceptual understanding in Biology, along with an emphasis on relevant and rewarding learning experiences in the classroom (Bergmann & Sams, 2014, Freeman, S., et al., 2011, Hamdan, N., et al., 2013, Strayer, 2012) . A variety of content delivery methods were introduced to make the flipped classroom approach feasible and sustainable (Taylor, J., et al., 2010). A major part of the in-class time is devoted to group work, problem solving and discussions that are supported with timely and appropriate scaffolding. The in-class activities were designed to include mini lectures, group activity, intermittent follow-ups for the group activity, and at the end a final check-in to summarize and conclude the activity, as a way to help students make meaning of the activity and learn from the experience. The success of our approach in the first year courses was systematically assessed using validated concept questions as pre- and post-tests. Pre- and post-surveys on student involvement, motivation, and engagement were also used to document student perceptions of the approaches being implemented. Lessons learned from the transformation of the two large enrolments, multi-section, 1st year biology courses, are informing similar transformation of 2nd year and other upper-level courses in Biology. Data from the assessments of the project, our triumphs, and our challenges will be shared in the presentation.

References:

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2014). Flipped learning: Maximizing face time. Training & Development, 68(2), 28-31. https://www.td.org/Publications/Magazines/TD/TD-Archive/2014/02/Flipped-Learning-Maximizing-Face-Time 

Freeman, S. Haak, D, Wenderoth, M. P. (2011). Increased Course Structure Improves Performance in Introductory Biology. CBE Life Sci Educ. 2011 Summer; 10(2): 175–186. doi: 10.1187/cbe.10-08-0105

Hamdan, N., McKnight, P., McKnight, K., & Arfstrom, K. (2013). A review of flipped learning. Retrieved from http://www.flippedlearning.org/cms/lib07/VA01923112/Centricity/Domain/41/LitReview_FlippedLearning.pdf

Strayer, J. F. (2012) How learning in an inverted classroom influences cooperation, innovation and task orientation. Learning Environments Research 07/2012; 15(2):171-193. doi: 10.1007/s10984-012-9108-4

Taylor. J. L., Smith, K. M., van Stolk, A. P., Spiegelman, G. B. (2010). Using invention to change how students tackle problems. CBE Life Science Education 2010 9: 504-512. doi:10.1187/cbe.10-02-0012


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Bayshore Salon D

10:45am PDT

CON12.12 - Threshold process for understanding and applying systems principles
This session will describe the theoretical framework of threshold concepts and explore its relevance to the relationship between epistemic and ontological cognitive development (EOCD) and applying systems principles to complex problems. Threshold concepts are defined as concepts that are essential for the mastery of a particular disciplinary framework (Meyer & Land, 2005). Further, they are key concepts that need to be understood before a student can develop beyond the stage of novice. 

Studies of personal epistemology focus on “how the individual develops conceptions of knowledge and knowing and utilizes them in developing understanding of the world” (Hofer & Pintrich, 2002, p. 4). These studies are interested in “beliefs about the definition of knowledge, how knowledge is constructed, how knowledge is evaluated, where knowledge resides, and how knowing occurs” (ibid). Systems thinking, based on the principles of holism and pluralism, is necessary for dealing with issues of complexity and uncertainty (Bawden, 2007). Both holism and pluralism require complex ontological beliefs and epistemic cognitive skills (Bawden, 2007).

By integrating Reflective Judgment Model (King & Kitchener, 1994) and Model of Epistemic and Ontological Cognitive Development (Greene, Torney-Purta, & Azevedo, 2010), I position EOCD as having the characteristics of a threshold concept for systems thinking; however, I argue further that the term threshold process is a more accurate descriptor for EOCD in relation to systems thinking. I will present pedagogical activities for promoting EOCD and developing systems thinking competencies. You will have the opportunity to discuss your own practices relative to teaching about systems.

Key words: Epistemic and ontological cognitive development, threshold concepts, systems thinking
References:

Bawden, R. (2007). Pedagogies for persistence: cognitive challenges and collective competency development. International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable Development, 2(3), 299–314.

Greene, J. A., Torney-Purta, J., & Azevedo, R. (2010). Empirical evidence regarding relations among a model of epistemic and ontological cognition, academic performance, and educational level. Journal of Educational Psychology, 102(1), 2

Hofer, B. K., & Pintrich, P. R. (Eds.). (2002). Personal epistemology: the psychology of beliefs about knowledge and knowing. Erlbaum Associates, Mahwah, N.J: L.

King, P. M., & Kitchener, K. S. (1994). Developing Reflective Judgment. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.

Meyer, J. H. F., & Land, R. (2005). Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge (2): Epistemological considerations and a conceptual framework for teaching and learning. Higher Education, 49(3), 373–388.


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Cypress 2 Room

10:45am PDT

CON12.08 - Development and implementation of a campus-wide survey of faculty teaching practices and perceptions
During the 2014-2015 academic year, the University of British Columbia (University of British Columbia), ran a large, campus-wide survey to measure the impact of initiatives intended to influence teaching practices, provide data to inform strategic planning, and to inform a larger research project exploring factors that influence faculty to change teaching practices. In the first section of the survey, faculty provided details about teaching practices in their largest enrolment course. In the second section, faculty responded to both closed and open-ended questions about their attitudes toward specific teaching practices and their perceptions of the teaching climate at University of British Columbia. Over 1100 faculty with teaching responsibilities across 11 Faculties responded to the survey. This session is intended for those who may be interested in running a similar survey. In this session we will share the survey and discuss it’s evolution from an instrument developed in 2008 as part of a campus-wide initiative to modifications by various institutions in the Bay View Alliance as well as the Association of American Universities. We will also discuss how the survey was tested and how we achieved campus-wide buy-in which, despite no financial incentives, we believe resulted in a high number of responses. We will share high-level survey data, highlighting questions that were particularly useful and discussing areas where further modifications could improve internal validity. Finally, we’ll discuss how the results have been disseminated and share plans for future analysis.

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How learning works: Seven research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Kuh, G. D., Schneider, C. G., & Association of American Colleges and Universities. (2008). High-impact educational practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Sens, A., & Fryer, M. (2012). Enriched Educational Experiences at University of British Columbia: A Framework for Dialogue and Action. Retrieved from http://vpstudents.University of British Columbia.ca/files/2012/07/E3_framework_report_2012_final.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Han (University of British Columbia)

Andrea Han (University of British Columbia)

Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology - Senior Manager, Curriculum and Special Projects, University of British Columbia
avatar for Simon Bates (University of British Columbia)

Simon Bates (University of British Columbia)

Senior Advisor, Teaching and Learning | Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology., University of British Columbia
STLHE conference co-chair | Professor of Teaching in Physics and Astronomy at UBC, currently designing a new intro course for first year Physics students.


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Salon 1

10:45am PDT

CON12.03 - Online course design to facilitate transition from MOOC to fully-registered university student
We are currently running a totally online version of Introduction to Psychology I and II (PSYC1001, PSYC1002). The courses have tuition fees and normal admission standards and credit is granted for successful completion. The courses start and end like a typical semester but lectures and exams are conducted whenever the student desires. It is available to students globally who meet our university’s admission standards. We also run a non-credit (MOOC) version of the courses. The MOOC has no tuition fees nor admission standards or formal exams but is otherwise identical to the first courses. It enables people to “taste-test” PSYC1001 or PSYC1002 who are otherwise uncertain of their university readiness, or who may have insufficient time or money. Students may register in the MOOC at any time and proceed entirely at their own pace. A third version of PSYC1001 and PSYC1002 serves as a bridge from the MOOC to the for-credit version. If a student finds the material interesting or accessible to them, Flex Term allows them to capitalize on their learning and become a tuition-paying, for-credit student. Flex Term allows students to avoid the restrictions of due dates and deadlines associated with the typical semester structure. We will summarize the development of these courses, initial reactions and feedback, and discuss implications of this model. Participants will leave with first-hand experience of these courses and an understanding of the challenges and successes that flow from the intention to facilitate student transition from a MOOC to a tuition-bearing, for-credit university course.

Atenas, J. (2015). Model for democratization of the contents hosted in MOOCs. RUSC Universities and Knowledge Society Journal, 12(1). 3-14. Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v12i1.2031

Noll, J. (2015). Taking psychology online with quality, rigor, and engagement. Presentation at the National Institute for the Teaching of Psychology. St. Petersburg, FL.

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Lyons

Patrick Lyons

Director, Teaching and Learning, Carleton University
Patrick Lyons is the Director, Teaching and Learning in the Office of the Associate Vice-President Teaching and Learning at Carleton University. He is responsible for the leadership and direction for Carleton’s initiatives in blended and online learning, educational development... Read More →
avatar for Bruce H. Tsuji (Carleton University)

Bruce H. Tsuji (Carleton University)

Carleton University
Teaching psychology online, human-computer interaction


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Mackenzie Room

10:45am PDT

CON12.07 - Flip this classroom: Changing post-secondary teaching environments
Are we looking at the end of the lecture or does it still have a role in post-secondary education? Are SCALE-UP classrooms and the flipped pedagogy the panacea to reform modern educational institutions? This interactive presentation will explore these questions and more, as we look deeper into how our physical teaching and learning environments affect pedagogy. In 2012, the University of Lethbridge initiated the Learning Environment Evaluation (LEE) Project to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching and learning spaces, and to inform the planning process of future spaces (new construction and renovations). In summer 2014, the LEE project expanded with the modification of 3 classrooms on campus, creating 3 unique active learning environments, including our first SCALE-UP classroom. SCALE-UP classrooms have been shown to have significant impact on student performance and engagement in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines (Beichner, 2008; Benson, Orr, Biggers, Moss, Ohland, & Schiff, 2010; Freeman et al., 2014). However, the majority of instructors who have utilized the SCALE –UP room at the University of Lethbridge have been from outside of these disciplines. This has focused our research on the effectiveness of this space for teaching across disciplines. The goal of this presentation is to share the results of our research and spark a debate regarding the impact of the physical classroom on teaching and learning. We will also engage in a discussion about new pedagogies, such as the flipped classroom, and the impact it has on student performance.

Beichner, R. J. (2008). The SCALE-UP project: A student-centered, active learning environment for undergraduate programs. An invited white paper for the National Academy of Sciences. Retrieved from http://physics.ucf.edu/~bindell/PHY%202049%20SCALE-UP%20Fall%202011/Beichner_CommissionedPaper.pdf

Benson, L. C., Orr, M. K., Biggers, S. B. Moss, W. F., Ohland, M. W. & Schiff, S. D. (2010). Student-centered active, cooperative learning in engineering. International Journal of Engineering Education, 26(5), 1097-1110.

Freeman, S., Eddy, S. L., McDonough, M., Smith, M. K., Okoroafor, N., Jordt, H., Wenderoth, M. P. (2014). Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(23), 8410-8415. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1319030111

Speakers
avatar for David Hinger (University of Lethbridge)

David Hinger (University of Lethbridge)

Director - Teaching Centre, University of Lethbridge
David Hinger completed a BFA in multimedia in the spring of 2003, and a Master of Education degree in spring 2007 from the University of Lethbridge. He joined the CRDC in January 2003, and assumed the Director position in July 2007. In September of 2007 David assumed additional responsibilities... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Director Room

10:45am PDT

CON12.02 - Aligning values and practice in academic settings: Reflections from a study involving instructors’ and students’ perspectives about learning
University-level students have been found to use study strategies that are less effective for complex learning and less reflective of self-regulation than those required for their coursework (Pintrich, 2002; Kesici & Erdoğan, 2004; Sheard, Carbone, & Hurst, 2010). Supporting student learning in higher education involves understanding not only students’ challenges but also investigating what is considered effective learning within a particular academic environment. Aligned with the conference theme of Achieving Harmony: Tuning into Practice, this session will invite participants to reflect upon the kinds of learning valued within their particular academic contexts and the extent to which this learning is supported in the classroom. Presenters will share results from their own mixed-method research within the Academic Enhancement Program (http://cs.sfu.ca/CC/AEP/), which revealed dissonance between students’ attitudes, motivations, and perceptions about learning (Pintrich et al., 1991) and instructors’ perspectives and expectations of student learning and success. These findings highlight the need for educators to consider what beliefs and norms about student learning are valued and whether our practices are aligned with the desired learning and the adoption of disciplinary norms and attitudes. We will share how we used instructor perspectives to develop co-curricular activities to familiarize students with valued attitudes and expectations about learning. We will offer our findings as a springboard for participants to reflect upon their own academic contexts and to bring these reflections back to their respective areas of practice.

References:

Kesici, S., & Erdoğan, A. (2009). Predicting college students' mathematics anxiety by motivational beliefs and self-regulated learning strategies. College Student Journal, 43(2), 631-642.

Pintrich, P., Smith, D., Garcia, T. & McKeachie, W. (1991). A manual for the use of the motivated strategies for learning questionnaire (MSLQ). Ann Arbor, MI: NCRIPTAL, School of Education, University of Michigan.

Pintrich, P. (2002). The role of metacognitive knowledge in learning, teaching, and assessing. Theory into Practice, 41(4), 219-225.

Sheard, J., Carbone, A., & Hurst, J. (2010). Student engagement in first year of an ICT degree: Staff and student perceptions, Computer Science Education, 20(1), 1-16.


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Bayshore Salon EF

10:45am PDT

CON12.04 - Using reflective activity to improve student metacognition and attitudes in post-secondary education
This study presents the construction of and research into a term-long, weekly reflective activity designed to enhance students’ metacognition and attitudes toward mathematics in a university course offered both face-to-face and online. While the course is in mathematics, the design and principles of the reflective activity can be adapted to any course “by helping students learn about themselves as learners in the context of acquiring content knowledge” (Bransford et al., 2000, p. 78). The weekly reflective activity is sequential: instructor provides reflection prompt, student responds, instructor selects feedback. The prompts “serve a cueing purpose to enhance the students’ cognitive and metacognitive capabilities and lead to the behaviors associated with a deep learning approach” (Chin & Brown, 2000, p. 133). The student provides a response by analyzing how the concept/exploration is affecting and changing her knowledge, thinking and learning. Then the instructor selects one predetermined feedback (based on expressing confidence, frustration, language barrier, etc.) to each student response as support for the metacognitive analysis. Preliminary research into the effectiveness demonstrate that the benefits are threefold: (1) improvement of students’ metacognition; (2) positive change in attitude toward mathematics; and (3) achievement of (1) and (2) in both versions of the course regardless of who the instructor is. The audience itself is given an exploration followed by a reflective activity. The discussion that will ensue will hopefully support that the design of the reflective activity allows its adaptation by instructors of a wide variety of post-secondary courses. 

Bransford, J., Brown, A. L., & Cocking, R. R. (2000). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school (expanded edition). Washington, DC: National Research Council.

Chin, C., & Brown, D. E. (2000). Learning in science: A comparison of deep and surface approaches. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 37(2), 109-138.

Zohar, A., & David, A. B. (2009). Paving a clear path in a thick forest: A conceptual analysis of a metacognitive component. Metacognition and Learning, 4(3), 177-195.

Speakers
avatar for Petra Menz

Petra Menz

Senior Lecturer, Simon Fraser University
I am particularly interested in helping students transition from high school to post-secondary education as well as teaching mathematics to students who want to become elementary teachers.



Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Seymour Room

10:45am PDT

CON12.05 - Le portfolio: un outil d'évaluation pour la formation des maîtres
Depuis plusieurs années, la majorité des universités qui offrent des programmes de formation à l’enseignement demandent aux étudiants de se constituer, tout au long de leur formation, un portfolio professionnel. Celui-ci se définit comme un outil où la réflexion, l’autoévaluation et la créativité permettent de faire des liens entre les objectifs d’apprentissage et les apprentissages réalisés. Le portfolio professionnel devient par le fait même de nature évaluative, permettant la prise en compte du produit et du processus de développement professionnel. Le projet de recherche doctorale étudiera la pertinence d’utiliser cet outil pour l’évaluation des apprentissages en formation des maîtres à partir des représentations aussi bien des formateurs universitaires qui évaluent les portfolios que des étudiants qui sont évalués à l’aide de ceux-ci, et ce, à l’aide de questionnaires, d’entrevues et d’analyses de documents. La communication vise donc à préciser les objectifs de cette recherche qualitative ainsi qu’à en présenter le cadre conceptuel. Finalement, des prospectives méthodologiques seront proposées, compte tenu de l’avancement des travaux.

Bélair, L., Laveault, D. et Lebel, C. (2007). Les compétences professionnelles en enseignement et leur évaluation. Ottawa, Ontario : Les Presses de l’Université d’Ottawa.

Gérard, F.-M. (2008). Évaluer des compétences : guide pratique. Bruxelles, Belgique : De Boeck.

Jorro, A. et Maurice, J. J. (2008). De l’analyse à l’évaluation d’une pratique professionnelle. In G. Baillat, J-M. De Ketele, L. Paquay et C. Thélot (ed.), Evaluer pour former (p. 29-42). Bruxelles, Belgique : De Boeck.

Portelance, L. (2008). L’évaluation intégrée à la formation par compétences. In L. Lafortune, D. Martin, S. Ouellet, C. Lebel, N. Perrin et S. Wokusch (ed.). L’évaluation des compétences professionnelles en formation à l’enseignement (p. 13-34). Québec, Québec : Presses de l’Université du Québec.

Speakers
avatar for Helene Meunier

Helene Meunier

Conseillère pédagogique, UQAM
Chargée de cours au département d’éducation et pédagogie ainsi qu’au département de didactique à l’Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Hélène Meunier est aussi conseillère pédagogique à l’UQAM depuis février 2014 et termine un doctorat en évaluation des... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Thompson Room

10:45am PDT

CON12.11 - Online evaluation of courses: Examining impact on participation rates and evaluation scores
At one of Ontario’s largest Universities, course evaluations involve some 6,000 course sections and over 43,000 students every year. This paper-based format requires over 650,000 sheets of paper, 20,000 envelopes, and the support of dozens of administrative staff members. Stemming from an interest in efficiency, environmental sustainability and reduced cost, this university is seeking to join numerous other Canadian institutions in adopting an online system for the evaluation of courses. Among the greatest concerns identified in the literature on the online evaluation of courses is the decrease in student participation (Adams & Umbach, 2012). Most studies on the subject point to a lower participation rate for online evaluation as compared with paper-based evaluations (Gamliel & Davidovitz, 2005; Nevo, McClean & Nevo, 2010). Lower participation rates in course evaluations raises questions which include: How representative are the students who complete the questionnaire compared with the overall student body taking the course? Might lower achieving students and those least satisfied with the course be overrepresented when using an online evaluation format? This presentation seeks to address these issues by presenting the results of a recent institutional report on the impact of the online evaluation of courses on student participation rates and on the evaluation scores as compared with the paper-based method. The session is largely structured as a presentation of salient report results with participant discussion throughout. All documents and materials will be provided in both English and French.

References:

Adams, M. J. D. & Umbach, P.D. (2012). Nonresponse and Online Student Evaluations of Teaching: Understanding the Influence of Salience, Fatigue, and Academic Environments, Research in Higher Education, 53(5), 576-591.

Gamliel, E. & Davidovitz, L. (2005). Online versus traditional teaching evaluation: mode can matter, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 30(6), 581-592.

Nevo, D., McClean, R. & Nevo, S. (2010). Harnessing Information Technology to Improve the Process of Students’ Evaluations of Teaching: An Exploration of Students’ Critical Success Factors of Online Evaluations, Journal of Information Systems Education, 21(1), 99-109.



Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Cypress 1 Room