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Achieving Harmony: Tuning into Practice

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Wednesday, June 17
 

11:15am PDT

CON01.07 - From caving to robots: Integration of experiential learning into a curriculum
The coalescence of experiential and interdisciplinary learning opportunities in conjunction with the traditional classroom experience is an important aspiration for Universities but one that involves careful instructional planning and strong institutional (and faculty) support (Porter et al., 2012). The creation of Interdisciplinary Experiences (IE) courses at McMaster University in 2013 has provided students in the Arts & Science and Integrated Science programs with an opportunity to take courses offering unique learning experiences that significantly complement more traditional, lecture-based courses (Davis, 1995; McMaster University, 2015). The courses are for credit towards degree requirements and open to students from both the Faculties of Science and Humanities. This discussion aims to cover the creation, implementation, logistics, assessment and resulting student feedback from IE courses.

There have been nine unique IE courses run over the last two years, covering a diverse range of topics. Some courses, such as the aptly named ‘Electronics for the Rest of Us!’ have been based around a task, such as designing and building an electronic device of choice while others, like the ‘Kentucky Caving Field Course’, take students into the field, experiencing the science and culture of the Kentucky, USA cave system.

This discussion will give participants an opportunity to actively participate in sharing reactions and feedback to the challenges and successes of the IE courses. Within the session we will work through the process of creating such courses based upon discussion around the room while taking into account potential logistical challenges and assessment methods.

Davis, J. R. (1995). Interdisciplinary Courses and Team Teaching: New Arrangements for Learning. Phoenix: American Council on Education and Oryx Press.

McMaster University. (2015). Experiential Learning – Arts & Science Program. Retrieved from http://artsci.mcmaster.ca/experiential-learning/

Porter, G., King, J., Goodkin, N., & Chan, C. (2012). Experiential Learning in a Common Core Curriculum: Student Expectations, Evaluations, and the Way Forward. International Education Studies, 5, 24-38.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am PDT
Salon 2

11:15am PDT

CON01.08 - “Over Easy” flipped experience: preparing faculty to effectively implement flipped teaching
In 2012, flipped teaching had established itself as a rapidly growing practice in teaching and learning (Goodwin & Miller, 2013). Flipped teaching is a practice that opens up in-class time for active learning strategies by moving the lecture content from in the classroom to prior to class, often in the form of videos (McLaughlin et al., 2014). At our institution, we wanted to create a professional development opportunity for our faculty members to begin utilizing this practice effectively. As a result, we developed and offered the “Over Easy” Flipped Experience. This workshop was designed to be very practical. To achieve this, the workshop we offered was flipped. This meant that faculty participants were required to explore and complete online materials prior to attending. Goals of the workshop were for participants to be able to articulate what flipped teaching is and why it would be used, to create and distribute a lecture video, and to create a student-centred lesson plan to use in conjunction with the flipped pre-class materials. The workshop has now been offered three times. Attendees of this interactive session will be provided with specific details of the design and structure of this workshop and given the opportunity to discuss strategies for developing faculty skills in using flipped teaching. Evidence will also be presented on the effectiveness of this workshop in terms of how many participants went on to flip their classes, how many employed other techniques and strategies presented, and any feedback they have for improving the workshop.

McLaughlin, J. E., Roth, M. T., Glatt, D. M., Gharkholonarehe, N., Davidson, C. A., Griffin, L. M., Esserman, D. A., & Mumper, R. J. (2014). The flipped classroom: a course redesign to foster learning and engagement in a health professions school. Academic Medicine, 89(2), 236-243.

Goodwin, B., & Miller, K. (2013). Research Says / Evidence on Flipped Classrooms Is Still Coming In. Educational Leadership, 70(6).

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Banow (University of Saskatchewan)

Ryan Banow (University of Saskatchewan)

Instructional Designer, University of Saskatchewan



Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am PDT
Salon 3

11:15am PDT

CON01.06 - Art-making in health professions education: From research to practice
There is strong evidence supporting the personal and professional benefits for medical students of exposure to art. There is limited information on the value or potential role of art-making in relation to medical education. We explored the role of art-making within medical education by analyzing 76 artist statements submitted with visual artwork by students, residents, and practitioners to a national health care student/practitioner art exhibit. We analyzed the data inductively using grounded theory strategies and this generated eight themes: enhancing learning, escaping constraints, balancing life and work, surviving, expressing self identity and discovering professional identity, bearing witness, healing self and others, and advocating change. These themes attest to the instrumental, humanistic and other impacts of art-making in the context of medical education and practice. In this interactive session, we will draw upon research findings from a recent qualitative study to show how the practice of art-making can play a valuable role in the education of health professionals. We will also explore several stories of how art-making has offered a powerful humanizing influence through fostering new insight, increasing empathy and enhancing communicative and relational competence amongst students in the health professions. A selection of images of artworks created by medical students will be used to stimulate dialogue amongst session participants and elicit ideas about how art-making could be incorporated into many aspects of health professions education. These ideas will be recorded live in a mind-map and made available to participants after the session along with a list of resources. 

Dissanayake, E. (1995). Homo aestheticus: Where art comes from and why. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press.

Goldie, J. (2012). The formation of professional identity in medical students: Considerations for Educators. Medical Teacher. 34, e641-e648. 

Kumagai, A.K. (2012). Perspective: Acts of interpretation: A philosophical approach to using creative arts in medical education. Academic Medicine. 87, 1138-1144.

Siegel, M. (1995). More than words: the generative power of transmediation for learning. Canadian Journal of Education. 20, 455-475.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am PDT
Salon 1

11:15am PDT

CON01.03 - Tracking learning outcomes and assessment results in learning management systems
The changing landscapes for post-secondary education are increasingly requiring colleges and universities to measure educational quality, be more accountable and demonstrate how programs are maintaining standards. Measuring educational quality is more complex than simply measuring inputs and outputs (UNESCO 1990, 2000). Accrediting bodies such as the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs (ACBSP) require institutions to explicitly show evidence of how course and program learning outcomes are measured and aligned with an appropriate assessment strategy. Measuring learning outcomes includes examining course and program designs, pedagogy and faculty philosophies on learning and teaching (Bresciani et al., 2010).  This interactive presentation will have participants examine and classify the level of learning outcomes presented and then determine the types of assessment strategies that would align with the learning outcomes. Strategies for tracking student success of each learning outcome using a data base and learning management system will be presented. Participants will then engage in discussions to determine the benefits and challenges to creating and managing these tracking processes and if such processes contribute to learning and teaching and academic improvements (Nusche, 2008). 

References:

Bresciani, M. J., Gardner, M. M., & Hickmott, J. (2010). Demonstrating Student Success: A Practical Guide to Outcomes-Based Assessment of Learning and Development in Student Affairs. Stylus Publishing, LLC. PO Box 605, Herndon, VA 20172-0605.

Nusche, D. (2008). Assessment of learning outcomes in higher education: A comparative review of selected practices (No. 15). OECD Publishing.

UNESCO (2000). Dakar framework for action. Education for all: Meeting our collective commitments. Adopted by the World Education Forum, Dakar, Senegal, April 26-28, 1999. Paris: UNESCO. http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0012/001211/121147e.pdf



Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:15am - 11:45am PDT
Thompson Room

12:00pm PDT

CON02.09 - Using curriculum mapping to help institutions visualise change
STLHE members have a long history of working to inspire institutional change, not least through curriculum review, (re)design and transformation (Wolf and Christensen Hughes, 2008). We (the authors) wanted a simple, non proprietary and user-friendly method for visually mapping academic-program courses in order to support our university-wide curricular work with departments and faculties. Curricular maps: save time by allowing curriculum committees to visualise the implications of potential curricular changes before the substantial work of making them is actually undertaken; have the advantage of motivating change, as colleagues can see the logic (or otherwise) of the existing course sequence and where there are barriers to student progress; and represent a clear way of communicating to students regarding their program choices, best path to degree and progress to-date. The goals of this session are to: (i) help others who might wish to develop something similar, (ii) document the potential of visual curricular maps for motivating change and (iii) have participants share experiences and think about possible opportunities for implementation at home. The session will be interactive and experiential. Participants will have a chance to: (i) try out the curricular mapping process our academic departments go through (ii) directly experience how visualisation of curricular issues can save time and resources, as well as supporting a faster transition to a student-centred curriculum and (iii) ask questions and establish community. 

Dawson, T. (2013). A guide to program and curriculum planning. Victoria, BC: The Learning and Teaching Centre, University of Victoria.

Wolf, P. & Christensen Hughes, J. (Eds.). (2007, Winter). Curriculum development in higher education: Faculty-driven processes and practices. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 112. San Francisco, California: Jossey-Bass.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Salon 2

12:00pm PDT

CON02.10 - From mobile access to multi-device learning ecologies: A case study
As mobile access is turning into primary access, many universities and organizations find themselves constantly challenged to keep up with student expectations. At the same time, we have moved further into an age of networked information and students have easier access to better quality educational resources outside of university than ever before. Faced with these opportunities, university instructor and software interaction designer Paul Hibbitts has pushed the boundaries of his multi-device course companions in order to improve learner experience and better support an open and ever-evolving learning ecology. In this presentation, Paul will present a multi-device course companion case study then share for discussion two recently published learning and education models: 1) a learning + technology development model which attempts to further unify learner needs, experience, and technology and 2) a multi-device learning ecology diagnostic tool and framework.

Allen, Michael. (2012) Leaving ADDIE for SAM: An Agile Model for Developing the Best Learning Experiences. Alexandria, VA: ASTD Press.

Quinn, C. (2012) The Mobile Academy: mLearning for Higher Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/John Wiley

Vai, M. and Sosulski, K. (2011). The Essential Guide to Online Course Design: A Standards-Based Guide (Essentials of Online Learning). NY, New York: Routledge.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Hibbitts

Paul Hibbitts

Educator, Interaction Designer and Open Source Developer, Hibbitts Design / Simon Fraser University
For over 20 years Paul has delivered design solutions, customized training and practical strategies for organizations such as SAP BusinessObjects, The Canadian Real Estate Association and The University of British Columbia. Combining his professional user experience design skill set... Read More →



Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Salon 3

12:00pm PDT

CON02.01 - Realizing SoTL through teamwork: Faculty, staff and students working together
Our teaching and learning development grants program is facilitated by a team of individuals that includes faculty and graduate students, from a range of disciplines, and support staff. The non-competitive grants program provides faculty with $5-10K and other supports to investigate questions about teaching and learning. It is designed to enhance individual faculty knowledge and practice and to engage them in teaching as a socially situated practice (Team authored, in press). We employ Norton’s (2009) notion of “pedagogical action research” as a working framework by supporting faculty members’ efforts to produce research evidence at a micro level (through their individual projects) with the aim of dissemination resulting in changes at the meso (course and departmental) and macro (institutional) levels. The foci of this session are the values underpinning our practice and how we accomplish our work as a team. Our teamwork is advantaged by our diverse roles and disciplinary perspectives, yet we are guided by a shared vision unencumbered by pre-existing hierarchical relationships. Together we facilitate the grants process, read relevant literature, conduct ongoing evaluation of the program (Team authored, in press), co-present and co-author publications. The session begins with attendees sharing (in pairs) if and how grants programs at their institutions are conducted and ends with a period of “critical questioning” where participants probe more deeply the practices and values presented by both facilitators and participants. This session will be of most interest to those involved in the conduct of, or wanting to develop similar teams and grants programs.

(Team authored) (in press). The intentional design of a SoTL initiative. New Directions in Teaching and Learning.

(Team authored) (in press). Evaluating a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Grants Program: Our Framework, Process, Initial Findings and Reflections. Studies in Educational Evaluation.

Norton, Lin. S. (2009). Action Research in Teaching and Learning: A Practical Guide to Conducting Pedagogical Research in Universities. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Bayshore Salon D

12:00pm PDT

CON02.08 - I flipped my tutorials: A case study of implementing active learning strategies in Engineering
Faculty Learning Communities (Cox, 2004) have been designed to introduce professors to a variety of active learning strategies (Prince, 2004) in the Faculty of Engineering at a large, research-intensive North American public university. After participating for more than a year a chemical Engineering professor and her teaching assistant (TA) decided to restructure their course to make it more student-centered. This resulted in a course where multiple active learning strategies (open-ended student response system, peer-review assignments, online quizzes and flipped tutorials) were used by both the instructor in class and the TA in tutorials. During this interactive session, the instructor, TA and educational developer will discuss the activities undertaken during the term. Several of the strategies will be used during the course of the session (e.g. open-ended response system, online quizzes and videos). Recommendations will be provided for future implementation of these strategies. The instructor and TA will share their reflections on the trajectory they followed in shifting from a teacher-centered approach to a more student-centered, evidence based teaching practice. We will share the results of a student survey and discuss how the instructor plans to respond to student feedback in future iterations of the course. We will provide examples where feedback was mixed, such as in the peer review exercises, invite participants to share their own experiences with similar strategies, and brainstorm ways to move forward given the contextual constraints.

Cox, M. D. (2004). Introduction to faculty learning communities. New directions for teaching and learning, 97, 5-23.

Prince, M. (2004). Does active learning work? A review of the research. Journal of engineering education, 93, 223-231.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:00pm - 12:30pm PDT
Salon 1
 
Thursday, June 18
 

3:00pm PDT

CON07.11 - Rich learning outcomes by design in a science citizenship course
Pollution. Violence. Cancer. Global warming. Poverty. Rarely do we teach these subjects in Science courses at University. Instead, we teach Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, etc. At a deep level, the structure of our Science courses and programs instill a bottom-up philosophy of knowledge construction that is at odds with what we understand are some of the engaging ways that university students learn [Martin & Dowson, 2009] and in which Science is performed [Alberts, 2009]. This presentation will showcase how multi-domain course learning outcomes that integrate translational skill development with disciplinary and interdisciplinary curricular learning can be easily designed in a project-based course, "Science Citizenship". This novel community service learning course for Science students asks them to choose a global issue. Working in groups, they research the science behind the issue, write a proposal for seed funds to implement a local solution, and present their work creatively at the end of the year. In this workshop-like presentation, the participants will work in teams to develop their own mini-course that integrates multi-level and multi-domain learning outcomes, guided by the experience and research results from Science Citizenship at our university which we will present in parallel with this activity. This activity will be facilitated by the instructor and a student peer mentor from the Science Citizenship course.

References:

B. Alberts (2009) Redefining Science Education, Science 323(5913), 437.

A. J. Martin & M. Dowson (2009) Interpersonal Relationships, Motivation,Engagement, and Achievement: Yields for Theory,Current Issues, and Educational Practice, Rev. Educ. Res. 79(1), 327-365.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm PDT
Cypress 1 Room

3:00pm PDT

CON07.10 - Transforming the student learning experience: Using ePortfolios to engage students in an active research process
This interactive session will focus on what we consider a high impact practice that helped to transform a necessary, but slightly ‘tired’ classroom practice - the research project. In order to create a more meaningful, engaging and transformative learning experience for our students, we piloted ePortfolios. Moving from a paper-based portfolio, often hurriedly pieced together at the end of term, to an ePortfolio project that is visible and accessible to students throughout the term is in-line with transformative learning practices which value the active learner and support different learning styles. ePortfolios can transform the learning experience by providing a venue for students to reflect on and integrate their learning (Eynon, Gambino, & Török, 2014), shifting the emphasis on the process rather than the product and on learning rather than teaching. The use of ePortfolios as active learning tools leads to learning that is “...captured, shared, revised, assessed, presented, reassessed, reflected upon, and integrated…” (Batson, 2011, p. 109). The presenters will share the design stage, assignment guidelines, ePortfolio template, assessment practices, and student ePortfolio examples. Session participants will be guided through a hands-on review and discussion of a sample ePortfolio in terms of four components: digital literacy and multimodal artifacts, high impact practice, documentation of learning process, and reflection. 

References:

Batson, T. (2011). Situated learning: A theoretical frame to guide transformational change using electronic portfolio technology. International Journal of ePortoflio 1(1), 107-109. http://www.theijep.com/pdf/IJEP34.pdf

Eynon, B., Gambino, L. M., & Török, J. (2014). What difference can ePortfolio make? A field report from the Connect to Learning project. International Journal of ePortfolio, 4(1), 95-114.http://www.theijep.com/pdf/IJEP127.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Peggy Hartwick

Peggy Hartwick

Instructor, Carleton University
Peggy was a recipient of the 2015 Brightspace Innovation Award in Teaching and Learning. She is an Instructor and PhD student in the School of Linguistics and Language Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa. As a passionate educator who cares deeply about her students’ learning... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm PDT
Salon 3

3:00pm PDT

CON07.08 - Making the case: Building capacity for case-based learning
Using case studies can be a highly effective teaching tool to engage students and teach higher-level critical thinking and analysis skills (Dunne & Brooks, 2004). Case-Based Learning (CBL) allows students to develop a collaborative approach to learning; fosters integrated learning; and promotes self-assessment, reflection and life-long learning (Williams, 2005). Interest in using cases as real world examples in undergraduate and graduate teaching has been increasing among instructors at our institution. However, instructor definitions of what a “case” is vary, as do methods used when teaching with cases. A project to build capacity and share expertise within and between disciplines for writing and teaching with cases has garnered interest and involvement from over 30 departments across campus. In this session, we will use an adapted “case method” to leverage the knowledge and experience of participants by examining the “case” of our attempt to build capacity for case-based learning. Background about the context at our institution and how we approached building capacity about CBL will be provided to participants to serve as a “case”. The traditional “case method” involves individual consideration of the case, then discussion of the case in small groups, followed by a facilitated discussion with the full group to explore issues and recommendations (Erskine et al., 2011). This will serve to demonstrate the “case method” to participants who are unfamiliar with it, encourage participants to share their own successes and challenges with CBL, and share what we have learned in our project.

Dunne, D. & Brooks, K. (2004). Teaching with cases. Halifax, NS: Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.

Erskine, J., Leenders, M., & Mauffette-Leenders, L. (2011). Teaching with Cases, 3rd Edition. London, ON: Ivey Publishing, Richard Ivey School of Business, Western University.

Williams B. (2005). Case based learning – a review of the literature: is there scope for this educational paradigm in prehospital education? Emergency Medical Journal, 22(8), 577-81.

Speakers
SA

scott anderson

Liaison, University of Waterloo
course design, curriculum design, curriculum mapping, case based learning, technology in teaching


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm PDT
Salon 1

3:45pm PDT

CON08.10 - Discursive dexterity: Rhetoric and the resolution of disciplinary tensions
In this interactive session participants will explore educational rhetoric and seek strategies for negotiating discursive tensions amidst diverse academic cultures (Pinar, 2004). Because concepts like “data,” “assessment,” “engagement,” and “educational objectives” carry different connotations in different scholastic communities, and because scholars of teaching and learning often function as liaisons amongst these communities, it is important to acknowledge the cultural ramifications of language and develop a degree of linguistic dexterity in order to foster respectful exchange amongst these diverse communities (Noddings, 2012; Davis et al, 2000). After a brief introduction and critique of contemporary curricular terms and rhetoric (Luce-Kapler, 2004), participants will engage in small group discussions, examining problematic or contentious educational language from different disciplinary perspectives. Thereafter the facilitator will lead a large group discussion where participants will share findings from their small groups. Both the small and large group discussions will provide opportunities to identify and disseminate the strategies participants employ in their respective practices for translating or disambiguating educational terms and rhetoric. 

Davis, B., Sumara, D. & Luce-Kapler, R. (2000). Engaging minds: Learning and teaching in a complex world. Mahwah, NJ. Lawrence Erlbaum.

Luce-Kapler, R. (2004). Writing with, through and beyond the text: An ecology of language. Mahwah, NJ. Lawrence Erlbaum.

Noddings, N. (2012). Philosophy of education. Boulder, CO. Westview Press.

Pinar, W. (2004). What is curriculum theory?. Mahwah, NJ. Lawrence Erlbaum.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Salon 2

3:45pm PDT

CON08.11 - Reducing presentation anxiety by using active learning classrooms
Creating harmony in the classroom starts with fostering a welcoming atmosphere that fosters a safe learning environment, yet even in the safest classroom a persistent fear for most students is presenting in front of the class (Furmark, 2002). Presentation anxiety can lead to a lifelong crippling fear of speaking in front of audiences (small or large) (MacKenzie & Fowler, 2013) and can cause students to avoid disciplines or careers they could have thrived in and been very successful (Stein, et al., 1996; Van Ameringen, et al., 2003). Because presentations are a large part of students’ academic experience and future careers, the purpose of this presentation is to ignite discussion on how spatial configuration and technology in a given classroom can facilitate or reduce presentation anxiety. Participants are invited to think back to their experience as students and/or as an instructor seeing students express anxiety during presentations. They will fill out a questionnaire on presentation anxiety by imagining themselves as a student presenting in a traditional room and then in an Active Learning Classroom (ALCs), and share their responses with a partner. Next, a brief summary will be given on a case study in which one course used the spatial configuration and technology in ALCs to scaffold presentation skills that led to students building confidence in their presentation skills. This will be followed by a discussion with participants on how their first discussions compare with the results from the study, and together brainstorm what aspects they would take away from this session to implement into their classrooms. 

Furmark, T. (2002). Social phobia: overview of community surveys. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 105(2), 84-93.

MacKenzie, M. B., & Fowler, K. F. (2013). Social anxiety disorder in the Canadian population: Exploring gender differences in sociodemographic profile.Journal of anxiety disorders, 27(4), 427-434.

Stein, M. B., Walker, J. R., & Forde, D. R. (1996). Public-speaking fears in a community sample: Prevalence, impact on functioning, and diagnostic classification. Archives of General Psychiatry, 53(2), 169-174. 

Van Ameringen, M., Mancini, C., & Farvolden, P. (2003). The impact of anxiety disorders on educational achievement. Journal of anxiety disorders, 17(5), 561-571.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Salon 3

3:45pm PDT

CON08.09 - How can mid-course evaluations of teaching inform our teaching practice and improve students’ learning experiences?
Student evaluations of teaching (SETs) are the most common approach to evaluating quality of instruction in higher education (Winchester & Winchester, 2012). Typically, SETs are completed towards the end of a course as a means of summative assessment. However, mid-course evaluations of teaching are being increasingly promoted as a way for instructors to collect useful formative feedback from students partway through a course (University of British Columbia Mid-course Feedback, n.d.). These informal evaluations are typically conducted approximately halfway through the term, enabling students’ feedback to be analyzed and applied, as appropriate, during that course offering. Gathering and applying feedback in this way acknowledges its context-specific nature and has the potential to enhance the teaching and learning environment in notable ways (Cook-Sather, 2009). Currently, 30% of instructors in our Faculty indicate they gather mid-course feedback from students in their courses. This interactive session will draw upon our experiences conducting mid-course evaluations of teaching in approximately 40 undergraduate and graduate courses, ranging in size from 15 to 200 students. We will share insights regarding various approaches to conducting evaluations and provide examples of ways in which students’ mid-course feedback has had significant impacts on our teaching practice. Through facilitated discussion and small-group learning activities, we will support participants in identifying strategies to i) effectively administer mid-course evaluations of teaching in their own particular contexts, and ii) analyze and reflect upon students’ mid-course feedback in order to both inform one’s teaching practice and improve the learning experience for students.

Cook-Sather, A. (2009). From traditional accountability to shared responsibility: the benefits and challenges of student consultants gathering midcourse feedback in college classrooms. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 34, 231-241.

University of British Columbia Mid-course Feedback. Retrieved from http://midterm.teacheval.ubc.ca

Winchester, M. K., & Winchester, T. M. (2012). If you build it, will they come? Exploring the student perspective of weekly student evaluations of teaching. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 37, 671-682.

Speakers
avatar for Judy Chan

Judy Chan

Education Consultant, Faculty Liaison, University of British Columbia
UBC


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Salon 1

4:30pm PDT

CON09.06 - Culturally inclusive pedagogy: Co-educating with First Nations partners to create reciprocal place-based learning partnerships for students and the community
This session discusses a culturally inclusive community-based project in which the instructor, in partnership with BC Parks and Snuneymuxw First Nation, designed and implemented a community-based research assignment to help undergraduates achieve learning outcomes. Community-based learning was the best fit for this project in the context of the undergraduate course because of its connectedness to collaborative learning (Porter, Summers, Toton, & Aisenstein, 2008), and reciprocity with the community (d’Arlach, Sanchez, & Feuer, 2009), both of which were relevant to teaching pedagogy and course outcomes. The presentation will discuss the impetus for going off-campus; how we came to partner with one another; how the project was reciprocal in nature; and the benefits and challenges of taking the teaching and learning off-campus.

References 

d'Arlach, L., Sanchez, B., & Feuer, R. (2009). Voices from the community: A case for reciprocity in service-learning. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 16(1), 5-16.

Porter, J. R., Summers, M., Toton, S., & Aisenstein, H. (2008). Service-learning with a food stamp enrollment campaign: Community and student benefits. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 14(2), 66-75.

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Bortolin

Kathleen Bortolin

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning Specialist, Vancouver Island University


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Thompson Room

4:30pm PDT

CON09.11 - ePortfolio assignment design, integration, and student learning
This interactive session introduces a recent pilot project that explored benefits of, impediments to, and effective practices in implementing course-level ePortfolio assignments at Carleton University. Carleton’s teaching and learning centre is supporting individual instructors through individual consultations and a Faculty Learning Community which, like ePortfolios, is founded on a social pedagogy that posits that deep, integrative learning requires regular engagement and feedback. Faculty who volunteered to take part in the pilot project between August and December 2014, received support but ultimately made their own decisions about how to implement ePortfolios as assessment tools in their courses. We present some initial data collected from students, and in keeping with previous research in this area (Eynon, Gambino, and Torok, 2014; Rodgers, 2002; Wildman, Hable, Preston, and Magliaro, 2000; Wolfe and Miller, 1997), to help us identify how student learning was impacted by (1) ePortfolio assignment design and (2) degree of assignment integration throughout the course. Through a group discussion, and with the guidance of worksheets, presenters and session participants will develop a further list of effective practices to guide faculty and educational developers to implement ePortfolios that enhance students’ learning journeys. By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

1. identify benefits of, impediments to, and effective practices associated with implementing ePortfolios as assessment tools; 
2. recommend additional effective practices that draw directly on their own experiences with designing assessment tools;
3. reflect on how they might adapt these practices to their own institutional context.

References: 

Eynon, B., Gambino, L. M., & Török, J. 2014. “Reflection, Integration, and ePortfolio Pedagogy.” Accessed August 12, 2014, http://c2l.mcnrc.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/8/2014/01/Reflective_Pedagogy.pdf

Rodgers, Carol. 2002. “Defining Reflection: Another Look at Dewey and Reflective Thinking. Teachers College Review, 104 (4), 842-66.

Wildman, T., Hable, M., Preston, M., & Magliaro, S. 2000. Faculty student groups: Solving "good problems" through study, reflection, and collaboration. Innovative Higher Education, 24(4), 247-263.

Wolfe, E.W., & Miller, T.R. 1997. “Barriers to the implementation of portfolio assessment in secondary education.” Applied Measurement in Education, 10(3), 235-51.


Thursday June 18, 2015 4:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Salon 3
 
Friday, June 19
 

10:45am PDT

CON12.09 - Developing collaborative teaching and learning initiatives in support of diversity and inclusive practices in higher education
The Teaching and Learning Framework at Memorial University emphasizes work that is engaging, supportive, inclusive, transformative, and outcomes-oriented for both educators and learners. The goal was to develop initiatives to respond to the specific needs of identified groups of non-traditional learners: 1) academically vulnerable first year students; 2) students with individual learning needs associated with disorders and/or mental health issues; 3) international students and those from non-western cultures. The challenges faced by non-traditional students have received considerable attention in the literature (Gardner & Holley, 2011; Offerman, 2011; Rendon, Jalomo, & Nora, 2000). Research has shown that non-traditional students have a higher rate of attrition than traditional students (Bean & Metzner, 1985). These students face the challenge of finding a balance between their academic and external commitments that allows for them to sustain a sufficient level of engagement. It has been found that the most important variables in the retention of non-traditional students are an increased use of learning support services and higher levels of perceived social integration (Gilardi & Guglielmetti, 2011). This presentation will act as a guide through the process of developing initiatives that embrace learner diversity and engage attendees in exploring methods of overcoming challenges. The focus of this session will be on effective practice, and will be of particular interest to university administrators and educators wishing to implement similar initiatives on their campuses. An overview of the research conducted to develop these initiatives will be followed by an open discussion where the sharing of research, initiatives, and best practices for the enhancement of teaching and learning is welcomed.

References:

Bean, J.P., & Metzner, B.S. (1985). A conceptual model of nontraditional undergraduate student attrition. Review of Educational Research, 55(4), 485-540. 

Gardner, S.K., & Holley, K. (2011). “Those invisible barriers are real”: The progression of first-generation students through doctoral education. Equity and Excellence in Education, 44, 77-92. 

Gilardi, S., & Guglielmetti, C. (2011). University life of non-traditional students: Engagement styles and impact on attrition. The Journal of Higher Education, 82(1), 33-53.

Offerman, M. (2011). Profile of the nontraditional doctoral degree student. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 129, 121-130. 

Rendon, L.I., Jalomo, R.E., & Nora, A. (2000). Theoretical considerations in the study of minority student retention in higher education. In J.M. Braxton (Ed.), Reworking the student departure puzzle (pp.127-156). Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press.


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Salon 2

10:45am PDT

CON12.10 - Designing and teaching our first fully online undergraduate course as a team: Successes and challenges
Effective education through online learning often depends on sound e-Pedagogy, clearly articulated goals, measurable outcomes, committed and dedicated instructors, and excellent support from educational developers (Li & Akins, 2005). In this talk, presenters will share their experiences with designing and delivering their first online course as a team. New to online teaching, four faculty members from diverse academic ranks and practical experience levels worked together over a period of three months to articulate and apply the topic of e-Pedagogy to design an innovative course that would engage students not only with the content area but also with technology supportive of the chosen pedagogy. Challenged to come to terms with their understandings (and often misunderstandings) of what an effective online course should look like, the instructors engaged in regular meetings with educational developers to discuss and reconcile their visions for the course with research-supported pedagogical techniques and educational technologies (including a 3D environment) available to bring the learning scenarios to life. The actual implementation of the course, in turn, carried with it unforeseen trials as well as much welcomed triumphs. Participants in this session will leave with a first-hand experience of the said course and an understanding of the challenges and successes that can come from collaboratively designed and team-taught online courses.

Li, Q., & Akins, M. (2005). Sixteen myths about online teaching and learning in higher education: Don’t believe everything you hear. TechTrends, 49, 51-50.

Speakers
avatar for Peggy Hartwick

Peggy Hartwick

Instructor, Carleton University
Peggy was a recipient of the 2015 Brightspace Innovation Award in Teaching and Learning. She is an Instructor and PhD student in the School of Linguistics and Language Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa. As a passionate educator who cares deeply about her students’ learning... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Salon 3

10:45am PDT

CON12.06 - Labyrinths and learning research results: Training the mind to be calm, clear, and creative
This interactive session will present the research results from a SoTL project which investigated the relationships between mindfulness practice using finger labyrinths and the potential to reduce student anxiety, improve concentration, and enhance creativity. The study involved participants from three introductory Creative Writing classes (Fall 2013, Fall 2014, and Winter 2015) at Thompson Rivers University. Data collection included pre-tests, journal surveys, test surveys, and focus groups. In particular, a specialized "labyrinth journal" with a fold-out finger labyrinth design became an innovative data collection tool which was central to the study. Labyrinths, which are ancient patterns large enough to be walked or small enough to be traced with the finger, represent tools for cultivating mindful habits. Mindfulness is the contemplative practice of focusing the attention on the present, non-judgmentally. By training the mind to remain fully present in each moment, the interior mental chatter that often plagues the mind becomes quiet, enhancing capacities or equanimity, clarity, and insight The Association for Contemplative Mind in Higher Education (ACMHE) embraces the labyrinth as a contemplative and experiential resource for student learning, and supports Contemplative Pedagogy as a foundation for an enriched research methodology (2015). Amid a culture that rewards speed and “busyness,” contemplative practice proposes a radical innovation for teaching and learning. This session will offer a brief historical context for labyrinths, provide an overview of contemplative practices for student learning, share the research findings from the project, and invite participants to experience finger labyrinths.

References:

Artress, L. (1995). Walking a sacred path – Rediscovering the labyrinth as a spiritual tool. New York: Riverhead Books.

Kabat-Zinn, J. (2003). Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR). Constructivism in the Human Sciences, 8(2), 73-107.

Wallace, B. A. (2009). Mind in the balance: Meditation in science, Buddhism, and Christianity. New York: Columbia UP. The Association of Contemplative Mind in Higher Education. (2015, April 17). Retrieved from .


Friday June 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:15am PDT
Chairman Room